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Longest/highest scoring word on Scrabble

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melville88
907100.  Sat May 05, 2012 6:44 pm Reply with quote

After watching QI on Friday night, I decided I would have a go at getting that highest scoring word on Scrabble! I HAVE DONE IT!!! I scored 1526 points, but I am sure Stephen Fry said it should be 1700+? I think I must have put the letters in the wrong order but I don't know how else I could have done it? Sorry to post on here but the climax of actually completing this challenge made me very happy :-D! Go QI! xxx

 
suze
907103.  Sat May 05, 2012 7:15 pm Reply with quote

If I remember rightly, the show said that the word was OXYPHENBUTAZONE. A number of people have contrived ways to score lots and lots of points with it; the highest so far verified is 1,785.

OXYPHENBUTAZONE is an organic chemical compound, systematic name (RS)-4-butyl-1-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-2-phenylpyrazolidine-3,5-dione.)

There is a group of Scrabblists who spend far too long trying to find ways to beat this. A lot of them revolve around the word SESQUIOXIDIZING, and scores of well over 2,000 have been reported. Unfortunately, none of the various Scrabble word lists in use permit the word SESQUIOXIDIZING.

Again it's a term from chemistry. If you perform a reaction which leads to the production of a sesquioxide - alumina is one of those - then you are SESQUIOXIDIZING. Unfortunately, the only dictionary known to include this word is a 1984 publication called Mrs Byrne's Dictionary of Unusual, Obscure, and Preposterous Words. (Josefa Byrne, who compiled this work, is the daughter of the violinist Jascha Heifetz, and has some considerable reputation in the rarefied world of Theoretical Scrabble.)


The highest verified score ever actually made in one turn in a serious game is 392, which revolved around the word CAZIQUES. This was made by Karl Khoshnaw, a Kurdish German university lecturer who played at World's Championship level in the 90s. Sadly, Dr Khoshnaw died in 2006, but his record set in 1982 still stands.

 
'yorz
907107.  Sat May 05, 2012 7:48 pm Reply with quote

I used to have a copy of Mrs Byrne's Dictionary. That's where I found the various applications for the fu's - snafu, sapfu, janfu, etc, of which pages I kept photocopies. And last night I read them out to somebody, and for the life of me couldn't remember whose dictionary that was.
What a coincidence.
Thanks, suze :-)

 
Jumper
907126.  Sat May 05, 2012 10:25 pm Reply with quote

And I always thought the longest Scrabble word you could put down was SMILES...

 
bobwilson
907127.  Sat May 05, 2012 10:43 pm Reply with quote

I'd say that it's (probably) impossible to compute the maximum score in Scrabble -

Consider - the letters already in place along the bottom row are such that a 15 letter word is possible given the addition of seven judiciously placed letters.

Assuming that this includes placement on all three of the triple word score squares this could complete (in theory) two vertical 15 letter words at each end (both of which would attract triple word scores).

In addition a third vertical 15 letter word could be completed.

Plus, of course, another four vertical words.

 
suze
907177.  Sun May 06, 2012 7:56 am Reply with quote

You're basically right, bob.

What we could do easily enough is to determine the highest score possible from a single turn, if we were to ignore the pesky constraint that all the words formed have to be in the specified reference list. There are those who play a Scrabble variant whereby one can indeed put down any sequence of letters one cares to, regardless of whether or not they form words. That's not as easy as it sounds, and has more to do with mathematics than with Scrabble.

But to go from that to the maximum possible with that constraint is a much more difficult task. The number of possibilities is very large, and it would be an impossible task for a human to go through them all. When it comes down to it it's an exercise in optimization, and so I'm sure that a computer could do it - but I suspect that it would take a very long time.

Those who play around with OXYPHENBUTAZONE generally play it down the left hand side of the board. Most use the final E to turn JACULATING (throwing) into EJACULATING (whose meaning I surely need not explain).

SESQUIOXIDIZING is usually played down the right hand side of the board, with the Ss, the Is, and the X used to form plurals.

 
cbielich
1027691.  Tue Oct 08, 2013 3:00 pm Reply with quote

melville88 wrote:
After watching QI on Friday night, I decided I would have a go at getting that highest scoring word on Scrabble! I HAVE DONE IT!!! I scored 1526 points, but I am sure Stephen Fry said it should be 1700+? I think I must have put the letters in the wrong order but I don't know how else I could have done it? Sorry to post on here but the climax of actually completing this challenge made me very happy :-D! Go QI! xxx


You can also see a list of all the highest scoring words in scrabble here http://www.freescrabbledictionary.com/word-lists/highest-scoring-words/

 
Jenny
1027839.  Wed Oct 09, 2013 8:53 am Reply with quote

Welcome cbielich :-)

 

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