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Fascinating F Words

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markvent
208392.  Mon Sep 10, 2007 10:32 am Reply with quote

frankalmoign - from franc meaning free; and almoigne meaning alms.

“Sometimes religious bodies and religious persons, monasteries, bishops, parsons, hold lands for which they do no earthly service to the lord. They are said to hold by way of Free alms, Per Liberam Elemosynam, In Frankalmoign. The theory of tenure is saved by the doctrine, that they owe spiritual service, that they are bound to pray for the soul of the donor who has given them this land.”

A gift, for example, to Ramsey Abbey would take the form of a gift “to God and St Benet of Ramsey and the Abbot Walter and the monks of St Benet,” or “to God and the church of St Benet of Ramsey and the Abbot and his monks,” or simply “to God and the church of St Benet of Ramsey,” or yet more briefly “to God and St Benet". The fact that the land was given to God was made manifest by appropriate ceremonies; often the donor laid the charter of feoffment, or some knife or other symbol of possession upon the altar of the church.

Mark.

 
Mengo09
210124.  Sat Sep 15, 2007 10:46 pm Reply with quote

facetious- only word to have vowels in the right order

 
samivel
210126.  Sun Sep 16, 2007 12:57 am Reply with quote

Abstemious does as well.

 
petipetra
210165.  Sun Sep 16, 2007 7:01 am Reply with quote

well, the only f-word with the vowels in the right order, then ;) does not sound as QI, though.

 
96aelw
210313.  Sun Sep 16, 2007 4:11 pm Reply with quote

Arsenoius does as well, although I think that ma be the lot, which, if so, leaves the f-word point unaffected, I suppose.

 
CaptTimmy
210319.  Sun Sep 16, 2007 4:32 pm Reply with quote

96aelw wrote:
Arsenoius does as well, although I think that ma be the lot, which, if so, leaves the f-word point unaffected, I suppose.


[pedant]

You do mean Arsenious, don't you?

[/pedant]

:-D

 
96aelw
210328.  Sun Sep 16, 2007 4:52 pm Reply with quote

Ah, so you spotted the deliberate mistake (he typed, unconvincingly). I also may have meant "may" rather than "ma", if it comes to that.

Either that or it wasn't a mistake at all, but an attempt to re-order English vowels in a subtle linguistic coup d'etat. I haven't decided which, yet.

 
mckeonj
210332.  Sun Sep 16, 2007 5:14 pm Reply with quote

Phascinating 'F' Vorts...
...summarizes fat it was I was going t'say.

 
Mengo09
210622.  Mon Sep 17, 2007 9:44 pm Reply with quote

petipetra wrote:
well, the only f-word with the vowels in the right order, then ;) does not sound as QI, though.

Well, yeah

 
jaygeemack
210742.  Tue Sep 18, 2007 7:48 am Reply with quote

petipetra wrote:
well, the only f-word with the vowels in the right order, then ;) does not sound as QI, though.

It is also the only word in the English language with this particular collection of letters in this particular order.

 
Tas
210743.  Tue Sep 18, 2007 7:51 am Reply with quote

Quote:
petipetra wrote:
well, the only f-word with the vowels in the right order, then ;) does not sound as QI, though.

It is also the only word in the English language with this particular collection of letters in this particular order.


Aside from facetiousness. Of course, I may have made that word up...

:-)

Tas

 
dr.bob
210765.  Tue Sep 18, 2007 8:44 am Reply with quote

And facetiously :)

 
markvent
210833.  Tue Sep 18, 2007 10:21 am Reply with quote

Facetić in booksellers' catalogues was a euphemism for erotica.
I suppose meaning "jokes or novelties".

Whilst on the subject of F words .. I'd like to bring up the word FLUKE.

the first use of the word I can find seems to have come from Old Norse "Floke" meaning a flatfish, in itself possible from Old German "Floch" meaning flat. More laterly FLUKE seems to be used to refer specifically to the Summer Flounder.

It is also the name given ot the flat blade of an anchor, which I presume comes from its resembalance to the above and the fact that it buries itself in the sand of the seabed emulating a trait of flatfish, although this link is unproven. The term is then applied to the tail of a whale, again most obviously due to a resemblance to both or either of the above.

The term then surfaces again in the 1800's as a slang term for a gullible person what we might refer to today as a "Mug". Now either before (or after) that, its really quite muddied, a gullible person was referred to as being "flat".

Fluke then suddenly and for no documented reason, assumes the meaning of a lucky shot in Billiards in the mid-19thC.

if I were to suggest a hypothesis I would suggest it would be related to some kind of hustling at billiards. Where the hustler would play badly, increasing the wager as they play, and then , at the crucial moment, winning by a fluke-shot at the end.

I love creating my own clunky etymologies ... feel free to comment :)

Mark.

 
Frances
212607.  Sun Sep 23, 2007 6:18 am Reply with quote

Flook was a cartoon strip by "Trog" in the Daily Mail newspaper, which ran from 1949 to 1984.

 
mckeonj
212691.  Sun Sep 23, 2007 9:28 am Reply with quote

'Trog' was the pen name of the team Wally Fawkes and George Melly. The neighbouring strip, from the same stable I think, was '4D Jones, the Space Cowboy'.
Well, 4 begins with F, dunnit?

 

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