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Fillings... Nothing More Than Fillings...

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Mr Grue
212811.  Sun Sep 23, 2007 5:18 pm Reply with quote

During the second world war Lucille Ball found herself driving down the street and suddenly started hearing music. She looked at the car radio to switch it off only to find it wasn't on. She drove on, the music got louder, then it faded away. She mentioned the phenomenon to Buster Keaton who told her that the street she was driving down held the transmitter for one of the radio stations in the area. She must, he deduced, have picked up their transmission on her fillings.

Some time later she was driving around town again and started to hear the familiat dit-da-dit-dit of Morse code. She promptly reported this and as a result an underground Japanese radio transmitter station was uncovered.

Lucille Ball explained this to Dick Cavett on his chat show in 1975.


Last edited by Mr Grue on Sun Sep 23, 2007 5:28 pm; edited 1 time in total

 
petipetra
212812.  Sun Sep 23, 2007 5:24 pm Reply with quote

o rly?

seems incredibly unlikely to me.

 
Mr Grue
212814.  Sun Sep 23, 2007 5:25 pm Reply with quote

Why have I put it here and not QI or F series? Damn my stupidity!

 
petipetra
212816.  Sun Sep 23, 2007 5:26 pm Reply with quote

i wouldn't know ;) should be easily moved by a moderator-person.

 
Jenny
212832.  Sun Sep 23, 2007 6:16 pm Reply with quote

<waves magic moderating wand> Abracadabra!

 
Efros
212837.  Sun Sep 23, 2007 6:34 pm Reply with quote

Mythbusters effectively busted this myth and called into question said Miss Ball's (or perhaps Mrs Arnaz's) sanity.

 
Mr Grue
212875.  Mon Sep 24, 2007 2:06 am Reply with quote

Yeah, though Mythbusters just failed to recreate the phenomenon, which isn't a proof negative in itself; I've not seen the show, though, so can't comment at length. It's a difficult one. Lucille Ball was known for her honesty, and she convinces in the Dick Cavett show. That said, had she really uncovered a Japanese spy, would she have been told about it?

Much toing and froing on the matter, Mythbusters included, here.

 
AlmondFacialBar
212903.  Mon Sep 24, 2007 4:50 am Reply with quote

erm... picking up the transmission is one thing, actually being able to hear it is quite another one. you'd need a current and a magnet to amplify it, right? while you might be able to produce a small current in your mouth, between the fillings, saliva and eating something acidic, you still wouldn't have the magnet. so - balderdash! it still made a for great scene in beavis and butthead, though...

:-)

AlmondFacialBar

 
Efros
212933.  Mon Sep 24, 2007 6:45 am Reply with quote

She's woz nuts I tell ye!

 
soup
212949.  Mon Sep 24, 2007 7:29 am Reply with quote

Wasn't there also something about the CIA/FBI (?) didn't have this incident on file so it didn't officially exist. Yes I know official files can go walkabout but you would have thought some file somewhere alluded to it.

 
King of Quok
213300.  Tue Sep 25, 2007 5:45 am Reply with quote

Cole Porter actually made a whole musical out of this, though it's largely forgotten today. Called Something for the Boys, it played Broadway in 1943 and starred Ethel Merman as Blossom Hart who, amongst other wartime shenanigans, discovered that she could pick up enemy radio transmissions on her fillings. The show is largely forgotten, although it was the original home of the songs 'Hey, Good Looking', used countless times on countless adverts, and the supremely filthy 'Leader of a Big-Time Band'.

 
mckeonj
213304.  Tue Sep 25, 2007 5:55 am Reply with quote

King of Quok wrote:
Cole Porter actually made a whole musical out of this, though it's largely forgotten today. Called Something for the Boys, it played Broadway in 1943 and starred Ethel Merman as Blossom Hart who, amongst other wartime shenanigans, discovered that she could pick up enemy radio transmissions on her fillings. The show is largely forgotten, although it was the original home of the songs 'Hey, Good Looking', used countless times on countless adverts, and the supremely filthy 'Leader of a Big-Time Band'.

Lyrics thereof:
Quote:
In the old days, when a maid desired to wed,
Any man who'd foot the bill could fill the bed.
But today the guy who's sure to win her hand
Is the leader of a big-time band.
Even gals who go for wrestlers quit 'em quick
When they meet some guy who sings and swings a stick.
For of late the only date they long to land
Is the leader of a big-time band.
When they hear Harry James
Make with the lips,
The most Colonial dames
Fracture their hips.
So if thee would like to be in great demand,
Be the leader of a big-time band.

 
AlmondFacialBar
213307.  Tue Sep 25, 2007 5:59 am Reply with quote

... and it goes downhill from there. :-D a truly supoib piece of piggery.

:-)

AlmondFacialBar

 
suze
213371.  Tue Sep 25, 2007 9:52 am Reply with quote

I see that that show came out in 1943.

Could it perhaps be that Lucille Ball, not shy of a bit of a self publicity, took the premise of the show and then started telling the world "something just like that happened to me, you know"?

Her official biography has it that the events happened to Miss Ball, who related them to Ethel Merman who in turn passed the story on to Cole Porter, who used it in his show. But I don't really buy that - as already noted, I don't imagine that Miss Ball would have been told about the Japanese installation being discovered. Furthermore, during wartime the authorities would probably have stopped the show being performed if it were based on a true story.

Thirty years on, it's quite plausible that Miss Ball by then believed that it had happened as she describes, so I don't say she was necessarily purposely misleading Dick Cavett.

Then again, in 1975 Dick Cavett had just moved from ABC to CBS and was struggling for ratings (to the extent that his show was cancelled after four editions, and he was off the screens until picked up by PBS a couple years later) - so it's always possible that Miss Ball reciting this story was in some way engineered as a way to get some publicity.

 
Tas
213373.  Tue Sep 25, 2007 9:55 am Reply with quote

Quote:
Then again, in 1975 Dick Cavett had just moved from ABC to CBS and was struggling for ratings (to the extent that his show was cancelled after four editions, and he was off the screens until picked up by PBS a couple years later) - so it's always possible that Miss Ball reciting this story was in some way engineered as a way to get some publicity.


I love a good dose of cynicism me.

:-)

Tas

 

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