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Finland

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AlmondFacialBar
195148.  Thu Jul 26, 2007 9:52 am Reply with quote

indeed... and a lot of the scientists' families referred to their dads as paperclips for months because they didn't speak english and only knew that the word "paperclip" obviously had something to do with what they were doing.

:-)

AlmondFacialBar

 
suze
195182.  Thu Jul 26, 2007 11:19 am Reply with quote

dr.bob wrote:
Gunboats? I thought it was the Coast Guard who were fighting on the Icelandic side?


It was indeed the Landhelgisgæsla Íslands, which is usually translated as "Icelandic Coast Guard". But Iceland has no armed forces apart from the coast guard and a small paramilitary unit within the police service, and its coast guard vessels are fitted with guns.

 
dr.bob
195262.  Fri Jul 27, 2007 3:19 am Reply with quote

So if you fall out of a boat and start drowning near Iceland, you're likely to be faced with the sight of a gunboat bearing down on you?

Superb! :)

 
markvent
195599.  Fri Jul 27, 2007 5:01 pm Reply with quote

Whereas if you wake up late in Finland on July 27th .. you'll wake up VERY cold and wet ....

July the 27th is Sleepyhead Day in Finland, when the laziest person in the house is thrown into a lake or into the sea.

Mark.

 
markvent
195609.  Fri Jul 27, 2007 6:04 pm Reply with quote

Finland has never been an enduring independent sovereign monarchy in the traditional sense of a nation-state ruled by its own monarch.

The attempt to create a Kingdom of Finland in 1742 is a little known chapter in the history of Finland. When the Russian counter-offensive in Russo-Swedish War (1741–1743) started in March 1742, Empress Elizabeth of Russia presented Finns – then still a part of the Kingdom of Sweden – with a declaration where she promised to make Finland independent unless they resisted her troops. By July 1742, Russia had occupied all of Finland, meeting almost no resistance. General James Keith, a Scottish mercenary responsible for the occupying Russian forces in the south, called for the estates of south western Finland to meet in Turku on October 8, 1742. Each city was to send one from nobility and two from clergy, bourgeoisie and peasants to discuss matters important for the "cities and the whole country". Encouraged by Russia's' earlier promises of independence, friendly occupation and their own apparent willingness to seize the moment, Finns presented the general with the decision to ask Duke Peter of Holstein-Gottorp to be the King of Finland. At the same time, in Stockholm, trying to find a way out of the military and political situation, as King Frederick I was without an heir apparent, the Swedish estates decided to use the future crown in negotiations, also selecting the same Duke as the next King of Sweden.

However the political situation was already outgrowing earlier promises. Russian troops had taken over Finland with such ease, that Elizabeth had not only dropped the idea of making Finland a puppet state, but planned to turn the whole of Sweden into one. Also, since she was without an heir apparent herself as well, she had decided to make Duke Peter her own heir to the Imperial throne. The Duke, it would seem, never got to know about his election to the ephemeral throne of Finland, word of Elizabeth's new mood reached Turku before the delegation had even got started for Saint Petersburg and the Russians effectively stopped the process there.

But they tried again in 1919 ... This time steps to institute a "Kingdom of Finland" were taken briefly in the aftermath of Finnish independence from Russia. Prince Frederick of Hesse was elected King by the Parliament of Finland, on 9 October 1918. With the end of World War I, in light of his German birth, and the abdication of Kaiser Wilhelm ending monarchies in Germany, the arrangement was considered untenable by influential Finns of the time, and by Frederick himself. Frederick Charles renounced the throne on 14 December 1918. Finland subsequently adopted a republican constitution.

The only royal buried in Finland is the wife of King Eric XIV, Karin Månsdotter. Karin was working as a maid to the King's sister, Princess Elisabet Vasa, when she became mistress to the King. Eric XIV married Karin morganatically in 1567, and officially in 1568, when she was ennobled and crowned Queen under the name Katarina Magnusdotter. Queen Karin and her children were removed from her husband in 1573 to prevent the birth of any more legitimate children, and they were taken to the Castle in Åbo in Finland where she remained under house arrest until the death of her husband four years later. In 1575, the custody of her son was taken from her; he was taken to Poland and placed under the care of the Jesuits, but she was allowed to keep her daughter. In 1577, she received the news of her husband's death, but she was treated with kindness and given a manor in Finland, where she lived the rest of her life.
Karin became respected and liked in Finland; during the great peasant-rebellion in 1596-1597, the rebels refrained from plundering her estate. She is buried in the Cathedral of Turku.

Eric XIV also seems to be a QI chap - Striving for useful political alliances, Eric made unsuccessful marriage proposals to, among others, Elizabeth I of England (1533–1603) and Mary I of Scotland (1542–67). Eric died imprisoned in Örbyhus Castle: according to folklore, his final meal was a poisoned bowl of pea soup.

anyway .. now its time for bed ...

Mark.

 
Davini994
195625.  Fri Jul 27, 2007 6:41 pm Reply with quote

Is there an explanation as to why there so many little islands in the area?

 
Neotenic
195704.  Sat Jul 28, 2007 8:41 am Reply with quote

In Finland, apparently July 27th is Sleepy Head Day, where the last person out of bed is either woken ratjer unceremoniously by having water dumped over them or, even worse, by getting carried out of bed and chucked into a lake.

I think that if I lived in Finland, I would probably take to using a wetsuit as pajamas.

 
markvent
195980.  Mon Jul 30, 2007 3:56 am Reply with quote

Neotenic wrote:
In Finland, apparently July 27th is Sleepy Head Day, where the last person out of bed is either woken ratjer unceremoniously by having water dumped over them or, even worse, by getting carried out of bed and chucked into a lake.

I think that if I lived in Finland, I would probably take to using a wetsuit as pajamas.


post 195599 beatcha! ;)

Mark.

 
Davini994
196181.  Mon Jul 30, 2007 10:22 am Reply with quote

dr.bob wrote:
So if you fall out of a boat and start drowning near Iceland, you're likely to be faced with the sight of a gunboat bearing down on you?

Superb! :)


No problem. Just hide behind an islands - there's loads!

 
CaptTimmy
196324.  Tue Jul 31, 2007 3:23 am Reply with quote

Q.Which country is home to the deadliest sniper of World War II?

F. Germany, Soviet Union or any other major player of WWII

A. Finland, home to Simo Häyhä, the most prolific sniper is the history of.......ever

Quote:
Quote:
During the Winter War (1939 – 1940) between Finland and the Soviet Union, he began his duty as a sniper against the Red Army. Working in temperatures between −20 to −40 degrees Celsius, and dressed completely in a white camouflage suit, Häyhä was credited with 505 confirmed kills against Soviet soldiers.

The unofficial Finnish frontline figure from the battle field of Kollaa places the number of Häyhä's sniper kills at 542. A daily account of the kills at Kollaa was conducted for the Finnish snipers. Häyhä used a Finnish variant, M28, of the Soviet Mosin-Nagant rifle (known as "Pystykorva" rifle), because it suited his small frame (5 ft/1.52 m). He preferred to use iron sights rather than telescopic sights to present a smaller target (the sniper must raise their head higher when using telescopic sights) and aid concealment (sun reflecting off telescopic sight lenses can reveal a sniper's position).

Besides his sniper kills, Simo Häyhä was also credited with two hundred kills with a submachine gun, thus bringing his credited kills to at least 705.[citation needed] All of Häyhä's kills were accomplished within 100 days prior to injuries caused by an enemy bullet. Before his injury, the Russians tried several plans to get rid of him, including counter snipers and artillery strikes. Their best result was tearing the back of his coat away with shrapnel, but leaving Häyhä himself unscratched.

 
seleeni
215130.  Sun Sep 30, 2007 1:23 pm Reply with quote

Sergei wrote:
An interesting story told to me by a Finn (and which I'm afraid I haven't been able to confirm) is that Nokia, founded as a timber milling company deep in the forests, donated a small amount of stock to help the local community. This stock is now so immensely valuable that the community has trouble spending the money...


This story is partly true. There was a Finn called Onni Nurmi who travelled in America and was later a janitor in Finland. In his will he left Nokia stocks to the municipality of Pukkila in 1959. There was a dispute over how the money should be used, because Onni had stated that it should benefit only the elderly. As the value of the stock rose, many villagers requested "their share" of the money. Currently the Onni Nurmi Foundation is responsible for the implementation of the will and oversees that the money is spent on services for Pukkila's elderly. The latest development is a well-equipped service centre called Onninkartano, which was opened in September 2007.

Nokia company later moved from wood to rubber products and even today Finns associate Nokia not only with mobile phones, but also sturdy, quality rubber boots. These are not made by the phone company. They make phones.

 
Mulvil
218589.  Tue Oct 09, 2007 4:34 am Reply with quote

Finland also has the worlds cleanest water according to a UNESCO report.

source


Could trick people by phrasing a question "according to a unesco report....." because the like of Antartica probably weren't tested

 
epicurian riddler
278680.  Sat Feb 16, 2008 5:32 pm Reply with quote

In 1996 a young Finnish man called Linus Torvalds completed a masters degree in computer science at Helsinki University and produced a thesis called 'Linux: A Portable Operating System'.

His idea would be that it would be possible to produce and make availible an alternative to commercial operating systems. People could download this free of charge from the internet, with the basic codes also availible for anyone who wished to tinker with them.

He made the idea a reality and it took off, firstly among his fellow hackers. He then attracted some heavyweight commercial backers who saw the advantage in challenging Microsoft's stranglehold. In 2001, IBM put £170 million into a three-year Linux development programme.

Linux has quite a few advantages over its commercial rivals - primarily, it's free. Since Microsoft's business plan had, ironically, brought down the cost of hardware, Linux has the capability to reduce the price of operating systems to a new low. Linux professionals working in small companies for customising and repairing systems will sometimes charge small fees, but these are dwarfed by the cost of buying and maintaining Windows.

Secondly, and this is perhaps the most important difference in the culture of Linux VS Microsoft, all the underlying codes are freely availible. This means that the speed of innovation in Linux programming is held back only by the rate at which its many thousands of highly-skilled computer literate users can see potential improvements (while normal users can also install and run Linux without expertise)

Users can discuss problems with the operating system openly on Linux web forums. This means that the public can solve them by tapping into a worldwide community of experts and without having to pay a corporate employee to do the work. The principle is that, since the operating software is availible for nothing, users have a commensurate obligation to share knowledge of it.

Perhaps most surprisingly, Linux users are able to tap into Microsoft programs if they choose to, because Linux has the facility to store a complete replica of Windows inside itself, like a ship in a bottle. There are legal issues surrounding this, but the principle remains one of discretion.
This alone puts a big question mark over whether Microsoft can really be considered to have a monopoly, since it's possible to use it's products on an open-source Linux system.

Recently, Brazil announced that it's shifting it's entire government computer network at a projected saving of £70 million a year. In Germany, the city of Munich will install the free system in the computers of 14,000 civil servants. And a report in the UK from the Office of Government Commerce in October 2004 concluded that changing to Linux software 'could generate significant savings'.

Perhaps the days of commercial operating systems like Windows are numbered.

 
3cheeseshigh
279037.  Sun Feb 17, 2008 11:57 am Reply with quote

Finland, Finland, Finland,
The country where I want to be,
Pony trekking or camping,
Or just watching TV.
Finland, Finland, Finland.
It's the country for me.

You're so near to Russia,
So far from Japan,
Quite a long way from Cairo,
Lots of miles from Vietnam.

Finland, Finland, Finland,
The country where I want to be,
Eating breakfast or dinner,
Or snack lunch in the hall.
Finland, Finland, Finland.
Finland has it all.


You're so sadly neglected
And often ignored,
A poor second to Belgium,
When going abroad.

Finland, Finland, Finland,
The country where I quite want to be,
Your mountains so lofty,
Your treetops so tall.
Finland, Finland, Finland.
Finland has it all.

Finland, Finland, Finland,
The country where I quite want to be,
Your mountains so lofty,
Your treetops so tall.
Finland, Finland, Finland.
Finland has it all.

Finland has it all.

 
djgordy
279121.  Sun Feb 17, 2008 1:30 pm Reply with quote

Finland is also famous for Touko Laaksonen, also known as Tom of Finland.



http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tom_of_Finland

Less salaciously, it is also famous for the Kalevala, the national epic poem which inspired Grieg to write "The Swan of Tuonela"

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swan_of_TuonelaThe Kalevala was most likely a big influence on Tokien and his big book, the name of which escapes me.....

Quote:
I also hope that my son’s interest in the Ring Trilogy will someday lead him to the Kalevala, from which Tolkien took many of his story ideas. The Kalevala “is fundamentally a story of a sacred object which has power, and the pursuit of the mythic heroes who seek that power, to seek a way of understanding what that power means.” Väinämöinen is a wise old man with a long gray beard who has magical powers. He must destroy a forged magical mill called the “Sampo.” The bearer of the Sampo is given great wealth but becomes greedy. Therefore, for the good of everyone, the Sampo must be destroyed. If you’ve seen the latest Ring Trilogy movies or read the books, this should sound very familiar. Gandalf, in the Lord of the Rings, is a wise old man with a long gray beard (Väinämöinen!) who has magical powers. He must destroy the forged object of power, a ring, for the good of everyone. Whether through the Kalevala or the Ring Trilogy, it is gratifying to know that the ancient wisdom of our ancestors, so sorely needed in today’s world, is being passed down to today’s generation.


http://www.fingerlakesfinns.org/articles/influence.htm



"Lemminkainen's Mother" by Akseli Gallen-Kallela

 

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