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Tricknero
178487.  Mon May 28, 2007 10:38 am Reply with quote

I have two from the kitchen...

1. Adding salt to water makes it boil slower.

Technically this is true, but as the total boiling time is only incresed by a fraction of a second - it seems a particularly unhelpful rule.

2. Gnocchi (and indeed other kinds of pasta) are perfectly cooked when they begin to rise in boiling water - salted or otherwise.

Actually it is the bubbles underneath the gnocchi which make them rise - so it's about shape, not density. This is why cauliflower rises so quickly, its bumby shape catches many bubbles on the underside and so it's pushed upwards.

Any other culinary mis-conceptions out there...?

 
AsylumUtopia
178490.  Mon May 28, 2007 10:57 am Reply with quote

Tricknero wrote:
Any other culinary mis-conceptions out there...?

That Gnocchi are pasta? Until I looked it up a minute ago, I thought that they are always made from potato, so therefore they wouldn't qualify as pasta, but apparently they can also be made with semolina, flour, or ricotta cheese.

According to Wiki http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gnocchi

"Gnocchi are often listed among pasta dishes, although gnocchi have different ingredients and mode of preparation."

But it then goes on to say "They cook faster than normal pasta and can fall apart if overcooked.".

So are they pasta or not ?

 
mckeonj
178492.  Mon May 28, 2007 11:17 am Reply with quote

My Granny Shanks always said one should put a pinch of salt into sweet dishes and a pinch of sugar into savouries.
If you doubt the wisdom of this, remember that she also said that hot water freezes more quickly than cold, when put outside in freezing weather; i.e. for the birds.

 
Tricknero
178501.  Mon May 28, 2007 12:46 pm Reply with quote

Is gnocchi pasta or not...?

It's a bit like the banana debate... technically they're herbs - but for ease of conversation I will always group them with the fruit.

They're normally served during the pasta course of a meal (gnocchi that is, not bananas) so I would tend to call them a pasta regardless... but you're right, technically the composition makes it all a bit contentious.

 
Flash
178580.  Mon May 28, 2007 6:10 pm Reply with quote

Tricknero wrote:
It's a bit like the banana debate... technically they're herbs


That's not quite right, is it? I think it's the case that technically (ie botanically) speaking the banana is a berry, which is to say a kind of fruit, which grows on a plant that's a herb (not a tree).

 
MinervaMoon
178588.  Mon May 28, 2007 8:39 pm Reply with quote

Flash wrote:
Tricknero wrote:
It's a bit like the banana debate... technically they're herbs


That's not quite right, is it? I think it's the case that technically (ie botanically) speaking the banana is a berry, which is to say a kind of fruit, which grows on a plant that's a herb (not a tree).


From Family and Consumer Sciences of Oklahoma:

Is a banana a berry and does it grow on a bush?

Yes, the banana fruit is a berry. Berries are identified as being many seeded with a fleshy inner layer. So, technically a banana is a berry. And, believe it or not, bananas don't grow on trees! Originally from Asia, the "banana tree" is really not a tree in the true sense. In fact, banana plants have no wood fiber. The banana plant is the world's largest herb and a member of the lily family. Bananas grow in tropical areas all around the world where the weather is sunny and hot, and there's plenty of rain.

 
dr.bob
178592.  Tue May 29, 2007 3:24 am Reply with quote

Tricknero wrote:
Is gnocchi pasta or not...?


No, it's not.

Tricknero wrote:
They're normally served during the pasta course of a meal (gnocchi that is, not bananas) so I would tend to call them a pasta regardless...


Gnocchi are served as the first course (primo piatto) in an Italian meal, much like pasta. But the first course may also consist of soup or salad, and I doubt you'd refer to them as pasta.

Gnocchi do seem to exist in a little food group of their own, but they're definitely distinct from pasta.

 
eggshaped
178643.  Tue May 29, 2007 6:20 am Reply with quote

In Italy it was customary to only eat gnocchi on a thursday. These days it doesn't really apply; though some restaurants still only serve it on thursdays.

 
Tas
178657.  Tue May 29, 2007 6:38 am Reply with quote

I do add a splash of olive oil and salt when cooking pasta. It makes a noticeable difference to the flavour...

:-)

Tas

 
AlmondFacialBar
178674.  Tue May 29, 2007 6:49 am Reply with quote

dr.bob wrote:
Tricknero wrote:
Is gnocchi pasta or not...?


No, it's not.

Tricknero wrote:
They're normally served during the pasta course of a meal (gnocchi that is, not bananas) so I would tend to call them a pasta regardless...


Gnocchi are served as the first course (primo piatto) in an Italian meal, much like pasta. But the first course may also consist of soup or salad, and I doubt you'd refer to them as pasta.

Gnocchi do seem to exist in a little food group of their own, but they're definitely distinct from pasta.


i've had gnocchi as secondi piatti more than once, in fairly out of the way places. maybe it's different from region to region/ my experience is exclusively tuscan...

mmmm... now i want gnocchi in tomato and basil sauce. the word "gnocchi" is a great sobriety tester, btw (unless you're italian i guess). as long as you can still pronounce it correctly you're probably still sober enough to drive... ;-)

:-)

AlmondFacialBar

 
Celebaelin
178682.  Tue May 29, 2007 6:58 am Reply with quote

AlmondFacialBar wrote:
the word "gnocchi" is a great sobriety tester, btw (unless you're italian i guess). as long as you can still pronounce it correctly you're probably still sober enough to drive...

Good tip.

I shall, when next stopped by the police whilst driving under the influence of a surfeit of alcohol, lean out of my window as they approach and scream "Gnocchi" at them three times in succession. Having thus proved my sobriety I shall simply drive off at top speed.

 
AlmondFacialBar
178693.  Tue May 29, 2007 7:18 am Reply with quote

i don't think that would be quite the way to approach it to be quite honest... *scratches head*

:-)

AlmondFacialBar

 
smiley_face
178714.  Tue May 29, 2007 7:33 am Reply with quote

If you're northern, you could just say "no key", and you'd probably get away with it.

 
suze
178724.  Tue May 29, 2007 7:50 am Reply with quote

Tsk, smiley. /'ɲɔki/, please. For those who either can't see the IPA or don't understand it, the first sound should be the one denoted ņ in words such as "Espaņa".

 
AlmondFacialBar
178728.  Tue May 29, 2007 7:53 am Reply with quote

yup! took me about a week and three patient waiters to get my tongue around it. ;-)

:-)

AlmondFacialBar

 

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