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Extinction by a majority

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Mr Grue
256885.  Sat Jan 12, 2008 6:42 am Reply with quote

djgordy wrote:
Curious Danny wrote:

Either way, it is a large bovine animal eaten by Plain Indians....


...and sometimes by attractive Indians too,


Ah, I was going to go with coloured Indians. Red in this instance.

 
Mr Grue
256889.  Sat Jan 12, 2008 6:58 am Reply with quote

Oh, and the dodo thing is disputed, which I think came up in the D series. Dodo apparently tasted awful. The idea is that the sailors brought with them all sorts of animals that raided the dodos' nests, and that coupled with deforestation led to the animal dying out. There remains little evidence of dodo-hunting on the sort of scale necessary to wipe out the species.

What I find more interesting is the notion that for years it was widely believed that the dodo never genuinely existed. It looked too absurd and there wasn't (and to this day isn't) a complete specimen of one. We had part of a dodo, but we burnt it, 'cos it stank.

Archaeologists discovered a nearly complete skeleton in 2005.

 
General_Woundwort
256890.  Sat Jan 12, 2008 7:04 am Reply with quote

The first specimums of the 'duck-billed' platypus were thought to be frauds as well.

 
Mr Grue
256893.  Sat Jan 12, 2008 7:12 am Reply with quote

Which reminds me of an F. Fiji mermaid! Or has that been done already?

 
Arcane
258059.  Mon Jan 14, 2008 3:26 am Reply with quote



now THAT'S a cane toad!

my brother sent me this photo a few months ago, but i lost it. thought i'd share it with you... terrifying!

although i have to say, we don't get them around that size here, but we definitely don't get anywhere near the amount we used to.

i'm going to get my book of lists as i have some more extictions to post.

 
General_Woundwort
258232.  Mon Jan 14, 2008 8:23 am Reply with quote

The ghoulish irony about cane toads is that they were introduced to control beetles which rest atop stalks. For reasons demonstrated above they are rather rubbish.

 
Southpaw
258236.  Mon Jan 14, 2008 8:33 am Reply with quote

I don't think anyone has mentioned the deliberate introduction of mixamatosis in Australia's rabbit population, which was pretty effective I believe. Though last I heard the rabbits that survived had a natural resistance to the disease which has now of course been bred in to the population; evolution through natural selection is a bugger.

 
General_Woundwort
258336.  Mon Jan 14, 2008 10:16 am Reply with quote

Australia has a bit of a fondness for introducing "population control" diseases or predators, and then saying "whoops". Currently wet fever (?) in threatening the Tasmanian devils, and I have read similar suggestions.

 
Flash
258348.  Mon Jan 14, 2008 10:26 am Reply with quote

Dodo updates: apparently a large cache of dodo bones was found in Mauritius in December 2005 so we aren't quite as short of physical evidence as we once were. Until then we had fewer bones from the dodo than we do from some dinosaurs.

They didn't die out in the C19th, though: they were probably extinct by 1700.

 
Captain Caveman
258350.  Mon Jan 14, 2008 10:26 am Reply with quote

Of course a highly successful extinction war was waged and won against smallpox, the only surviving samples are in labs unless I'm mistaken?

 
Captain Caveman
258351.  Mon Jan 14, 2008 10:29 am Reply with quote

Beavers in the uk were also hunted to extinction for their pelts and musk glands. Think they were extinct by the 14th century but would need to look that one up.

 
Southpaw
258355.  Mon Jan 14, 2008 10:35 am Reply with quote

Wolves used to be pretty common in the UK too, no?

 
Tas
258410.  Mon Jan 14, 2008 11:52 am Reply with quote

I am not sure the extinction of wolves and bears {in the UK) was a deliberate culling by the residents. More a proctection of what was there's, and the gradual loss of habitat, I would imagine.

:-)

Tas

 
Ameena
258555.  Mon Jan 14, 2008 3:32 pm Reply with quote

Boars too, then ;).
I've heard somewhere that they want to release some wolves in Scotland, though I can't remember the exact details as to when this was or whether it's actually gonna go ahead or not.

 
General_Woundwort
258680.  Mon Jan 14, 2008 5:37 pm Reply with quote

As William Cobbett would say, if wolves are good for the eco-system, why not release them into Kent?

 

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