View previous topic | View next topic

Flags

Page 2 of 5
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5  Next

96aelw
177466.  Thu May 24, 2007 6:39 am Reply with quote

Of course. Gosh, I feel foolish. In my defence, it had never occurred to me that one might pronounce it with a soft 'g', but it bloody should have done. Let this be a salutary lesson to all whose resolute insistence on hardness keeps them from spotting a blatantly obvious vergina when it's waved under their nose.

Away from smut, I think it's pretty definitely a place of significance for Philip of Macedon; the controversy is over which Philip of Macedon.

 
suze
177475.  Thu May 24, 2007 6:57 am Reply with quote

Meh, just me being smutty again.

In no Greek pronunciation would that particular g actually be pronounced /dʒ/ (i.e. as English j). It would be /g/ in Erasmian pronunciation (i.e. that conventionally used when studying Classics), while it would be /j/ (i.e. English y) in modern Greek.

The Greek form of the place name is Βεργίνα. To have it starting with a /v/ therefore, it has to be modern Greek, so the /j/ seems appropriate.

Then again of course, the g in vagina would have been hard in Latin .


Anyways, the answer to the question I posed is the Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia. The Greeks objected to the use of the sixteen pointed Vergina Sun, so it was replaced with the eight pointed Kratovo Sun.

 
Celebaelin
177477.  Thu May 24, 2007 7:01 am Reply with quote

suze wrote:
Then again of course, the g in vagina would have been hard in Latin .

Which explains a lot about Roman military success.

 
Tas
177492.  Thu May 24, 2007 7:55 am Reply with quote

Or at least why they felt the need to invade lands with softer, more yielding va....I think I'll stop there.

:-)

Tas

 
96aelw
177493.  Thu May 24, 2007 8:00 am Reply with quote

Before you put your foot in it?

 
ZJMMJB
278498.  Sat Feb 16, 2008 12:27 pm Reply with quote

Some quite interesting facts about flags...

UK Flag:
The UK is actually the only country without a national flag. The Union Jack acts as the country's national flag, but is actually a flag of the monarch. In 1908, it was decided that "the Union Jack should be regarded as the National flag". In Victorian times, the Royal Standard was just as popular as the Union Flag.
The Union Jack/Union Flag can be called by either name, the Jack does not refer to the positioning on a ship, nor does it denote the size of the flag. Since 1902, the two names are officially interchangeable.
The flag of Shetland uses a Norwegian design (a Scandinavian cross) and Scottish colours, representing the relationship Shetland has with both countries.
Before 1864, the White Ensign (apparently) only included St George's cross when not in home waters.
The Union Jack is called the "Rice Flag" in China, as the design is similar to the Chinese character for rice.

US Flag:
The "Betsy Ross" Flag may never have been flown during the American War of Independence. There was no standard for the arrangement of the stars or how many points they had. If the Betsy Ross flag was used, it was the only US national flag to have the stars in a circle.
When independence was declared in 1776, the rebels still flew the "Grand Union Flag" which had the King's Colours in the canton. Although there were thirteen stripes, some flags (such as that used in Philadelphia) had red and green stripes instead of red and white.

Tuvalu Flag:
When Tuvalu introduced a new flag in December 1995, it was so unpopular that a flagpole was chopped down. The design was changed back in April 1997.

Taliban Flag:
In the 1990s, one flag used by the Taliban was plain white.

South Africa Flag:
After 1910, when SA got independence as a dominion, it had two official flags, one was the Union Jack, the other was the flag that was used until 1994.
The current flag of SA just symbolises SA's flag history, nothing else is symbolised by the colours.

Tonga Flag:
The flag of Tonga used to be the same as that of the Red Cross, but was changed to avoid confusion.

Transnistria Flag:
The breakaway republic of Transnistria, officially part of Moldova, uses the old Soviet-era Moldovan flag.

Egypt Flag:
The reverse of the current Egyptian flag is not a mirror image. The Arabic writing is read the same way no matter which side is shown. This is rare, but not unique.
From 1958 to 1961 Egypt shared the same flag as Syria. That flag is still used by Syria.

Somalia Flag:
The blue background in the Somali flag is the same blue used in the UN flag.

Olympic Rings Flag:
Every national flag in the world has at least one colour used in the Olympic flag.

 
djgordy
278640.  Sat Feb 16, 2008 4:58 pm Reply with quote

The flag of Paraguay has a different design on the obverse to that on the reverse.

 
mikeyfone
278662.  Sat Feb 16, 2008 5:14 pm Reply with quote

ZJMMJB wrote:
Somalia Flag:
The blue background in the Somali flag is the same blue used in the UN flag.


Lets face it, that's because they stole a load from the UN mission there in the early 1990s.

 
epicurian riddler
278666.  Sat Feb 16, 2008 5:17 pm Reply with quote

I'm pretty sure it can't be the only one so any knowledge on additional countries with politically-oriented semiotics in their flags would be welcomed!


The Palestinian flag was originally designed by Sharif Hussein for the Arab revolt against the Ottoman Empire in 1916, being adopted as the flag of the Arab National movement the following year.
Although there are various interpretations of what the flag stands for, semiotics-wise, I'll attempt to break it down.

Some believe the flag to be representative of four seperate Arab dynasties, in the following list I will first note what I have been told by various Palestinian people is the meaning of the flag and in brackets mention the social/historical connotations of each denoter.
The colours in the Palestinian flag represent the following:
Green- the fertility of the land
White - the peace the people lived in before the Israeli occupation (the first flag of Mohammed is said to have been a white flag, today it is associated with monarchist movements)
Red - the ensuing bloodshed since said occupation (Red is often used as a unifying colour, in this instance being used to unify the other colours of the flag into one cohesive unit)
Black - the "pain and misery suffered" by the Palestinian people (A black flag has been symbolic of a flag of war since pre-Islamic times, with even the prophet Mohammed having a black flag of war)

In 1967, the state of Israel banned the Palestinian flag and forbade the production of artwork composed of its four colors. In Israeli public opinion there had been a prolonged debate on whether or not the ban applied to peace movement using the flags of Israel and Palestine combined, such as Gush Shalom. On some occasion activists wearing badges with such symbols were detained by police, but were not prosecuted.

Since the signing of the Oslo Peace Accords in 1993, the ban has been relaxed, but is still occasionally enforced

 
ZJMMJB
278721.  Sat Feb 16, 2008 7:03 pm Reply with quote

djgordy wrote:
The flag of Paraguay has a different design on the obverse to that on the reverse.


Yes, that is a better example.

 
ZJMMJB
278722.  Sat Feb 16, 2008 7:09 pm Reply with quote

mikeyfone wrote:
ZJMMJB wrote:
Somalia Flag:
The blue background in the Somali flag is the same blue used in the UN flag.


Lets face it, that's because they stole a load from the UN mission there in the early 1990s.


I think the official text is more like: in honour of the UN that helped Somalia achieve independence. It was adopted in 1954. I guess that made it easier to use the ones they stole in the 1990s...

 
ZJMMJB
278733.  Sat Feb 16, 2008 7:40 pm Reply with quote

Flag colours:

Indian and Pakistani Flags:
Green = Islam
White = Christian
Orange = Hindu (India only)

Bangladeshi Flag:
Red circle in the centre denotes the blood shed in the war of independence.

Russian Flag:
White = clouds
Blue = sky
Red = people/land
Note that this explanation was adopted to the flag in the 1990s, and did not exist when Russia used the same flag pre-1917. The Russian flag was originally a copy of the Dutch flag, although the order of colours was confused.

US Flag:
White stars on a blue background denote a new constellation in the sky (a new country being born, or something like that)

New Zealand Flag:
Red denotes the Maori people. An earlier design for a flag of NZ (1874) was rejected because of the lack of red.

Niue Flag:
Yellow = sunshine and friendship with NZ

Scottish Flag:
Colours of the first Scottish flags were not fixed; yellow, black, red, green were all used. Not sure when white on blue became the norm.
Blue and White in the flag of Shetland represent Scotland (already mentioned)

Chinese Flag:
Red = communist (as in most communist nations)
The flag of China's communist party is a red flag with a gold hammer & sickle. When the flags were designed, links with the USSR were good and the communist ideology considered the same. It was only later that they split, and the flags were not changed.
The yellow in the old Qhing dynasty flag represented the emperor, as anything yellow did in Qhing dynasty China (1644-1912).

South Korean Flag:
Red = North Korea (communist)
Blue = South Korea (capitalist)
This is a common joke in S.Korea and is not official, but is an easy way to remember which way up the flag goes.

 
Starfish13
278893.  Sun Feb 17, 2008 8:40 am Reply with quote

Although many flags depict weapons (swords, spears, knives etc) only one country's flag depicts a firearm. The flag of Mozambique shows a Kalashnikov AK47 crossed with a hoe, laid over an open book.

 
Efros
278914.  Sun Feb 17, 2008 9:34 am Reply with quote

I always felt that the Romanians missed an opportunity when they finally got rid of communism, the opposition used the Romanian flag with a circle cut out, removing the communist symbology, I think in the name of history they should have kept that hole.

 
gerontius grumpus
279311.  Sun Feb 17, 2008 3:58 pm Reply with quote

suze wrote:
Meh, just me being smutty again.

In no Greek pronunciation would that particular g actually be pronounced /dʒ/ (i.e. as English j). It would be /g/ in Erasmian pronunciation (i.e. that conventionally used when studying Classics), while it would be /j/ (i.e. English y) in modern Greek.

The Greek form of the place name is Βεργίνα. To have it starting with a /v/ therefore, it has to be modern Greek, so the /j/ seems appropriate.

Then again of course, the g in vagina would have been hard in Latin .


Anyways, the answer to the question I posed is the Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia. The Greeks objected to the use of the sixteen pointed Vergina Sun, so it was replaced with the eight pointed Kratovo Sun.




And of course the I would be pronounced differently in Greek or Latin to the way we pronounce it in English in this context.

 

Page 2 of 5
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5  Next

All times are GMT - 5 Hours


Display posts from previous:   

Search Search Forums

Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2002 phpBB Group