View previous topic | View next topic

Fitzcarraldo

Page 1 of 1

Mr Grue
177243.  Wed May 23, 2007 2:42 pm Reply with quote

This 1982 Werner Herzog film told the tale of opera lover Fitzcarraldo who had a dream of bringing the beauty of opera to a remote Peruvian city. He journeys up the Amazon in his own steamer, but cannot access the land he has bought in the jungle. His solution is to employ the natives to help him move the steamer from one river, up over a mountain, and back down into the next river.

Herzog achieved the effect of pulling a 340-ton steamer over a mountain by taking the novel approach of pulling a 340-ton steamer over a mountain. As if that wasn't enough, Herzog cast notoriously difficult Klaus Kinski in the role of Fitzcarraldo. Famously, following one of many rules in which Kinski threatened to leave the film, Herzog informed him that he kept a rifle and two bullets, one for the actor, and one for himself.

The film, when it was completed, won Herzog the Best Director award at Cannes.

And we can't mention Herzog and not mention the bet that he made with Errol Morris that should Morris ever make a film Herzog would eat his shoe. Morris did. Herzog did. They sold tickets.

 
AlmondFacialBar
177245.  Wed May 23, 2007 2:55 pm Reply with quote

according to herzog's book about his relationship with kinski, my best fiend, one of the peruvian extras offered him to murder kinski if he continued to behave the way he did during filming. herzog says he denied the offer because he still needed kinski to finish the flim. it was worth the effort, btw, fitzcarraldo is one amazing movie.

:-)

AlmondFacialBar

 
Mr Grue
177247.  Wed May 23, 2007 2:58 pm Reply with quote

It is. The ending came back to me while working on the entry, and it's quite beautiful. The film is deliberately set up to become bigger than the story that it's telling, which is brilliant in itself. And it's mostly captured in the documentary Burden of Dreams.

 
AlmondFacialBar
177250.  Wed May 23, 2007 3:08 pm Reply with quote

yep on all counts! :-) it's sort of sad that kinski's genuine talent and skill as an actor tends to get buried underneath his off-screen antics a lot of the time - bit like keith moon's drumming actually - because his contribution to german post-war film is immeasurable. i remember the night after he died i had a choice between fitzcarraldo and woyzeck - another herzog/ kinski collaboration based on georg buechner's play of the same name - on the telly and actually went for woyzek because you don't get to see that too often. his performance followed me into my dreams.

:-)

AlmondFacialBar

 
Sergei
177253.  Wed May 23, 2007 3:20 pm Reply with quote

It's strange, I was more impressed by the documentary than the film. Perhaps because while the film was a drama about an art-crazed lunatic dragging a ship over a mountain, the documentary showed you an art-crazed lunatic dragging a ship over a mountain in real life.

One odd thing I remember from the documentary is Mick Jagger playing a young mentally retarded guy. (He had to pull out and and so the part was cut from the film.) A shame; it was the only time I ever saw Jagger act convincingly.


Last edited by Sergei on Wed May 23, 2007 3:27 pm; edited 1 time in total

 
AlmondFacialBar
177254.  Wed May 23, 2007 3:25 pm Reply with quote

actually i thought jagger was quite good in performance...

:-)

AlmondFacialBar

 
Sergei
177256.  Wed May 23, 2007 3:30 pm Reply with quote

Did you see him in Ned Kelly? You could've stirred paint with him.

 
AlmondFacialBar
177257.  Wed May 23, 2007 3:31 pm Reply with quote

*lol* i have to agree on that one...

:-)

AlmondFacialBar

 
djgordy
177334.  Wed May 23, 2007 6:01 pm Reply with quote

When "Fitzcarraldo" came out, there was quite a lot of discontent because of what some people (rightly or wrongly) saw as his exploitation of the local people. I saw the film in London very soon after its release and there was a sizeable group of protesters outside the cinema.

 
Sergei
177350.  Wed May 23, 2007 6:30 pm Reply with quote

By he you mean Herzog, right...?

 
dr.bob
177411.  Thu May 24, 2007 4:18 am Reply with quote

Sergei wrote:
One odd thing I remember from the documentary is Mick Jagger playing a young mentally retarded guy. (He had to pull out and and so the part was cut from the film.) A shame; it was the only time I ever saw Jagger act convincingly.


According to film director Julien Temple, whilst in the jungle in Peru filming Fitzcarraldo, Jagger tried an interesting "amazonian marriage ritual" to enlarge his penis.

Quote:
Julien, 53, told Radio 4’s ‘Film Programme’: “It involved putting bamboo over the male member and filling it with stinger bees so the member attained the size of the bamboo.


Julien added:

Quote:
Mick spent months in the jungle in Peru. He was going mad out there I think.


Yeah, that'd explain it.

s:http://www.eontarionow.com/entertainment/2007/05/22/the-mick-jagger-bee-sting-incident/

 
djgordy
177442.  Thu May 24, 2007 6:00 am Reply with quote

Sergei wrote:
By he you mean Herzog, right...?


Yes, sorry. It was thought that Herzog exploited the local people

 
Mr Grue
177489.  Thu May 24, 2007 7:51 am Reply with quote

dr.bob wrote:
According to film director Julien Temple, whilst in the jungle in Peru filming Fitzcarraldo, Jagger tried an interesting "amazonian marriage ritual" to enlarge his penis.


By no small coincidence, this was one of the "Stuff and Nonsense" facts on Radio 2's Maconie and Radcliffe show the other night.

 

Page 1 of 1

All times are GMT - 5 Hours


Display posts from previous:   

Search Search Forums

Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2002 phpBB Group