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Coded Palindromes

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Gray
17655.  Fri Apr 15, 2005 10:00 am Reply with quote

Switch A and B on, walk around the corner, and it the light isn't on, you *know* it's switch C. If the light is on, you can't know without doing another 40m journey (back to the switches and back to the room).

That's the only way I can think of that you *can* know for sure (but not necessarily every time - you need a little luck!) Nice trick. :-)

 
Gaazy
17658.  Fri Apr 15, 2005 10:01 am Reply with quote

Oh, I've just re-read the question - originally I thought you were only allowed to look into the room, not go into it. That changes things radically.

 
eggshaped
17659.  Fri Apr 15, 2005 10:02 am Reply with quote

Ok, my answer is below, needless to say, if you want to work it out yourself, look away now:





The answer is that you press switch A, wait for a few minutes, turn A off, then press B and walk into the other room.

If the light is on, the answer is B if not feel the bulb. If the bulb is warm the answer is A, if not the answer is C.

 
Gaazy
17661.  Fri Apr 15, 2005 10:04 am Reply with quote

Yes, I can see now that of course it's 20m, if you're allowed to touch the bulb. (This message sent before you posted the answer - honest!)

 
Gray
17662.  Fri Apr 15, 2005 10:05 am Reply with quote

Oh nice. :-)

 
eggshaped
17663.  Fri Apr 15, 2005 10:10 am Reply with quote

I only saw your post 17658, after I'd posted the answer Gaazy, or I would have hung-fire.

You clearly worked it out before I gave the answer. Well done.

 
dr.bob
17718.  Mon Apr 18, 2005 4:37 am Reply with quote

Wasn't that a question recently on the rather excellent, if incredibly cheap, BBC4 game show "Mind Games"? (sadly not being broadcast just now)

My favourite puzzle from that show was the story about the King who died and left his collection of horses to his three sons. His will decreed that his stables should be divided up in the following manner:

His eldest son should receive half of the horses
His middle son should receive a quarter of the horses
His youngest son should receive one sixth of the horses

Since the King's stables contained 11 horses, the three sons were rather perplexed as to how to divide them up. At this point the local blacksmith, who was out riding his horse past the royal palace, came over to give them a hand and, with his help, they were able to divide up the horses according to the King's will without having to chop any of the horses up.

How many horses did each son receive?

 
Gray
17726.  Mon Apr 18, 2005 5:18 am Reply with quote

Imagine there are 12 horses. Then the sons get 6, 3 and 2 (which makes 11 anyway). Everyone's happy.

I expect the cunning blacksmith might lend his horse to them for the duration of the calculation...

 
dr.bob
17727.  Mon Apr 18, 2005 5:22 am Reply with quote

Bingo! (quick too)

The presence of the blacksmith's horse to bring the total up to 12 makes the sums possible. At the end of the dividing, of course, you end up with one horse left over, i.e. the Blacksmith's horse, which he can ride away again :)

 
Lord_Wilson
17745.  Mon Apr 18, 2005 8:02 am Reply with quote

Once more returning to the subject of palendromes for a moment, most of you may not know this, but there is a song that exists entirely of these little word phrases (if you ignore some of the punctuation...)

If, anyone is interested, it's called (inventively enough) Bob, and it's by Wierd Al Yankovic, I've got a snippet here...

"Rise to vote, sir,
Do geese see God?
'Do nine men interpret?' 'Nine men,' I nod,
Rats live on no evil star,
Won't lovers revolt now?
Race fast, safe car,
Pa's a sap,
Ma is as selfless as I am
May a moody baby doom a yam?"

If you DO fancy a listen, Amazon have a preview here...

http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/B000095J7Q/ref=pd_sxp_elt_l1/026-7330526-7498815

 
eggshaped
17894.  Tue Apr 19, 2005 5:38 am Reply with quote

Overlooked so far on this thread is the word tattarrattat. According to the OED it has only been used once by James Joyce in Ulysses.

This from the Guinness Book of Records site:
http://www.guinnessworldrecords.com/

Quote:
The longest palindrome in the Oxford English Dictionary is the 12-letter tattarrattat, a nonce word (invented for a particular event or occasion) meaning rat-a-tat. The Irish author James Joyce used the word in Ulysses (1922): "I knew his tattarrattat at the door."

 
Gaazy
17895.  Tue Apr 19, 2005 5:46 am Reply with quote

Of course, this means that anyone can break the record by inventing a nonce-word. So I claim victory by including the word aporotafoggirogomeskaksemogoriggofatoropa (meaning a piece of sellotape stuck to a carpet) in the following sentence:

Even my Dyson couldn't cope with the aporotafoggirogomeskaksemogoriggofatoropa which was disfiguring my bedroom carpet.

I don't expect to hold on to the record for long, though.

 
eggshaped
17896.  Tue Apr 19, 2005 5:55 am Reply with quote

Quote:
"I knew his tattarrattat at the door."


If Joyce took too long answering the door, surely it would become a tattarattarattat, or even a tattarattattattarattat.

Ho hum, back to work.

 
Old Bailey
17897.  Tue Apr 19, 2005 8:39 am Reply with quote

Ah Gaazy, your claim is false!

Your palindrome isnt quite accurate you see. There should be 2 a's
in the middle of: aporotafoggirogomeskaksemogoriggofatoropa
and there appears only one.

So I claim the prize with:
aporotafoggirogomeskaaksemogoriggofatoropa

...and go back to doing what I should be doing

 
Morkris
17907.  Tue Apr 19, 2005 2:29 pm Reply with quote

Didn't we all just use it and therfore negate the record ? or is it only famous people that count in this sort of thing
eggshaped wrote:
Overlooked so far on this thread is the word tattarrattat. According to the OED it has only been used once by James Joyce in Ulysses.

This from the Guinness Book of Records site:
http://www.guinnessworldrecords.com/

Quote:
The longest palindrome in the Oxford English Dictionary is the 12-letter tattarrattat, a nonce word (invented for a particular event or occasion) meaning rat-a-tat. The Irish author James Joyce used the word in Ulysses (1922): "I knew his tattarrattat at the door."

 

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