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Outlandish place names

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bobwilson
504282.  Sat Feb 14, 2009 8:36 pm Reply with quote

There's also a rather fabulous pair of signposts in Norfolk that read

Brancaster
Staithe

(in one direction)

and
Houghton
Billesdon
Tilton
Bushby

(in the other)

which I always thought would make a fabulous pair of characters in an Edwardian play. Particularly since they are close to the River Nar (you couldn't make it up) near Heacham Beeches.

 
Posital
504316.  Sat Feb 14, 2009 11:17 pm Reply with quote

There's a Calle Benjamin Hill in Mexico City. But the real Benjamin Hill resides further North in Sonora. I'd love to think the locals call it Benny Hill and...

 
Ptraci
525426.  Sat Mar 21, 2009 9:59 am Reply with quote

North Creake and South Creake, Nr Southgate, Fakenham, Norfolk

Tuttington, Norfolk (which is quite close to Burgh & Tuttington, Norfolk).

Seaton Burn, Newcastle Upon Tyne.

Low Wham, Bishop Auckland

 
James Random
525717.  Sun Mar 22, 2009 5:23 am Reply with quote

There's a book entitled 'The Meaning of Liff', by Douglas Adams which has a whole host of rather amusing and outlandish place names in them. My two favourites are Scrabby and Symmonds Yat.

 
Jenny
525947.  Sun Mar 22, 2009 5:22 pm Reply with quote

I think you'll find that The Meaning of Liff is by not only Douglas Adams but also John Lloyd, the founding father of the whole QI enterprise. There's a thread in QI Lists for Liffs.

 
bobwilson
526112.  Sun Mar 22, 2009 10:45 pm Reply with quote

Quote:
Try anything. Remember: A lone amateur built the Ark while a team of professionals built the Titanic


I think James' signature is a good one.

 
James Random
526116.  Mon Mar 23, 2009 12:32 am Reply with quote

bobwilson wrote:
Quote:
Try anything. Remember: A lone amateur built the Ark while a team of professionals built the Titanic


I think James' signature is a good one.


My other signature says. 'Never, under any circumstances, take a laxative and a sleeping pill on the same night'.

 
Peregrine Arkwright
605477.  Sun Aug 30, 2009 6:06 am Reply with quote

.

I've just re-found the comment above about Symonds Yat.

Mrs Arkwright took me to Symond's Yat during our summer peregrinations. It is actually a high bluff overlooking meanders in the River Wye, right on the English-Welsh border, and quite one of the most picturesque inland spots I've seen in those two lands.

None of which helps explain what a 'Yat' is. Does anyone on here know? The site is very old, basically an overgrown Iron Age fort.

Peregrine Arkwright

 
samivel
605563.  Sun Aug 30, 2009 11:18 am Reply with quote

According to this site, yat is an old local word for a gate or pass.

 
orablu
605566.  Sun Aug 30, 2009 11:35 am Reply with quote

James Random wrote:
bobwilson wrote:
Quote:
Try anything. Remember: A lone amateur built the Ark while a team of professionals built the Titanic


I think James' signature is a good one.


My other signature says. 'Never, under any circumstances, take a laxative and a sleeping pill on the same night'.


i thought you should try anything...

 
Peregrine Arkwright
608902.  Sun Sep 06, 2009 8:29 am Reply with quote

.

To quote from:http://www.visitherefordshire.co.uk/explore/explore_symondsyat.asp

Symonds Yat
High above towers Yat Rock, a limestone outcrop 500 feet high. One of the most featured views in England extends in almost every direction as the river winds through a heavily-wooded gorge in a horseshoe bend around the rock. Peregrines have nested on the cliffs for many years until the population was decimated by the effects of pesticides and robbery from the nests.


That probably explains why I liked it so much.

Peregrine Arkwright

 
Bondee
608911.  Sun Sep 06, 2009 8:57 am Reply with quote

Peregrine Arkwright wrote:
That probably explains why I liked it so much.


Because you're an egg thief?
; )

 
Pyriform
610531.  Wed Sep 09, 2009 4:49 pm Reply with quote

bobwilson wrote:
There's also a rather fabulous pair of signposts in Norfolk that read

Brancaster
Staithe

(in one direction)

and
Houghton
Billesdon
Tilton
Bushby

(in the other)

By an outlandish coincidence there are places called Houghton(-on-the-Hill), Billesdon, Tilton(-on-the-Hill) and Bushby all within 10km of each other in eastern Leicestershire as well.

 
eddiebaby
640619.  Thu Nov 26, 2009 7:45 am Reply with quote

My mother always went into fits of giggles whenever we passed the sign for "Great Coxswell" - you might have to say it slowly to yourself a couple of times before you gain an insight into her bawdy mind.
It's near Faringdon in Oxfordshire for those who are interested.

 
Celebaelin
640620.  Thu Nov 26, 2009 7:48 am Reply with quote

I fear you have overestimated the level of high-mindedness of the board in general.

 

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