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eggshaped
313181.  Wed Apr 09, 2008 6:35 am Reply with quote

According to Havelock Ellis, writing in the New York Times in 1890, in the Middle Ages, when two people were suspected of a crime, they punished "the uglier".

Sound familiar to anyone? Fred perhaps?

**edit, actually it's a review of Ellis's first book "The Criminal".**

 
eggshaped
313185.  Wed Apr 09, 2008 6:39 am Reply with quote

Apparantly a French saying is:

"god preserve me from a beardless man"

s: NYT Aug 3rd 1890

 
eggshaped
313187.  Wed Apr 09, 2008 6:39 am Reply with quote

A Venitian saying:

"Trust not a woman with a man's voice"

fairly good avice I would think, especially in a dark club.

s: ibid

 
eggshaped
313190.  Wed Apr 09, 2008 6:45 am Reply with quote

According to prison reformer William Hepworth Dixon:

Quote:
A handsome face is a thing rarely seen in a prison [...] well formed heads, round and massive, denoting intellectual power may be seen occasionally, but a pleasing, well-formed face never.


s: ibid

 
MatC
313191.  Wed Apr 09, 2008 6:46 am Reply with quote

eggshaped wrote:

"Trust not a woman with a man's voice"


Link to the Thatcher Effect - Mrs Evil was “done” by a male voice on Spitting Image, wasn't she?

 
Flash
313203.  Wed Apr 09, 2008 6:58 am Reply with quote

Late-breaking news: it's true after all:
Quote:
It has been shown that beauty is positively related to earnings in the labor market (Hamermesh and Biddle 1994, Biddle and Hamermesh 1998, Harper 2000, Hamermesh, Meng and Zhang 2002). It has also been shown that better-looking people sort themselves into occupations, and sectors within occupations, where an earnings premium exists on beauty (Hamermesh and Biddle 1994, Biddle and Hamermesh 1998). Persico, Postlewaite and Silverman (2004) demonstrate that taller workers receive a wage premium, which can be traced back to their height in high school, and that this effect is due to the impact of height on participation in high school sports and clubs. Along the same lines, Kuhn and Weinberger (2005) show that leadership skills in high school generate positive wage effects later in life.

These are important and provocative findings regarding the development of a more complete understanding of wage determination, because they underline the significance of non-cognitive factors in determining worker rewards, and also because they point to non-traditional human capital components (e.g. skills acquired through socialization in high school) that are evidently valued in the labor market.

These findings give rise to an interesting hypothesis regarding workers’ response to labor market incentives. If beauty commands a positive earnings premium in the legal labor market, and if criminal activity is a labor market choice of rational agents, where the decision to engage in crime is made by comparing the financial rewards from crime to those obtained from legal work, then it is expected that less attractive people sort themselves into the criminal sector.

In this paper, we provide evidence regarding the impact of beauty on the extent of criminal activity of individuals. Beauty impacts individuals’ interaction with the criminal justice system. The results reveal that, conditional on criminal involvement, attractive females are less likely to get detained. We find that unattractive individuals commit more crime in comparison to average-looking ones, and beautiful individuals commit less crime in comparison to those who are average-looking. This relationship holds for a number of self-reported criminal activity measures.

http://www.aeaweb.org/annual_mtg_papers/2006/0106_0800_0902.pdf[/code]

 
MatC
313205.  Wed Apr 09, 2008 7:00 am Reply with quote

"Self-reported" ... ?

 
eggshaped
313228.  Wed Apr 09, 2008 7:33 am Reply with quote

Quote:
Lack of cranial symmetry is one of the most marked features of the criminal skull.

A prominance of cheek bone has been noted in some classes of criminals.

~Haveleock Ellis

Quote:
I have generally seen with strong animal passions a tendancy to high cheekbones.

~Charles Kingsley

Cesare Lambroso was one of the pioneers of associating features with criminality. He thought that there was a tendancy to an exaggeration of the canines in criminals.

Another theory was that criminals had their ears above 90 degrees on the side of the head. A certain Dr Frigiero claimed that the longest ear he ever measured was on a woman charged with killing her husband.

Because criminals are watchful and distrustful, they were supposed to have wrinkled foreheads.

s: ibid

 
Flash
313280.  Wed Apr 09, 2008 8:28 am Reply with quote

Yes, there seem to be two strands to this: certain types of face which indicate pre-existing character types, and conversely certain character types which influence your face, eg smiley people develop laughter lines.

 
WB
313405.  Wed Apr 09, 2008 11:06 am Reply with quote

According to the Times today (9/4/08) our face gives away our sexual intention:




Spot the difference!

See http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/uk/science/article3708640.ece for more detail

 
Jenny
313411.  Wed Apr 09, 2008 11:20 am Reply with quote

The Times wrote:

Researchers remained puzzled as to why the women most likely to settle for a one-night stand were judged to be the most attractive.


These were female researchers, were they?

 
WB
313425.  Wed Apr 09, 2008 11:54 am Reply with quote

Well the lead researcher is Lynda Boothroyd, so yes.

 
dr.bob
313667.  Thu Apr 10, 2008 4:00 am Reply with quote

eggshaped wrote:
Quote:
Lack of cranial symmetry is one of the most marked features of the criminal skull.


Link to phrenology

 
eggshaped
314543.  Fri Apr 11, 2008 9:39 am Reply with quote

People who are happy, relaxed or exhibit other positive emotions are less likely to catch colds than those who are unhappy or anxious, according to a study by Psychology Professor Sheldon Cohen published in the July 22 (2006) issue of Psychosomatic Medicine.

http://www.cmu.edu/cmnews/030905/030905_asmileday.html

 
Jenny
316840.  Tue Apr 15, 2008 11:40 am Reply with quote

Songwriter Billy Rose, when he was a young man, met some other songwriters in a New York deli. He thought they were "a bunch of dumbheads" until he learned that some of them were earning $50,000 a year. He analyzed every novelty song of the day and decided that all of them had a silly syllable, and that of all the syllables, the sound of oo was the silliest. He wrote a song called Barney Google, "with the goo-goo-googly eyes." The song was a hit and Billy went on to write songs like Without a Song, More Than You Know and It's Only a Paper Moon.

http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,899035,00.html

 

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