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Outlandish place names

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Peregrine Arkwright
265361.  Fri Jan 25, 2008 8:20 am Reply with quote

.

As I emerge from hibernation and contemplate vernal travel, I examine a road map.

A place called Wetwang catches my eye. Can anyone offer its derivation, truthful or creative - but at any rate quite interesting?

Peregrine Arkwright

 
samivel
265365.  Fri Jan 25, 2008 8:44 am Reply with quote

Truthfully, Wetwang is probably derived from the Old Norse vaett-vangr, 'field for the trial of a legal action'.

 
Davini994
265373.  Fri Jan 25, 2008 9:02 am Reply with quote

Hooray, Wetwang. Just down the road from where I grew up.

On a North Yorkshire theme, how about:

    Aidenby Quernhow
    Thornton Watlass (what's that lass?)
    Kirby Malzeard
    Little Thirkleby
    Appleton Wiske
    Thornton-le-Beans

 
Hypnobabe
265483.  Fri Jan 25, 2008 2:11 pm Reply with quote

Just watching The One Show, they've just mentioned Wetwang in an article about a place somewhere oop north (from Cambridgeshire, obviously) called Pity Me.

One theory says it's called Pity Me because of the small lake nearby, after the French 'petit mare' (sp?)

 
Ameena
265501.  Fri Jan 25, 2008 4:02 pm Reply with quote

There's a place called Nether Wallop somewhere in the westen-ish areas of England. There's a Lower Wallop fairly nearby too - a friend and I found 'em when randomly browsing through a road atlas for weird place names.
There were some weird places we saw signs for when we were up north too - Sheepwash, Guide Post, and Wide Openare three I can remember :D.

 
djgordy
265535.  Fri Jan 25, 2008 5:18 pm Reply with quote

Davini994 wrote:
Hooray, Wetwang. Just down the road from where I grew up.


There are two interesting things about Wetwang. Most famously, Richard Whiteley was the honorary mayor of Wetwang. Also, there is a place in Middle Earth called Wetwang.

Quote:
The Dead Marshes were located between the marshland called the Wetwang and the plain of Dagorlad where a great battle was fought during the War of the Last Alliance in 3434 of the Second Age. The marshland gradually expanded over the years and covered the graves of the Elves, Men, and Orcs who died in that battle.


http://www.tuckborough.net/marshes.html

You can see it on this map between Dagorlad and Anorien.

http://www.geocities.com/puayc/articles/tokien/middle_earth_map.jpg

This means that Davini994 must have grown up in Mordor. Eeek!

 
Davini994
265583.  Fri Jan 25, 2008 6:47 pm Reply with quote

I am not a LotR fan, so cannot respond with a joke I'm afraid. Would you mind awfully doing it for me?

 
djgordy
265597.  Fri Jan 25, 2008 7:03 pm Reply with quote

Don't you mean "thanks orcfully"?

 
Davini994
265603.  Fri Jan 25, 2008 7:17 pm Reply with quote

That's the one!

Thanks!

 
Peregrine Arkwright
265687.  Sat Jan 26, 2008 3:29 am Reply with quote

.

I've been investigating the north Yorkshire place names listed above.

Appleton Wiske
A model village based on Bournville which pursued an early attempt to develop a cider champagne from the Dales. It failed when the technology crumbled and there were no apples.

Thornton-le-Beans
Another early attempt at Yorkshire food production which failed, so they went over to chocolate instead.

The golden rule about true Yorkshire Food is that it has to begin with 'P', thus pikelets, parkin, pork pies, pickled onions, Pontefract Cakes and Pease Pudding . This vital principle was ignored by those gastronomic pioneers.

Peregrine Arkwright

 
samivel
265777.  Sat Jan 26, 2008 8:47 am Reply with quote

Ameena wrote:
There's a place called Nether Wallop somewhere in the westen-ish areas of England. There's a Lower Wallop fairly nearby too - a friend and I found 'em when randomly browsing through a road atlas for weird place names.


Hmm. Seeing as you're in Kent, I suppose you might be forgiven for thinking of Hampshire as a 'western-ish' area of England.


Last edited by samivel on Sat Jan 26, 2008 9:54 am; edited 1 time in total

 
Davini994
265798.  Sat Jan 26, 2008 9:27 am Reply with quote

Peregrine Arkwright wrote:
...

lol!

 
Ameena
265834.  Sat Jan 26, 2008 10:08 am Reply with quote

Lol, well it was west of where we were anyway...can't remember exactly how far ;).

 
Peregrine Arkwright
266166.  Sun Jan 27, 2008 6:39 am Reply with quote

Davini994 wrote:
Peregrine Arkwright wrote:
...

lol!


Did I? How verbose.

Peregrine Arkwright

 
Sam_Rothstein
266177.  Sun Jan 27, 2008 7:07 am Reply with quote

Peregrine Arkwright wrote:
.

I've been investigating the north Yorkshire place names listed above.

Appleton Wiske
A model village based on Bournville which pursued an early attempt to develop a cider champagne from the Dales. It failed when the technology crumbled and there were no apples.

Thornton-le-Beans
Another early attempt at Yorkshire food production which failed, so they went over to chocolate instead.

The golden rule about true Yorkshire Food is that it has to begin with 'P', thus pikelets, parkin, pork pies, pickled onions, Pontefract Cakes and Pease Pudding . This vital principle was ignored by those gastronomic pioneers.

Peregrine Arkwright


I don't think that Pease Pudding is really a Yorkshire delicacy, you have the good people of the North East to thank for that.

 

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