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Flash Lingo

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gerontius grumpus
203999.  Sun Aug 26, 2007 8:10 am Reply with quote

I've never understood the meaning of the cockney "monkey, pony" etc, or even the sums of money they refer to.
I wrongly presumed that a monkey must be £1000, Monkey's hand - grand. Oh well, I never liked only fools and Horses all that much.

I too would be interested to know the meaning of the military nicknames Nobby Clark, Pincher Martin etc.

 
samivel
204006.  Sun Aug 26, 2007 8:40 am Reply with quote

Well, I always thought 'pincher' was just a general nickname for a sailor, and that Martin was the surname of the central character in Golding's Pincher Martin.

Regarding Nobby Clark(e), Wiki has a couple of possible explanations.

 
markvent
206302.  Mon Sep 03, 2007 11:27 am Reply with quote

Jessamy - a fop

Jasmine was originally known as Jessamy, and it was added to soaps and used to scent clothes, and those smelling of such were considered to be very soft, gentle, naive, etc.

It was used as far as I can tell much as "you big girls blouse", "fairy" etc are in more modern times.

I have no proof but could this be the source of "Jessy" as in "You Big Jessy" ?

Mark.

 
Mr Grue
241183.  Fri Dec 07, 2007 9:38 am Reply with quote

markvent wrote:
Well how about this for a shudder ... in the 2007 adaption of St Trinian's Flash Harry will be played by Russell Brand.

noooooooooooooo don't let them do it !!


Actually, judging by the trailer, he's not too bad.

And Stephen Fry puts in an appearance too.

 
Mr Grue
242390.  Mon Dec 10, 2007 7:33 am Reply with quote

markvent wrote:
"He takes a card and shades one-half of it in dark, so he can demonstrate to you just what he means. He says, 'There's wrong and there's right, there's black and there's white, and there is nothing, nothing in-between.' That's what Mr. A says."


Prize for the obscure signature, btw!

 
markvent
249748.  Fri Dec 28, 2007 7:25 am Reply with quote

markvent wrote:
I've been reading up on my Flash Lingo...

Flash - expensive, showy
Flash Gent - showing off his wealth, and by inference is a criminal.
Flash Lingo - Cant (criminal slang)

Quote:
Rum Bubbers - "a dexterous fellow at stealing silver tankards from inns and taverns."
Quote:
Groaners - "fellows who go around with street preachers, who, while the mock parson is preaching, they pick the pockets of the listeners"
Quote:
Duffers - "cheats who ply in different parts of London and pretend to deal in smuggled goods and sell goods at double their price."
Quote:
Lully Priggers - "thieves who decoy children to some secluded place and rob them of their clothes or steal clothes hung out to dry."
Quote:
Starrers - "theives who smash shop windows and steal items from within."
Quote:
Mounters - "a hawker of quack medicines who attracts customers with stories, jokes, or tricks"
Quote:
Cloak Twitchers - "rogues who lurk about the entrances into dark alleys, and bye-lanes, to snatch cloaks from the shoulders of passers-by"
Quote:
Money Droppers - "cheats who drop money, which they pretend to find just before some country lad; and by way of giving him a share of their good luck, entice him into a public house, where they and their confederates cheat or rob him of what money he has about him"
Quote:
Rushers - "thieves who knock at the doors of great houses in London, in summer time, when the families are gone out of town, and on the door being opened by a woman, rush in and rob the house"
Quote:
Fawney Coves - "a fellow who drops a brass ring, double gilt, which he picks up before the party meant to be cheated, and to whom he disposes of it for less than its supposed, and ten times more than its real, value"
Quote:
Adam Iglers - "a pickpocket’s associate, who receives the stolen goods, and runs off with them."
Quote:
Buffers - "one that steals and kills horses and dogs for their skins"
Quote:
Dragsmen - "one who cuts the luggage straps on carriages (drags) and steals the trunks"


Mark.


Lovely to see this in the QI Annual :)

Mark.

 
translateltd
1345806.  Sun Apr 12, 2020 1:31 am Reply with quote

[quote="markvent"]
dr.bob wrote:
Of course, there's the possibility that it wasn't a note, but a coin. Coins generally have some kind of design on them, right? Given that the first Indian rupees were believed to have been produced in the 15th or 16th century, and British involvement with trade to India began in the 16th century, I think it'll be hard to disprove this link entirely. I certainly can't find any historical archive of rupee designs going back that far.

No admittedly I dont have anything on that but I'll check with Numismatist friends :)




Curious to know if the numismatist friends were ever consulted on this :-) I'm not aware of there ever having been a 25-rupee note under the Raj, and coins didn't run beyond 15 rupees at the time, so the Indian theory sounds little more than urban myth. It also doesn't explain how a term supposedly derived from 25 rupees could find itself applied to £25, a much larger sum.

 
bobwilson
1345984.  Mon Apr 13, 2020 4:27 pm Reply with quote

Why do people call roll-ups "Bellamy's"?

 
bobwilson
1345987.  Mon Apr 13, 2020 4:31 pm Reply with quote

Also

Quote:
Clerks in the City of London used to wear Nobby hats, a type of bowler hat. Alternative spellings include "Knobby" and "Clarke".
(from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nobby)

How on Earth could you misspell Nobby as Clarke?

 
PDR
1345991.  Mon Apr 13, 2020 5:14 pm Reply with quote

bobwilson wrote:
How on Earth could you misspell Nobby as Clarke?


I blame the schools.

PDR

 
bobwilson
1345992.  Mon Apr 13, 2020 5:15 pm Reply with quote

don't you mean the squids?

 
PDR
1345993.  Mon Apr 13, 2020 5:27 pm Reply with quote

No, I found that just needed a quick course of imodium plus.

PDR

 
suze
1345997.  Mon Apr 13, 2020 5:46 pm Reply with quote

bobwilson wrote:
How on Earth could you misspell Nobby as Clarke?


You may very well ask!

There are a dozen supposed explanations for why it is that people called Clark(e) are often known as Nobby. There's no real evidence for any of them, and the matter has to be considered unexplained.

On your other question, I have to say that I've not heard roll ups called "Bellamys", and neither have any of the sources at my immediate disposal. Is it a regional term?

 
bobwilson
1345999.  Mon Apr 13, 2020 6:41 pm Reply with quote

Might be prison slang - I've been recently mixing with the "less successful in their chosen career path" types

 
Alfred E Neuman
1346003.  Tue Apr 14, 2020 2:41 am Reply with quote

bobwilson wrote:
Might be prison slang - I've been recently mixing with the "less successful in their chosen career path" types

Is your internet access a reward for good behaviour?

 

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