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eggshaped
312451.  Tue Apr 08, 2008 6:43 am Reply with quote

Apropos of not very much, there are rare seahorses in the Thames.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/london/7333980.stm

 
eggshaped
313884.  Thu Apr 10, 2008 8:48 am Reply with quote

The fish I mentioned two-up also likes to crawl around rather than swim; similarly there are some species of anglerfish that walk along the sea-floor with their modified pectoral fins.

Maybe good for the killifish notes anyway.

This is the lovely looking fellow:

 
WB
314038.  Thu Apr 10, 2008 11:29 am Reply with quote

eggshaped wrote:
The fish I mentioned two-up also likes to crawl around rather than swim; similarly there are some species of anglerfish that walk along the sea-floor with their modified pectoral fins.


I think that this must be some weird kind of Anglerfish. The usual type is like this:

http://animals.nationalgeographic.com/staticfiles/NGS/Shared/StaticFiles/animals/images/1024/anglerfish.jpg

**pic of anglerfish removed to make thread smaller - egg**

They have a lure dangling over the front of their mouth to attract prey - hence the term angler.

 
eggshaped
314056.  Thu Apr 10, 2008 11:41 am Reply with quote

The spotted handfish, Brachionichthys hirsutus is one such "walking anglerfish".

Other fishes that walk on the sea floor in a similar way are tripodfish Bathypterois grallator, and coffinfish Chaunax endeavouri - but neither of these belong to the Anglerfish order.

 
Flash
314057.  Thu Apr 10, 2008 11:42 am Reply with quote

Isn't there a new theory that it's actually to attract a mate?

 
Flash
315952.  Mon Apr 14, 2008 11:11 am Reply with quote

Gray sends this:
Quote:
Hundreds of retired New York City subway cars are being sunk sixteen nautical miles off Delaware's Indian River Inlet and about 80 feet underwater, continuing the transformation of a barren stretch of ocean floor into a bountiful oasis, carpeted in sea grasses, walled thick with blue mussels and sponges, and teeming with black sea bass and tautog.
'They're basically luxury condominiums for fish,' says Jeff Tinsman, artificial reef program manager for the Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control. Subway cars are roomy enough to invite certain fish, too heavy to shift easily in storms, and durable enough to avoid throwing off debris for decades. Tinsman particularly favors the newer subway cars with stainless steel on the outside to create reefs. 'We call these the DeLoreans of the deep,' he said. But success comes at a price because other states, seeing Delaware's successes, have started competing for the subway cars, which New York City provides free. 'The secret is out, I guess,' said Michael G. Zacchea, the MTA official in charge of getting rid of New York City's old subway cars.
This has been done in 1994 as well, saving the cost of scrapping 6 M-60 Main battle tanks in New Jersey. (Fish-tank gag here, surely, possibly as a predictable forfeit.) New Jersey is expecting about 100 tanks to be distributed along the coast by next year. It is estimated that the entire program will generate $7 million in economic activity for New Jersey over the next half-century.
http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.html?res=9B02E4DD1E30F937A35751C1A962958260

When the US Army left the South Pacific island of Guam after the end of WW2, they thought about paying the British Army to take their tanks away with them, but the Brits thought they could get them all for free, as the Americans would never take them with them. However, the US called their bluff and instead tipped all their tanks and trucks into the sea, where they make a superlative diving spot for the billions of fish that have taken up residence in the new reef.

 
Flash
315955.  Mon Apr 14, 2008 11:13 am Reply with quote

And this:
Quote:
California grunion are small silvery fish found only along the coast of southern California and northern Baja California. Unlike other fish, grunion come out of the water completely to lay their eggs in the wet sand of the beach.

A local sport, which one can only take part in at the full moon on a certain night of the year, is The Gunion Run: "Grunion hunting has become one of the famous sports of southern California. Since these fish leave the water to deposit their eggs, they may be picked up while they are briefly stranded. Racing for fish spotted far down the beach and trying to catch them by hand provides an exhilarating experience for young and old. The common sight of thousands of people lining the more popular beaches in southern California in anticipation of a grunion run attests to its ever growing popularity."

http://www.dfg.ca.gov/marine/grnindx3.asp

 
96aelw
315986.  Mon Apr 14, 2008 12:22 pm Reply with quote

Faintly remeniscent of the south western Scottish activity of flounder tramping, whereby the fish are caught by standing on them. The World Championships are held every summer.

http://www.visitsouthernscotland.co.uk/the-world-flounder-trampling-championships-i2991.html

 
WB
315991.  Mon Apr 14, 2008 12:25 pm Reply with quote

Flash wrote:
And this:
Quote:
California grunion are small silvery fish found only along the coast of southern California and northern Baja California. Unlike other fish, grunion come out of the water completely to lay their eggs in the wet sand of the beach.

A local sport, which one can only take part in at the full moon on a certain night of the year, is The Gunion Run: "Grunion hunting has become one of the famous sports of southern California. Since these fish leave the water to deposit their eggs, they may be picked up while they are briefly stranded. Racing for fish spotted far down the beach and trying to catch them by hand provides an exhilarating experience for young and old. The common sight of thousands of people lining the more popular beaches in southern California in anticipation of a grunion run attests to its ever growing popularity."

http://www.dfg.ca.gov/marine/grnindx3.asp


Was there an episode of Baywatch all about this?

 
eggshaped
319074.  Fri Apr 18, 2008 4:34 am Reply with quote

If a cow goes moo, and a duck goes quack, what noise does a fish make?

Do people generally know that fishes make sounds? According to the New York Times:

Quote:
When Jacques Cousteau titled his 1956 documentary “The Silent World,” [...] he captured the public’s imagination about underwater life while leaving our ears deaf to fish barks, chatter, groans, drones and cries.


Apparantly noisy underwater life interferes with the military’s objectives, researchers who studied this published: “Sounds of Western North Atlantic Fishes: A Reference File of Underwater Biologic Sounds,” which identified the vocalizations of over 150 fish.

Quote:
For most fish, the sonic mechanism is a muscle that vibrates a swim bladder not unlike our vocal cord. The bladder is a gas-filled sac used for buoyancy, but it can also be used as a sort of drum.


In fact:

Quote:
The Gulf toadfish contracts its sonic muscle against its swim bladder thousands of times a minute to generate a loud drone. At nearly three times the average wingbeat of a hummingbird, toadfish have the fastest known muscle of any vertebrate.


Most fish make a kind of drone, but clownfish make a chirp and as we know, herring make a farting tick.

http://www.nytimes.com/2008/04/08/science/08fish.html?_r=2&oref=slogin&oref=slogin

This has promise as quite an amusing question, panellists doing fish impressions has to be funny, but perhaps it suffers from the fact that we've done the herring-farting question before.

 
Molly Cule
331529.  Tue May 06, 2008 10:50 am Reply with quote

Comet and Einstein, the world's most talented goldfish..

shortened link

 
Molly Cule
331603.  Tue May 06, 2008 12:49 pm Reply with quote

According to the Frietmuseum, fries were born in the 1700s. Belgians would catch small fish, fry them and eat them whole but during a severe winter the rivers froze so they cut and fried small fish-shaped potatoes instead.

So, the first chips, were fish. Perhaps I should go to Bruges to check?
http://www.guardian.co.uk/travel/2008/may/03/bruges.foodanddrink

 
Frederick The Monk
332718.  Thu May 08, 2008 9:47 am Reply with quote

I've rarely heard of a better reason for going to Bruge. Could you bring me back a trappist beer?

I think the might be mileage in the food show for chips originally being substitute fish. Needs a snappy question......

 
eggshaped
336936.  Thu May 15, 2008 8:01 am Reply with quote

Eating fish heads can make you hallucinate, it is especially prevalent in Sea Bream and mullet. The scientific term is ichthyoallyeinotoxism and it is down to a compound called indole, which is present in the plankton and algae it eats.

http://www.practicalfishkeeping.co.uk/pfk/pages/item.php?news=911

 
eggshaped
350309.  Mon Jun 02, 2008 4:29 am Reply with quote

Briton Zyg Gregorek, male, 65, is being hailed as the world's greatest fisherman after being the first person in history to have caught all 27 species in the three so-called "royal slams" set by the International Game Fish Association.

That includes nine species of shark, ten billfish and eight tuna.

from The Scotsman

 

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