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Frankenstein

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Ian Dunn
224333.  Sat Oct 27, 2007 7:30 am Reply with quote

Quote:
Q: What was the name of Dr. Frankenstein's assistant?
K: Fritz, Igor
A: He did not have an assistant.


In the original novel by Mary Shelley, Frankenstein does not have an assistant. The assistant was first created in stage adaptations of the story, and later appeared in James Whale's 1931 film as "Fritz".

The 1931 film has more differences to the novel than similarities. For example, in the novel, the monster talks, has yellowish skin and long black hair. The novel also has almost no discription of how the monster is brought to life, so the film created the idea of using lightning.

The film was controversal at the time and was banned in Kansas because of supposed "cruelty and tended to debase morals". The line, "Oh, in the name of God! Now I know what it's like to BE God," was almost removed by the censors because it was thought to be blasphemous.

Wikipedia article on Frankenstein
Wikipedia article on the 1931 film

 
King of Quok
224342.  Sat Oct 27, 2007 9:35 am Reply with quote

This becomes even more complicated when you take into account that the received text of Frankenstein was, for years, the one that Percy Shelley had made subtle, but numerous, editorial alterations upon, which was published in 1831. The original publication, of 1818, appeared anonymously, though dedicated to William Godwin, Mary's father, himself a Gothic novelist of note, with Caleb Williams being his most well-known novel. Amongst the significant changes in the 1831 edition were the subtle alterations to the relationship between Frankenstein and his 'creature', giving Frankenstein slightly more wholesome, scientific motives for its creation, as well as the suppression of incestuous undertones in Elizabeth's relationship with Frankenstein.

 
zomgmouse
226222.  Fri Nov 02, 2007 1:07 am Reply with quote

Also, the whole point of the book, or at least one of them, was that it wasn't Frankenstein's monster, but Frankenstein's creature, and that Victor himself was a monster.

That could be a question: "Who is the monster in Frankenstein?", and Alan would go "Well there's only one - and his name's THE MONSTER" (reference to his answer about the moon).

 
ElizabethSterling
226986.  Sun Nov 04, 2007 11:33 am Reply with quote

zomgmouse wrote:
Also, the whole point of the book, or at least one of them, was that it wasn't Frankenstein's monster, but Frankenstein's creature, and that Victor himself was a monster.

That could be a question: "Who is the monster in Frankenstein?", and Alan would go "Well there's only one - and his name's THE MONSTER" (reference to his answer about the moon).
That's a bit tenuous really. Besides, that'd involve researchers actually having to read Frankenstien which just seems cruel.

 
Norfolkian
227418.  Mon Nov 05, 2007 2:38 pm Reply with quote

I have only ever read the 1818 text - anyone have any opinions on which version is the better read?

 
King of Quok
227445.  Mon Nov 05, 2007 3:47 pm Reply with quote

The 1818 text, before Percy fiddled with it. Caleb Williams is a good read, if you don't want to read Frankenstein again, as is Matthew Lewis' The Monk, if you like your Gothic literature gory and OTT!

 
samivel
227516.  Tue Nov 06, 2007 1:10 am Reply with quote

I agree that the 1818 text is best.

 
Mr Grue
228511.  Wed Nov 07, 2007 12:36 pm Reply with quote

Stewart Lee pointed out that it is not uncommon for inventors to name their inventions after themselves, so referring to Frankenstein's creation as Frankenstein may not be wrong after all. I don't think he was being serious though.

Mary Shelley finished writing Frankenstein in Marlow, in Buckinghamshire.

When James Whale died a rumour went 'round Hollywood that he had had his brains bashed in with a... um... metal device of dubious purpose. There appears to be no truth to this, however. Gods and Monsters, an imagined friendship between James Whale and his hunky gardener is well worth a read/viewing. The film version was produced by Clive Barker, who actually stumped up his own money to (if memory serves) ensure it was shot on 35mm film - it is very rare for film-makers to use their own money. Whale was played by Ian McKellen. One of the suggestions made in the film was that Whale's Frankenstein was deliberately flamboyantly camp, and that this in turn was connected to the horrors that Whale endured in the first world war.

 
suze
228520.  Wed Nov 07, 2007 1:08 pm Reply with quote

Mr Grue wrote:
When James Whale died a rumour went 'round Hollywood that he had had his brains bashed in with a... um... metal device of dubious purpose.


A gun?? What an odd thing to use as a murder weapon.

Why didn't they just use a solid gold dildo like everyone else?

 
Mr Grue
228615.  Wed Nov 07, 2007 6:31 pm Reply with quote

Bo! His suicide was hushed up at the time so the situation was ripe for salacious rumours involving hustlers...

 
ElizabethSterling
228951.  Thu Nov 08, 2007 4:50 pm Reply with quote

King of Quok wrote:
The 1818 text, before Percy fiddled with it. Caleb Williams is a good read, if you don't want to read Frankenstein again, as is Matthew Lewis' The Monk, if you like your Gothic literature gory and OTT!
That's the first time I've ever seen anyone reccomend what is one of the most infamously trashy pieces of gothica ever written.

 
Jenny
229303.  Fri Nov 09, 2007 1:55 pm Reply with quote

But it's old, Elizabeth, and you have to admit it has kitsch value.

 
ElizabethSterling
229550.  Sat Nov 10, 2007 12:41 pm Reply with quote

I admit nothing, being a second year English undergraduate means I'm exposed to these horrible texts on a day to day basis.

 
samivel
229553.  Sat Nov 10, 2007 12:46 pm Reply with quote

It could be worse, you know - you may be made to read Samuel Richardson's Clarissa.

 
MinervaMoon
229558.  Sat Nov 10, 2007 1:15 pm Reply with quote

Frankenstein was the first "real" book I ever read, following up on the Berenstain Bears. It wasn't the 1818 text, though; more like the 1991 Abridged text. But that's not bad for a four year old.

Have yet to read the unabridged Shelley, but it's on the list.

 

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