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Four Leaf Clover

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smiley_face
189199.  Sun Jul 08, 2007 4:19 pm Reply with quote

The four leaf clover, said to bring about good luck, is very rare, and occurs (it is thought) because of a genetic mutation in a three-leaf-clover plant.

The four leaves each represent one of Hope, Faith, Love and Luck, with the legend dating back to Biblical times - according to legend, Eve carried a four leaf clover from the Garden of Eden.

They were also regarded as lucky by the Druids: In 1620, Sir John Melton wrote: "If a man walking in the fields find any four-leaved grass, he shall in a small while after find some good thing." The Druids believed that a four leaf clover would help them to see evil spirits, allowing them to escape from them. The bearer of the clover was also able to see fairies, and this became a popular game with children during the Middle Ages - upon finding a four leaf clover in a field, they would then try and find fairies. A four leaf clover was also believed by the Druids to ward off bad luck as it contained a magical repellent.

White clovers were seen as a charm against evil spirits by early Celts in Wales. In addition to this, a normal three leaf clover is something associated with the Holy Trinity by Christians.

S: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Four-leaf_clover
S: http://www.fourleafclover.com/4fact.html
S: http://www.wyrdology.com/luck/4leaf-clover.html
S: http://www.weatherwars.info/chemtrails_2.htm

Sorry if that was a bit on the dull side, just 4 leaf clovers seem to be a little less interesting than I had anticipated. I suppose it is to be expected - they are plants, after all.

 
mckeonj
189231.  Mon Jul 09, 2007 3:19 am Reply with quote

Five leaf clover also begins with F, and here is a picture of one:

They are, of course, extremely rare, and are considered to be unlucky.

 
smiley_face
189246.  Mon Jul 09, 2007 3:41 am Reply with quote

There has also been an eighteen leaf clover, the record holder for the most number of leaves on a clover:



S: Guinness World Records

 
mckeonj
189278.  Mon Jul 09, 2007 4:28 am Reply with quote

This list is extracted from the Manx Gaelic dictionary; and serves to introduce the beloved shamrock into the discussion:
Quote:
shamrag - shamrock, trefoil, clover
shamrag gharroo - Rough clover
shamrag ny gabbil - Red clover
shamrag rangagh - alsike
shamrag vane - Dutch clover
shamrag Vanninagh - wood sorrel
shamrag vog - soft clover
shamrag Voirrey - four-leaved shamrock, wood pimpernel, four-leaved clover
shamrag wuigh - hop trefoil


'It all depends on what you mean by clover' - Professor Branestaum
some more dictionary definitions:
Quote:
white clover: creeping European clover having white to pink flowers and bright green leaves; naturalized in United States; widely grown for forage
common wood sorrel: Eurasian plant with heart-shaped trifoliate leaves and white purple-veined flowers
hop clover: clover native to Ireland with yellowish flowers; often considered the true or original shamrock

Quote:
The shamrock, a symbol of Ireland, is a three-leaved young white clover, sometimes (rarely nowadays) Trifolium repens (white clover, known in Irish as seamair bhán) but more usually today Trifolium dubium (lesser clover, Irish: seamair bhuí). The shamrock was traditionally used for its medical properties and was a popular motif in Victorian times.

 
Frances
191938.  Tue Jul 17, 2007 7:24 am Reply with quote

You can buy four-leaf-clover plants. I had one, but forgot to take a bit with me when we flitted. Unlucky, eh?

 
four leaf clover
680933.  Tue Mar 09, 2010 9:38 pm Reply with quote

What do the leaves on 4-leaf-clover symbolize?:

One leaf is for HOPE... The second for FAITH...

The third for LOVE... And the fourth for LUCK!

By definition,
for a clover to represent the Trinity, it would have to bear 3 leaves. Four-leaf-clovers have 4 leaves and therefore can't be considered shamrocks.

<commercial links deleted by Jenny>

 
bemahan
680958.  Wed Mar 10, 2010 3:21 am Reply with quote

We found a lots of four leaved clovers on the top of a cliff in Devon a few years ago. We were sitting down having a rest and the kids started looking. Found one and we were all very excited, then found about 3 more. Genuine clovers.

 
RLDavies
681745.  Thu Mar 11, 2010 2:09 pm Reply with quote

I used to have something of a talent for spotting four-leaved clovers. Just walking along, and one would just leap out at me. That hasn't happened for a very long time now. Then again, there aren't many clovers where I live now.

Clover plants produce cyanide to deter herbivores, but the amount of cyanide varies from individual to individual, even within the same population. If I remember (and please somebody correct me if I'm wrong), the white horseshoe marking on the leaves is a rough guide to the concentration -- the brighter the marking, the more poisonous the plant.

 
samivel
681750.  Thu Mar 11, 2010 2:24 pm Reply with quote

RLDavies wrote:
I used to have something of a talent for spotting four-leaved clovers. Just walking along, and one would just leap out at me.


I think I'd be pretty good at spotting four-leafed clovers too if they leapt out at me.

;)

 
RLDavies
681760.  Thu Mar 11, 2010 2:49 pm Reply with quote

samivel wrote:
RLDavies wrote:
I used to have something of a talent for spotting four-leaved clovers. Just walking along, and one would just leap out at me.


I think I'd be pretty good at spotting four-leafed clovers too if they leapt out at me.

;)

RAAARRRR! Clover attack! Duck and cover!

 
tchrist
681763.  Thu Mar 11, 2010 2:59 pm Reply with quote

RLDavies wrote:
Clover plants produce cyanide to deter herbivores, but the amount of cyanide varies from individual to individual, even within the same population. If I remember (and please somebody correct me if I'm wrong), the white horseshoe marking on the leaves is a rough guide to the concentration -- the brighter the marking, the more poisonous the plant.

That's good to know: it's prudent to know what one is (or shouldn't be) eating.

I say this because one of the tastier clover-like plants is lemon clover, Oxalis stricta. It grows everywhere in North America, and many places in Eurasia, too; apparently not so common in Britain though.

That genus doesn't contain true clovers, but rather the wood-sorrels. It looks like a shamrock though, and is quite tasty with its lemony bite. When making a nice salad, I'll often garnish it with gay lemon clover flowers and bright young leaves.

--tom

 
samivel
681898.  Thu Mar 11, 2010 8:24 pm Reply with quote

tchrist wrote:
When making a nice salad, I'll often garnish it with gay lemon clover flowers and bright young leaves.


Isn't that just positive discrimination?

;)

 

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