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mondegreens - or song lyrics you got really, really wrong

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Rudolph Hucker
224132.  Fri Oct 26, 2007 11:06 am Reply with quote

One I still hear incorrectly apparently goes:

Long to reign o'er us, god save the queen.

I've always thought the words were:

You're a leech on the blood of the hardworking British populace, why don't you and your kin piss off to Germany and ride around on pushbikes.

Strange what a bit of wax in the ears can do...

 
AlmondFacialBar
224133.  Fri Oct 26, 2007 11:07 am Reply with quote

Rudolph Hucker wrote:
One I still hear incorrectly apparently goes:

Long to reign o'er us, god save the queen.

I've always thought the words were:

You're a leech on the blood of the hardworking British populace, why don't you and your kin piss off to Germany and ride around on pushbikes.

Strange what a bit of wax in the ears can do...


hey, you people keep her right there!

:-)

AlmondFacialBar

 
Arcane
224428.  Sun Oct 28, 2007 1:59 am Reply with quote

i am amazed that no-one here gets the australian national anthem wrong all the time.

one of the lines contains "...our home is girt by sea".

girt??? girt means surrounded, or something to that effect)


Last edited by Arcane on Fri Nov 07, 2008 9:47 am; edited 4 times in total

 
samivel
224467.  Sun Oct 28, 2007 9:36 am Reply with quote

I'm amazed by how many people think the Australian national anthem is 'Waltzing Matilda'.

 
petipetra
224468.  Sun Oct 28, 2007 9:42 am Reply with quote

I'm amazed that anyone has actually thought about the Australian anthem.

 
Bondee
224479.  Sun Oct 28, 2007 10:43 am Reply with quote

Askapart wrote:
(2 Unlimited, 1993)


I thought they were called 2 Untalented.
: )

 
Bondee
224480.  Sun Oct 28, 2007 10:46 am Reply with quote

greentree wrote:
'I am the Lord of the Dance settee'

found out many years later, it's 'I am the Lord of the Dance, said he.'

always had a picture of someone dancing on the back of a sofa....


Can't remember the name of the hymn, but it contained the line "Sing Hosanna to the king of kings".

Because of the story of the loaves and fishes, I thought it was "Sing old salmon..."

 
soup
224492.  Sun Oct 28, 2007 12:04 pm Reply with quote

Bondee wrote:

Can't remember the name of the hymn, but it contained the line "Sing Hosanna to the king of kings".



Just call it "Give me oil in my lamp" we will know what you mean.

 
swot
224611.  Mon Oct 29, 2007 4:50 am Reply with quote

samivel wrote:
I'm amazed by how many people think the Australian national anthem is 'Waltzing Matilda'.


I remember being told once that the chap who composed 'Waltzing Matilda' wasn't Australian by birth. Apparently he was from Saddleworth, near Manchester. It's the reason the first movement of the brass band piece 'Saddleworth Variations' has the Waltzing Matilda tune all the way through it. 'Twas rather fun to play actually, despite it being waay too hard.

 
Tas
224632.  Mon Oct 29, 2007 6:01 am Reply with quote

Quote:
Quote:
Askapart wrote:
(2 Unlimited, 1993)



I thought they were called 2 Untalented.
: )


Far 2 Limited, Shirley?

:-)

Tas

 
samivel
224668.  Mon Oct 29, 2007 7:40 am Reply with quote

no1 school swot wrote:
samivel wrote:
I'm amazed by how many people think the Australian national anthem is 'Waltzing Matilda'.


I remember being told once that the chap who composed 'Waltzing Matilda' wasn't Australian by birth. Apparently he was from Saddleworth, near Manchester. It's the reason the first movement of the brass band piece 'Saddleworth Variations' has the Waltzing Matilda tune all the way through it. 'Twas rather fun to play actually, despite it being waay too hard.


He was Andrew Barton 'Banjo' Patterson, and he was definitely an Aussie.

 
Tas
224695.  Mon Oct 29, 2007 9:07 am Reply with quote

Quote:
The words to the song were written in 1895 by Banjo Paterson, a famous Australian poet, and the music was written (based on a folk tune) by Christina Macpherson, who wrote herself that she "was no musician, but she would do her best." Paterson wrote the piece while staying at the Dagworth Homestead, a bush station in Queensland. While he was there his hosts played him a traditional Celtic folk tune called "The Craigeelee," and Paterson decided that it would be a good piece to set lyrics to, producing them during the rest of his stay.

The tune is most probably based on the Scottish song "Thou Bonnie Wood Of Craigielea," which Macpherson heard played by a band at the Warrnambool steeplechase. Robert Tannahill wrote the words in 1805 and James Barr composed the music in 1818. In 1893 it was arranged for brass band by Thomas Bulch. The tune again was possibly based on the old melody of "Go to the Devil and Shake Yourself," composed by John Field (1782-1837) sometime before 1812. It is sometimes also called: "When Sick Is It Tea You Want?" (London 1798) or "The Penniless Traveller" (O'Neill's 1850 collection).

There is also speculation about the relationship it bears to "The Bold Fusilier", a song dated by some back to the eighteenth century.

"Waltzing Matilda" is probably based on the following story:

In Queensland in 1891 the Great Shearers' Strike brought the colony close to civil war and was broken only after the Premier Samuel Griffith called in the military.
In September 1894, on a station called Dagworth (north of Winton), some shearers were again on strike. It turned violent with the strikers firing their rifles and pistols in the air and setting fire to the woolshed at the Dagworth Homestead, killing dozens of sheep.
The owner of Dagworth Homestead and three policemen gave chase to a man named Samuel Hoffmeister - also called Samuel "French(y)" Hoffmeister. Rather than be captured, Hoffmeister shot and killed himself at the Combo Waterhole.
Bob Macpherson (the brother of Christina) and Paterson are said to have taken rides together at Dagworth. Here they may have passed the Combo Waterhole, where Bob may have told this story to Paterson.

The song itself was first performed on 6 April 1895 at the North Gregory Hotel in Winton, Queensland. The occasion was a banquet for the Premier of Queensland. It became an instant success.


Thus spake the great Wiki, regarding Waltzing Matilda.

:-)

Tas

 
Arcane
224921.  Mon Oct 29, 2007 9:54 pm Reply with quote

thanks tas.


Last edited by Arcane on Fri Nov 07, 2008 9:50 am; edited 1 time in total

 
Long Haired Hippy
224952.  Tue Oct 30, 2007 5:23 am Reply with quote

From the demented mind of Adam Buxton

http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=7-ZnPE3G_YY

 
petipetra
224961.  Tue Oct 30, 2007 5:46 am Reply with quote

reddygirl wrote:
note to petipetra - please re-read my post on the australian national anthem for an update - and an explanation as to why i made this post!

I did now where you're from, my post was more in a response to samivel ;)

 

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