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Frogs

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MatC
314520.  Fri Apr 11, 2008 8:36 am Reply with quote

There are a hell of a lot of frogs in Florida, some of which have terrific names:
http://www.wec.ufl.edu/extension/wildlife_info/frogstoads/rana_grylio.php

 
MatC
314529.  Fri Apr 11, 2008 9:16 am Reply with quote

Can’t find anything about whether newts drink or not ... anybody else know?

 
eggshaped
314533.  Fri Apr 11, 2008 9:26 am Reply with quote

I think that's true of all amphibians, in general, isn't it?

 
MatC
314535.  Fri Apr 11, 2008 9:32 am Reply with quote

I think so, but I can't find anything that says so.

 
eggshaped
314542.  Fri Apr 11, 2008 9:38 am Reply with quote

Well Buffalo zoo says:

Quote:
Amphibians can actually breathe through their skin as well as their lungs. They cannot drink water through their mouths, so they also have the ability to absorb water through their skin.


and California Zoo:

Quote:
All amphibians absorb water through their skin, so the water should always be clean.


But then, I suppose your frog drinks, so it's possible that newts are also exceptions to this rule. I don't think so, though.

A cursory google for newts gives "central pets.com and many like them, who say:

Quote:
salamanders have highly specialized skin that allows the animal to stay hydrated and to extract oxygen from the water. These animals absorb water through their skins rather than drinking it.

 
MatC
314547.  Fri Apr 11, 2008 9:52 am Reply with quote

Excellent, thanks, egg, so that stands up the question: "How much do newts drink?" with the answer "Nothing."

 
MatC
314549.  Fri Apr 11, 2008 9:53 am Reply with quote

In Japan, frogs are a sign of good luck, especially bullfrogs who “are the descendants of a mighty forebear who could suck all the mosquitoes out of a room in a single breath.”

S: “Frogs” by David Badger (Voyageur Press, 1995).

Links: Superheroes.

 
eggshaped
314550.  Fri Apr 11, 2008 9:54 am Reply with quote

I read "somewhere" that according to folklore, if you dream about frogs then it is supposed to signify that you're pregnant.

Not you, Mat, but girls and that.

 
MatC
314554.  Fri Apr 11, 2008 10:01 am Reply with quote

God, you had me worried for a moment there ... !

 
MatC
314581.  Fri Apr 11, 2008 11:03 am Reply with quote

One of the main reasons the various species of “Poison-Arrow Frogs” exude poisons is to kill bacteria and fungi, which would otherwise breed out of control on the frog’s permanently moist skin.

S: “Frogs” by David Badger (Voyageur Press, 1995).

Link to Gen Ig poisonous vs. venomous.

 
MatC
314582.  Fri Apr 11, 2008 11:04 am Reply with quote

“In Europe, violinists have rubbed the skin of toads to prevent their fingers from perspiring.”

S: “Frogs” by David Badger (Voyageur Press, 1995).

 
MatC
314914.  Sat Apr 12, 2008 5:12 am Reply with quote

The two main ways of using toad venom for human recreational purposes are toad smoking and toad licking. The effects are said to range from “a mild buzz” to “a rocket trip into the void.” Which is quite a range, really, by anybody’s standards.

Throughout history, people have used toads as drugs - both recreational and medicinal; in the latter category, they have been prescribed as powdered toad, toad ashes, toad pellets, toad grease, and tincture of toad.

S: “Frogs” by David Badger (Voyageur Press, 1995).

“I say, you haven't any tincture of toad about you, I suppose? That bullfrog salad is doing my guts up something frightful.”

 
MatC
314956.  Sat Apr 12, 2008 7:28 am Reply with quote

Phyllobates terribilis can produce enough toxins to kill 20,000 lab mice - or ten humans. The odd thing about poison frogs is that no-one quite knows where they get their toxins from. It may be something in their diet - they eat insects - or they may be culturing “toxin-producing bacteria on their skins”, but no-one’s sure.

S: “Frogs” by David Badger (Voyageur Press, 1995).

 
dr.bob
315729.  Mon Apr 14, 2008 6:13 am Reply with quote

MatC wrote:
One of the main reasons the various species of “Poison-Arrow Frogs” exude poisons is to kill bacteria and fungi, which would otherwise breed out of control on the frog’s permanently moist skin.

S: “Frogs” by David Badger (Voyageur Press, 1995).


Odd. I wonder why non-poisonous frogs aren't beset with bacteria and fungi, then.

 
MatC
315730.  Mon Apr 14, 2008 6:19 am Reply with quote

Perhaps to do with relative humidity of surroundings, or dangerousness of local bacteria?

 

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