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Fraud/Fakes/Falsehoods/Fakirs

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eggshaped
310535.  Fri Apr 04, 2008 7:42 am Reply with quote

Link to FARTING. Didn't Swift write a pamphlet about the benefits of farting to women?

 
MatC
310555.  Fri Apr 04, 2008 8:01 am Reply with quote

Yup: post 285116

 
eggshaped
313275.  Wed Apr 09, 2008 8:21 am Reply with quote

Flying Carpets

Prof Lakshminarayanan Mahadevan of Harvard University in Cambridge has looked at the aerodynamics of a flexible, rippling sheet moving through a fluid, such as air.

In theory, if one vibrates the carpet enough, it will stay aloft.

Sciency bit:

Quote:
The key to levitating a carpet is to create uplift by making ripples that push against air close to a horizontal surface, such as a floor. The undulating movements create a high pressure in the gap between the carpet and the floor, "roughly balancing its weight."

The magical part comes from the discovery that, as well as lifting it, the ripples can drive the carpet forward


He has so far shown that flying is practical for a bank note sized carpet about 0.1 millimetres thick. You'd need to vibrate it at about ten times per second with an amplitude of about 0.25 millimetres.

For a carpet-sized carpet, the specifications are currently prohiibitive, but as many scientists say; as long as something doesn't violate any laws of physics then it is not only likely, but it is certain that it will one day be made.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/earth/main.jhtml?xml=/earth/2007/12/19/scicarpet119.xml

 
Flash
313286.  Wed Apr 09, 2008 8:38 am Reply with quote

Excellent. The article doesn't say how they create the ripples. Presumably some kind of rippling device built into the carpet?

 
Flash
313290.  Wed Apr 09, 2008 8:45 am Reply with quote

Mat, I can't find your story about the carpets being dropped onto Norfolk at the end of the war - can you link to it?

 
MatC
313338.  Wed Apr 09, 2008 9:46 am Reply with quote

This are he: post 307311

 
WB
313402.  Wed Apr 09, 2008 10:57 am Reply with quote

eggshaped wrote:
Flying Carpets

Prof Lakshminarayanan Mahadevan of Harvard University in Cambridge has looked at the aerodynamics of a flexible, rippling sheet moving through a fluid, such as air.

In theory, if one vibrates the carpet enough, it will stay aloft.

Sciency bit:

Quote:
The key to levitating a carpet is to create uplift by making ripples that push against air close to a horizontal surface, such as a floor. The undulating movements create a high pressure in the gap between the carpet and the floor, "roughly balancing its weight."

The magical part comes from the discovery that, as well as lifting it, the ripples can drive the carpet forward


He has so far shown that flying is practical for a bank note sized carpet about 0.1 millimetres thick. You'd need to vibrate it at about ten times per second with an amplitude of about 0.25 millimetres.

For a carpet-sized carpet, the specifications are currently prohiibitive, but as many scientists say; as long as something doesn't violate any laws of physics then it is not only likely, but it is certain that it will one day be made.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/earth/main.jhtml?xml=/earth/2007/12/19/scicarpet119.xml


I think that this links to my post about the Indian Rope Trick post 304284 where they made bits of curtain wire stand on end by vibrating them up & down!

 
MatC
315694.  Mon Apr 14, 2008 4:50 am Reply with quote

Quick footnote to lookalikes (above)

Quote:
Between the 17th and 20th centuries, Tibet was convulsed by political conflicts, intrigues, coups, counter-coups and assassinations. One Dalai Lama’s death was kept secret by the regent for 10 years and a lookalike was employed.


S: Morning Star, 2 April 08

 
eggshaped
319117.  Fri Apr 18, 2008 5:21 am Reply with quote

45% of women, as opposed to just 10% of men, gave their computer passwords to individuals masquerading as market researchers – with the lure of a chocolate bar for completing the survey.

The survey was conducted outside Liverpool Street Station in the City of London among office workers

linky

 
dr.bob
319165.  Fri Apr 18, 2008 6:09 am Reply with quote

Which nicely proves the point that you should never bother spending more money on IT security than it takes to bribe someone to give you their password.

 
MatC
319167.  Fri Apr 18, 2008 6:13 am Reply with quote

Conmen's memoirs always say that, don't they? That "social engineering" is more useful in a con than any number of brilliant scams or technology.

 
96aelw
321633.  Mon Apr 21, 2008 6:49 pm Reply with quote

There was something of a vogue for fake fakirs in the 19th century. A lot of magicians performed not only under stage names, but under stage nationalities as well; Colonel Stodare was an interesting example of the genre, in that he pretended to be French, but pretending to be Indian or Chinese seems ot have been more standard. Isaiah Harris Hughes, an Essex man, moved to the US, where he performed in 1854 as the "Fakir of Avar, Chief of Staff of Conjurors to His Sublime Greatness the Nanka of Aristaphae". Professor Pepper, of "'s Ghost" fame had an assistant, Alfred Silvester, who went on to become the "Fakir of Oolu" (there is no such place as Oolu). Most impressively, Chung Ling Soo (the name and much of the act being based on the contemporary and genuinely Chinese Ching Ling Foo), was the stage name of the American William Robinson, who found the name better than his earlier effort "Robinson, the Man of Mystery". It is widely reported (i.e. here) that he kept the persona up completely, never speaking on stage, and always talking to journalists through an interpreter. He died on stage in London when his "catch a bullet in the teeth" trick went wrong, having time, say some reports, to finally break radio silence and say something ("Oh my God. Something's happened. Lower the curtain") before he snuffed it.

S: The Rise of the Indian Rope Trick, Peter Lamont.


Last edited by 96aelw on Mon Apr 28, 2008 8:23 am; edited 2 times in total

 
96aelw
321635.  Mon Apr 21, 2008 6:52 pm Reply with quote

The best fake fakir, though (almost forgot him), must be the man Lamont credits with being the first. In 1849, "The Unparallelled Necromancer Rhia Rhama Rhoos" performed at a charity show for children at Bonchurch on the Isle of Wight, duly blacked up and dressed in suitably exotic robes. He was, of course not Indian at all, and his real name was not so much Rhia Rhama Rhoos as Charles Dickens.

 
Frederick The Monk
322495.  Wed Apr 23, 2008 2:54 am Reply with quote

Lovely - note to self - Rhia Rhama Rhoos for notes / questions (FAKES AND FRAUDS)

 
Flash
322733.  Wed Apr 23, 2008 7:05 am Reply with quote

The posters for Derren Brown's current stage show (which Will is working on) show him dressed as an oriental mystic in a turban.

 

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