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F*** (Please read before deleting)

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Lee Gzyl
254774.  Wed Jan 09, 2008 3:44 am Reply with quote

I've heard of the Great Australian Bugger all... although it replaced the B with an F... which brings us nicely back to this threads title!! It's supposedly used by Royal Australian Air Force pilots.

 
Sobriquet
255393.  Wed Jan 09, 2008 8:33 pm Reply with quote

Hmm, interesting topic. As a sidenote, a universal curse-word substitute which is occasionally used in certain places where electronic security tokens are common is "fob," which is said to stand for "For Opening Buildings" but doesn't actually mean anything. It works quite well actually, and makes people giggle when you say "mother-fobbing..." ;)

How about "RAS Syndrome" i.e. "Redundant Acronym Syndrome Syndrome," used to describe the usage of phrases like "PIN Number," "HIV Virus," or worst of all, "ATM Machine."

 
dr.bob
255461.  Thu Jan 10, 2008 5:54 am Reply with quote

Sobriquet wrote:
How about "RAS Syndrome" i.e. "Redundant Acronym Syndrome Syndrome," used to describe the usage of phrases like "PIN Number," "HIV Virus," or worst of all, "ATM Machine."


Oooh, don't get me started! If you ever hear a news report about how I was arrested for murdering a shop assistant, you'll all know that I was just asked for my "PIN Number" one time too often :)

 
Lee Gzyl
256019.  Fri Jan 11, 2008 3:47 am Reply with quote

Theres a great word which describes the use of things like "PIN number".... Tautology.

 
OldCodger
264449.  Wed Jan 23, 2008 5:04 pm Reply with quote

Sadurian Mike wrote:
Whilst I was a Prison Hospital Officer we used to write up some of the patients suffering mental illness as "MAF". Generally this meant they were going to be referred to external psychiatrists and probably sectioned to external secure hospitals, because the meaning was "Mad As F***".


My wife (a hospital consultant) assures me that more than a few very sick patients have been described by senior hospital staff as being "TF Bundy".

Totally F****d, BUt Not Dead Yet.

Other's that have appeared in the notes include "NFN" (normal for Norfolk) and FLK (funny looking kid). Obviously, political correctness hadn't yet become trendy...

Regards,

Glenn.

 
Sadurian Mike
264559.  Wed Jan 23, 2008 8:14 pm Reply with quote

OldCodger wrote:
Sadurian Mike wrote:
Whilst I was a Prison Hospital Officer we used to write up some of the patients suffering mental illness as "MAF". Generally this meant they were going to be referred to external psychiatrists and probably sectioned to external secure hospitals, because the meaning was "Mad As F***".


My wife (a hospital consultant) assures me that more than a few very sick patients have been described by senior hospital staff as being "TF Bundy".

Totally F****d, BUt Not Dead Yet.

Other's that have appeared in the notes include "NFN" (normal for Norfolk) and FLK (funny looking kid). Obviously, political correctness hadn't yet become trendy...

Regards,

Glenn.

lol, why does none of that surprise me?

 
austinallegro
265761.  Sat Jan 26, 2008 8:08 am Reply with quote

Hooray! I now have a reason to shoehorn this in!

The inscription on the gravestone of John Laird McCaffery, died 14th August 1995:

 
Efros
265945.  Sat Jan 26, 2008 2:10 pm Reply with quote

austinallegro wrote:
Hooray! I now have a reason to shoehorn this in!

The inscription on the gravestone of John Laird McCaffery, died 14th August 1995:



Is that in Glasgow? Nice acrostic!

 
austinallegro
270172.  Sun Feb 03, 2008 1:20 pm Reply with quote

Nope. He's in Canada- the tombstone can be found at
Section C, Plot 01369 of Montreal's Cimetiere Notre-Dame -des-Neiges.

Apparently the stonemason on the tombstone didn't notice the hidden message when the man's wife and mistress placed the order together for the stone.
They claimed the meaning of the poem was just a personal matter between the three of them.

 
QiScorpion
270238.  Sun Feb 03, 2008 3:50 pm Reply with quote

That tombstone is awesome. A subtle snub at Christianity perhaps, but awesome all the same.

PIN Number...
ATM Machine...

(a friend's personal message on msn)= Stupidly high unit morale is stupidly high.

Don't you just love tautology?

 
Confucius
270353.  Sun Feb 03, 2008 6:49 pm Reply with quote

Lee Gzyl wrote:
I've heard of the Great Australian Bugger all... although it replaced the B with an F... which brings us nicely back to this threads title!! It's supposedly used by Royal Australian Air Force pilots.


GSFA was used by the RAF during Gulf War I, much to the confusion of our American allies.

UK: "...out over the GSFA..."
USA: "is GSFA some kinda codeword we don't know about?"
UK: "Great Saudi F*** All"

GCFA often used whilst flying over more northerly continental American features: Great Canadian F*** All

 
Arcane
270409.  Mon Feb 04, 2008 2:40 am Reply with quote

i don't use acronyms but phrases adapted from a friend of mine who used to work in catering. they are surprisingly effective when you feel the need to swear but have small people around:

holy shiitake mushrooms.
fudge muffin sundaes
pooh bum wee (this may need to be muttered under the breath)

 
swot
270589.  Mon Feb 04, 2008 7:24 am Reply with quote

reddygirl wrote:
holy shiitake mushrooms
fudge muffin sundaes
pooh bum wee (this may need to be muttered under the breath)


*makes notes* I almost audibly let a real one slip during youth band practice this week.

 
'yorz
485723.  Wed Jan 21, 2009 11:31 am Reply with quote

suze wrote:
In that case, "snafu" is a hit, and the etymology is not in dispute. Which is more than can be said for "fubar" - derivation from the German furchtbar (terrible) is posited for that one besides the usual acronymic explanation.

.


Killing time I came across the above.


Mrs Byrne's Dictionary
ISBN 0 246 11151 8

says:

snafu: Situation Normal: All Fucked-Up
fubar: Fucked-Up Beyond All Recognition
fubb: Fucked-Up Beyond Belief
fumtu: Fucked-Up More Than Usual
janfu: Joint Army and Navy Fuck-Up
sapfu: Surpassing All Previous Fuck-Ups
susfu: Situation Unchanged: Still Fucked-Up
tarfu: Things Are Really Fucked-Up

Snafu and Sapfu are regulars in our household (when discussing work...)


Last edited by 'yorz on Wed Jan 21, 2009 4:47 pm; edited 1 time in total

 
exnihilo
485870.  Wed Jan 21, 2009 12:32 pm Reply with quote

suze wrote:
Yes, there are plenty in the field of computing - although even there spurious ones also exist (TWAIN, for instance, as was noted somewhere on these forums yesterdau). There are a fair few in other fields of technology as well (LASER).

But Mat's original question was about slang rather than technical terms, and I can't immediately think of one. Does anyone actually use the word "snafu"?

I shall keep thinking though, because I'm sure there must be at least one.


It's not gained common currency yet, but a common one when I was at university, and used to this day among friends of mine from the same era, was osmog. Which stood for oh sweet mother of god and which is pronounced oz-mog. As you can imagine, it's an exclamation of surprise or disbelief, or sometimes contempt.

 

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