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blue parking badges

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hotwheels
254125.  Mon Jan 07, 2008 9:13 pm Reply with quote

is it igronance on my part to think that everyone with a blue parking badge needs to or has the right to park in wide parking disable bays at super markets when they don't use a wheelchair? i don't understand this. i use a wheelchair and cannot get in or out of my car without the space that a wide bay offers me, yet i see people getting in and out of there cars quite ablebodied and toddle off in to a shop that takes at least an hour to walk around , so why these people need these bays or even to park close to the shop i will never now. i have had a blue badge for over 12 years and only started to use it at supermarkets about 5 years ago when i could no longer walk myself. i think people in wheelchairs should have a diffrent coloured badge from non wheelchair users. and blue badge non wheel chair users should think twice before parking in thst wie bay when a normal bay would do, plus the bays i use in my tesco are further away from the shop.

 
Jenny
254131.  Mon Jan 07, 2008 10:14 pm Reply with quote

Not everybody who is disabled needs to use a wheelchair - sometimes they just need to not have to walk far. However, the closest spaces to a shop are reserved for disabled people and therefore have the wide bays in case those people are also wheelchair users.

I remember taking my mother in law shopping for clothes not long before she died of congestive heart failure. She could not walk far without resting but didn't have a wheelchair. We needed to park as near to the shop as we could get or she wouldn't have made it.

I agree that able-bodied people who misuse the blue badges are arseholes though.

 
Hummingbird
254183.  Tue Jan 08, 2008 4:26 am Reply with quote

I was amazed to learn that those with badges can park on yellow lines without penalty.

I was rather annoyed. I understood that no parking zones where there because it was judged unsafe to have cars blocking the road.

 
themoog
254194.  Tue Jan 08, 2008 4:40 am Reply with quote

The double yellow lines are open to some confusion. You can of course park on them for loading/unloading. If it's dangerous to stop there at all there will be the two perpendicular yellow lines on the kerb. These appear for example near junctions.

I've never been quite sure why blue badge holders are permitted to park (rather than just load/unload) on double yellows or why it's not necessary to buy a ticket when parked in a space that normally needs one.

 
mikeyfone
254343.  Tue Jan 08, 2008 9:13 am Reply with quote

themoog wrote:
The double yellow lines are open to some confusion. You can of course park on them for loading/unloading. If it's dangerous to stop there at all there will be the two perpendicular yellow lines on the kerb. These appear for example near junctions.

I've never been quite sure why blue badge holders are permitted to park (rather than just load/unload) on double yellows or why it's not necessary to buy a ticket when parked in a space that normally needs one.


It is illegal for anyone to park where they cause a hazard to other road users. Parking on a bend or within 10 metres of a junction could be a 3 point offence. However, the police never seem to enforce it.

Both of my Grandfathers and my Dad have blue badges because they cannot walk far. The blue badge my Dad has allows him to park closer to his jobs, which means he does not have to cart his tools as far he would have to, enabling him to continue working and stay off the dole.

My friend is 22 and has been in a wheelchair all his life. His local railway station is Victorian and does have wheelchair access. The local bus service is expensive and irregular. Thus, without his car he is reliant on others with cars. For him, his car is a necessity, whereas I could use a variety of forms of transport.

 
bobwilson
762195.  Wed Nov 24, 2010 1:23 am Reply with quote

The "Blue Badge" scheme has its origins in a suggestion made by a Dutch anarchist collective. The idea was one that I think everyone here would recognise - some people need special dispensation to park in places normally restricted, and provision needs to be made for some people to have reserved parking.

Unfortunately, human nature being what it is, the rapid adoption of the idea has been overtaken by the pure selfishness of people.

On the whole the Blue Badge scheme has not been abused - but the combination of a few instances of unnecessarily selfish behaviour by legitimate BB holders (they're just as likely to be stupid as the rest of us), misuse of BB by unscrupulous people, and gratuitous reporting by the usual suspects, has led to the scheme coming into disrepute.

Both Hummingbird and themoog are wrong

Nobody can park on Double Yellow lines without penalty. That includes police, fire and ambulance vehicles (except in some very specific circumstances - notably, if the entire road is cordoned). It is at the discretion of the enforcing authority to decide whether to issue a penalty notice. There are no statutory exemptions.

mikey is quite right - "It is illegal for anyone to park where they cause a hazard to other road users." Again, there are NO statutory exemptions.

Enforcement of parking restrictions is at the discretion of the local authority.

 
suze
762364.  Wed Nov 24, 2010 11:55 am Reply with quote

bobwilson wrote:
Nobody can park on Double Yellow lines without penalty. That includes police, fire and ambulance vehicles (except in some very specific circumstances - notably, if the entire road is cordoned).


Strictly, this is true. But it's at least arguable (never been to court, as far as I know) that to clamp an emergency service vehicle which was parked on yellow lines would be an offence under the Emergency Workers (Obstruction) Act 2006.

Even so, it has happened a handful of times, and been duly reported in the sections of the media that you'd expect. While the clamping contractors involved have always said publicly in response to such incidents "We don't care who they are, they can't park there", I rather imagine that the police have then visited the managers of these companies and made matters clear in words of one syllable.

 
astrobumpkin
762389.  Wed Nov 24, 2010 1:57 pm Reply with quote

There seems to be some confusion about double yellow lines... There is always the condition that no obstruction shaal be caused

To clarify the situation may I quote.

http://www.direct.gov.uk/
The full version and info URL is at the end... If you go there you an also download a PDF version

About the scheme

The Blue Badge Scheme only applies to on-street parking.

Badge holders may park on single or double yellow lines for up to three hours in England and Wales, except where there is a ban on loading or unloading.

There is no time limit for parking on yellow lines in Scotland. Where a time limit is in force, you must display both the Blue Badge and the blue parking clock, set to show when you arrived.

Badge holders may park for free and for as long as they need to at on-street parking meters and pay-and-display machines.

While the scheme operates throughout the UK, there are small variations in its application in England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland. Please see the relevant website for further information. The information on this page relates to England unless specified.

http://www.direct.gov.uk/en/disabledpeople/motoringandtransport/dg_4001061

 
PDR
762427.  Wed Nov 24, 2010 5:17 pm Reply with quote

bobwilson wrote:
Nobody can park on Double Yellow lines without penalty.


At the risk of sounding pedantic - this is wrong, Bob. Where yellow lines are present, and in the absence of qualifying curb markings, you're allowed to "park", but you're not allowed to "Wait". You may park for the purpose of loading and unloading, or to allow passengers to board or alight, but you may not wait. Blue badge holders are legally exempt from these restrictions for specified periods. All of this is also subject to a requirement not to cause a hazard.

All of this is clearly laid out in the highway code, with the relevant references to the legislation concerned.

PDR

 
Posital
762465.  Wed Nov 24, 2010 10:19 pm Reply with quote

bobwilson wrote:
Nobody can park on Double Yellow lines without penalty.
I've done it many times. Go figger.

 
Jenny
762591.  Thu Nov 25, 2010 12:04 pm Reply with quote

Maybe the OP should read "Nobody can park on double yellow lines without penalty, if a traffic warden happens to see them"?

 
suze
762593.  Thu Nov 25, 2010 12:10 pm Reply with quote

Wearing my English teaching pedant's hat, we could alternatively replace bob's can with may.

Did anyone else have an elderly female relative who found it incredibly amusing to say "You can, but you may not"?

 
Jenny
762618.  Thu Nov 25, 2010 1:17 pm Reply with quote

My mum.

 
suze
762625.  Thu Nov 25, 2010 1:35 pm Reply with quote

In my case it was my maternal grandmother. She'd spent her first forty years in Edinburgh before going to Canada, and she talked somewhat like Miss Jean Brodie (who in turn talked strangely like Professor McGonagall ...).

Somehow, this made it even more infuriating!

 
Droid
762754.  Fri Nov 26, 2010 6:43 am Reply with quote

I know I ought to keep quiet, but my wife says it.

 

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