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Eye for an Eye

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Bunter
164661.  Wed Apr 11, 2007 2:52 am Reply with quote

This got my pals:

Q: Where does the expression “an eye for an eye” come from?

F: The Bible, Shakespeare, The Iliad

A: A very old rock

Quote:
The Code of Hammurabi is one of the earliest known examples of human laws being defined and written down in an orderly way. Little is known about Hammurabi himself; he ruled Babylon nearly four millennia ago, from roughly 1792-1750 B.C. The code has 282 entries covering all sorts of civil interactions, from inheritance to theft to slave ownership. Some of the laws are general (anyone caught committing a robbery shall be put to death) and others quite specific ("If any one hire an ox-driver, he shall pay him six gur of corn per year"). The code's best-known dictum is "If a man put out the eye of another man, his eye shall be put out" -- commonly quoted as "An eye for an eye."


http://www.answers.com/topic/hammurabi

 
Flash
164668.  Wed Apr 11, 2007 3:48 am Reply with quote

Also Exodus ch 21 vv 23-25:

Quote:
If any harm follows, then you shall give life for life, eye for eye, tooth for tooth, hand for hand, foot for foot, burn for burn, wound for wound, stripe for stripe.


Leviticus ch 24 vv 19-20:

Quote:
Anyone who maims another shall suffer the same injury in return: fracture for fracture, eye for eye, tooth for tooth; the injury inflicted is the injury to be suffered.


Deuteronomy ch 19 v 21:

Quote:
Show no pity: life for life, eye for eye, tooth for tooth, hand for hand, foot for foot.


The Code of Hammurabi was only re-discovered in 1901, so anyone who used the expression before that date must have been quoting the Bible, I think.

 
Bunter
164673.  Wed Apr 11, 2007 4:00 am Reply with quote

Quote:
The Code of Hammurabi was only re-discovered in 1901, so anyone who used the expression before that date must have been quoting the Bible, I think.


Are you suggesting it's sheer coincidence that the writers of The Bible included it?! Shurely not.

Either way, it still doesn't affect the merit of the question in my book.

 
Flash
164721.  Wed Apr 11, 2007 5:37 am Reply with quote

OK

 
calindreams
418895.  Tue Oct 07, 2008 9:55 am Reply with quote

I have heard it argued somewhere that rather the 'eye for an eye' law representing retrubution, it actually served to limit retribution. Better an 'eye for an eye' than 'their whole family for an eye'.

 
QiScorpion
506059.  Tue Feb 17, 2009 9:22 am Reply with quote

I believe Mahatma(sp?) Ghandi once said "An eye for an eye and the world will go blind."
The pacifist's motto, no?

 
Jenny
506108.  Tue Feb 17, 2009 11:24 am Reply with quote

QiScorpion wrote:
Mahatma(sp?) Ghandi


Mahatma Gandhi. Mahatma is an honorific - his actual name was Mohandas.

 
CB27
506243.  Tue Feb 17, 2009 1:39 pm Reply with quote

You have to remember that the old testament as we know it was compiled over a number of years and the earliest form for any stories we can give some kind of evidence for is from the 12th century BC, sometime after the age of Hammurabi. Prior to this time these stories, their moral teachings and codes of laws were often passed on orally or written in other forms not associated with the Old Testament.

That the specific language of the two are very similar is not surprisnig, neither is the fact that several writings from Egypt and other civilisations of the area will sound similar to passages in the Bible, this is because the Old Testament started out as a political tool to gather codes of law and define them in an identifiable format. If you disassociate it from religion it is a brilliant collection of old laws and thoughts from people who lived four to five thousand years ago.

 

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