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Canned, Capernoited, Capsized, Carousing, Clobbered, Coopere

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MatC
16634.  Fri Mar 25, 2005 11:26 am Reply with quote

Q: What on Earth is wrong with the youth of today?
A: Lager.

A letter in The Independent (some time in July 2004, I think) from Peter Haydon, Secretary of The British Guild of Beer Writers, suggests that allegedly rising rates of street violence in Britain might be linked to the decline in proper beer, and the rise of filthy foreign muck. He writes: “hops are highly soporific. So whilst after six pints of indifferent lager many a young man is ready for a fight, his bitter-drinking counterpart after the same amount is usually looking for a nice, quite snooze. Strangely, participants in the alcohol debate studiously avoid any discussion of what people drink, preferring only to discuss how much.”

 
Gaazy
16640.  Fri Mar 25, 2005 12:22 pm Reply with quote

My 24-year-old son had a letter published in the Times the other day in which he urged readers to drink beer rather than lager.

It isn't a new message (v. Camra and similar organisations), but my son wasn't prepared for the deluge of congratulatory cards and letters that came to the house following publication of his contribution.

 
MatC
16660.  Sat Mar 26, 2005 5:37 am Reply with quote

No more than is his right, Gaazy; your boy fights a noble cause. Yes, bitter it should be, indeed (for anyone who is not strong enough to drink cider.)

In my post above I left out the crucial point - that lager is (apparently) less hopped than bitter.

It occurs to me that Cider itself ought to be a good topic ... for jokes, at least, if not for facts.

 
MatC
16834.  Tue Mar 29, 2005 6:50 am Reply with quote

“Fragments of stone tablets discovered by Victorian explorers in the [Tigris-Euphrates] region show that another type [of beer] known as kash was used as currency or as an instrument of barter if it was not consumed by those who brewed it, and records describe how the stonemasons who built the pyramids were paid in beer.”
- “Man walks into a pub: a sociable history of beer” by Pete Brown (Macmillan, 2003).

 
MatC
16835.  Tue Mar 29, 2005 6:52 am Reply with quote

According to William of Malmesbury, the reason Harold lost at Hastings in 1066 was because his army, having just won an unlikely victory against the Vikings at York, had celebrated too well. They were therefore hungover when they arrived at Hastings, and engaged the enemy “more with rashness and precipitate fury than with military skill.”
- “Man walks into a pub: a sociable history of beer” by Pete Brown (Macmillan, 2003).
And so began the most terrible tyranny under which these islands have ever suffered. All because of extended opening hours.

 
eggshaped
16836.  Tue Mar 29, 2005 6:57 am Reply with quote

Quote:
beer known as kash was used as currency


Could be a possible cash/kash play-on-words here?

 
MatC
16837.  Tue Mar 29, 2005 7:17 am Reply with quote

According to Brown, the OED gives "cash" a European origin; but as he says, it's a remarkable coincidence.

 
Gaazy
16838.  Tue Mar 29, 2005 7:18 am Reply with quote

MatC wrote:
According to William of Malmesbury, the reason Harold lost at Hastings in 1066 was because his army, having just won an unlikely victory against the Vikings at York, had celebrated too well. They were therefore hungover when they arrived at Hastings, and engaged the enemy “more with rashness and precipitate fury than with military skill.”


The same sort of thing happened c. 600 AD when 300 Celtic warriors assembled for a year's mead-drinking before ill-advisedly trying to take on 3,000 invading Saxons at Catraeth, probably present-day Catterick. The whole massacre (only 3 Celts survived) was immortalised by Aneirin, a poet of the same period. Here's a translation of a small part of his epic poem -

Quote:
Men went to Catraeth at dawn:
Their high spirits lessened their life-spans.
They drank mead, gold and sweet, ensnaring;
For a year the minstrels were merry.
Men went to Catraeth, they were renowned.
Wine and mead from gold cups was their drink,
A year in noble ceremonial,
Three hundred and sixty-three gold-torqued men.
Of all those who charged, after too much drink,
But three won free through courage in strife,
Aeron's two war-hounds and tough Cynon,
And myself, soaked in blood, for my song's sake.

 
MatC
16841.  Tue Mar 29, 2005 7:44 am Reply with quote

In 1872 the Liberal government, under pressure from its allies in the temperance movement, introduced a Licensing Act, under which pubs were obliged to close between midnight (in London; 11pm elsewhere) and 6am. (Imagine having to wait until six for the first beer of the day!)
When it became apparent that this law applied only to pubs - “but not to the clubs frequented by the gentry” - riots broke out. “Mobs took to the streets chanting, ‘Britons never shall be slaves,’ and seeking out teetotallers on whom to vent their spleen*, until troops were called in to disperse them. The Liberals went on to lose the 1874 general election, and Gladstone reflected, ’We have been borne down on a torrent of gin and beer.’”
- “Man walks into a pub: a sociable history of beer” by Pete Brown (Macmillan, 2003).
*(They come over here, marrying our women and stealing our jobs - why don’t they all piss off back to Teetotalia?)

 
MatC
17133.  Mon Apr 04, 2005 6:48 am Reply with quote

The Pilgrim fathers chose their landing place in America, the Mayflower’s journal says, because they simply couldn't go on any further, “our victuals being much spent, especially our beere.”
S: “Man walks into a pub: a sociable history of beer” by Pete Brown (Macmillan, 2003).

 
MatC
17163.  Tue Apr 05, 2005 4:45 am Reply with quote

Elizabeth I was a famous beer drinker - and she liked the strong stuff, too. She routinely drank a quart for breakfast, and the Earl of Leicester noted “her own beer was so strong as there was no man able to drink it.”
S: “Man walks into a pub: a sociable history of beer” by Pete Brown (Macmillan, 2003).

 
Jenny
17183.  Tue Apr 05, 2005 8:45 am Reply with quote

Beer was a normal breakfast drink in those days, though usually it was 'small beer', which was weaker. Probably because the water wasn't safe though!

Samuel Pepys, in his diary, speaks regularly of the various pubs he goes to for his 'morning draught' of beer.

 
MatC
17211.  Wed Apr 06, 2005 5:00 am Reply with quote

Benjamin Franklin, when working as a printer in London, eccentrically drank water instead of beer, and was thus nicknamed by his workmates “Water-American.” Witty; very.
S: “Man walks into a pub: a sociable history of beer” by Pete Brown (Macmillan, 2003).

 
Gray
17219.  Wed Apr 06, 2005 6:27 am Reply with quote

There is some genetic basis to alcohol tolerance, as can be seen in the low tolerance levels of Japanese and Chinese populations. If you don't have an important gene for completing the breakdown sequence for alcohol, you're going to fall off your bar stool:
Quote:
Alcohol is metabolized principally in the liver, where it is converted first to acetaldehyde by the enzyme alcohol dehydrogenase. Acetaldehyde is then converted to acetate by the enzyme aldehyde dehydrogenase. Acetaldehyde produces unpleasant physiological reactions even at low concentration, so the presence or absence of the gene mutation affecting aldehyde dehydrogenase in turn affects drinking behaviors. When acetaldehyde is not rapidly converted to acetate the results are dramatic: a rapid increase in blood flow to the skin of the face, neck, and chest, rapid heartbeat, headache, nausea, and extreme drowsiness occur. "


I've seen some theories that suggest that the gene mutation isn't common among westerners (who can drink their oriental business associates under the table), because of the history of brewing in the west as a way to disinfect water, and as the natural by-product of storing moist grain over winters for thousands of years.

 
Jenny
17234.  Wed Apr 06, 2005 9:40 am Reply with quote

That's interesting - I wonder if there's been any research done in native American populations, who are reputed to be bad at dealing with the effects of alcohol.

 

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