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aahaavis
976149.  Sun Feb 24, 2013 3:51 pm Reply with quote

Jenny wrote:
Oh I love that! Will steal all those Ks for K series research...



Well, now that I think about it, "kokko" is actually a special kind of bonfire for the midsummer night. Usual bonfire would be "nuotio".

Here's my new translation:

-Collect all the wood for the midsummer night bonfire.
-All the wood for the midsummer night bonfire?
-Yes, all the wood.




(I should also note that in the original one the word for wood is omitted and the literal translation of the first sentence would say "collect the whole midsummernight bonfire", but a Finn would understand it as how I translated it above)

 
suze
976171.  Sun Feb 24, 2013 6:10 pm Reply with quote

aahaavis wrote:
Another interesting thing that Karlsson also says in his book is that "Suomi" (Finland in Finnish) is one of the most used words of Finnish language. Maybe it means Finns are very nationalistic?


Perhaps they are!

There is in fact another piece of language-related evidence for that, which may indeed be part of the explanation for the relatively low incidence of loan words.

In most languages, words for modern concepts which originate in the English-speaking world are borrowed from English. So for instance, in most languages the word for "television" is something which is recognizably similar - French télévision, Polish telewizja, Arabic talafazi, and so on.

Finnish, together with German and Icelandic, has tried to avoid this and has concocted some improbable words of its own for modern concepts. In German a lot of those have fallen out of use since WWII (Telefon is by now much more common than Fernsprechapparat), and indeed in more recent time Finnish has started to drop some of them too (trains increasingly stop at the station, rather than at the rautatieasema).

Icelandic still resists - to this day, an Icelander might give you a call on her farmálţráđur (cellphone, literally "moving talking wire") before sitting down to watch sjónvarp (television, literally "seeing thrower-out"), all made possible by the wonders of rafmagn (electricity, literally "amber magic").

 
aahaavis
997728.  Sun May 19, 2013 2:55 pm Reply with quote

suze wrote:
(trains increasingly stop at the station, rather than at the rautatieasema).


I don't think that's true. I've never heard that, nor does it sound like something that would be used. It is true that it is more common to say just "asema" instead of "rautatieasema", exactly how you might say "station" instead of "train station" in English.

"television" is "televisio" in Finnish (altough it is shorted to "telkkari", "telkku" or something like that in colloquial language)

 
Saerdna
1052403.  Fri Jan 31, 2014 5:09 am Reply with quote

sry for my english in advance. =)

what i know about the Finnish language:
they use the swedish alphabet, but use it more logical than us swedes.
like:
if you know how each letter is pronounced in finnish you know how the words is pronounced.
unlike the swedish, were it could be spelled exactly the same and pronounced different. and not even an apostrophe to help...
like:
rom (rome)
rom (alcohol drink/rum)
rom (fish eggs/spawn)
rom (person with origin from rome)
this is just one example that shows words with different pronunciation and still looks the same, which make it harder for immigrants to learn swedish.

and in finnish
the finnish o is pronounced o and nothing else..

(ofc this is from my own experience, so please correct me if im wrong)

 
Saerdna
1053679.  Wed Feb 05, 2014 3:26 am Reply with quote

2 finnish war against the russians:

the "winter war"
Russian strength .VS. Finnish Strength
998,100 men (overall) .VS. 337,000–346,500 men
2,514–6,541 tanks .VS. 32 tanks
3,880 aircraft .VS. 114 aircraft

Russian .VS. Finnish Casualties (dead or missing)
126,875 dead .VS. 25,904 dead
188,671 wounded .VS. 43,557 wounded
3,543 tanks .VS. 20–30 tanks
261–515 aircraft .VS. 62 aircraft

--------------------------------------------
Finnish civil war
white guards vs red guards

white guard supporters: mostly finnish soldiers
White Finland
White Guards
Jäger Movement
German Empire
Swedish volunteers
Estonian volunteers
Polish volunteers

red guard supporters: mostly finnish soldiers
Red Finland
Red Guards
Russian SFSR

Strength
red .vs. white (total)
90000-100000 VS 90000-105737

Casualties:
red .VS. white
33,100 .VS. 5,600


I know the civil war was mostly done by finnish soldier but supported by soviet republic.

but still, look at the difference in strength and casualties =)
really impressive...

 
AlmondFacialBar
1053682.  Wed Feb 05, 2014 4:07 am Reply with quote

suze wrote:
aahaavis wrote:
Another interesting thing that Karlsson also says in his book is that "Suomi" (Finland in Finnish) is one of the most used words of Finnish language. Maybe it means Finns are very nationalistic?


Perhaps they are!

There is in fact another piece of language-related evidence for that, which may indeed be part of the explanation for the relatively low incidence of loan words.

In most languages, words for modern concepts which originate in the English-speaking world are borrowed from English. So for instance, in most languages the word for "television" is something which is recognizably similar - French télévision, Polish telewizja, Arabic talafazi, and so on.

Finnish, together with German and Icelandic, has tried to avoid this and has concocted some improbable words of its own for modern concepts. In German a lot of those have fallen out of use since WWII (Telefon is by now much more common than Fernsprechapparat), and indeed in more recent time Finnish has started to drop some of them too (trains increasingly stop at the station, rather than at the rautatieasema).

Icelandic still resists - to this day, an Icelander might give you a call on her farmálţráđur (cellphone, literally "moving talking wire") before sitting down to watch sjónvarp (television, literally "seeing thrower-out"), all made possible by the wonders of rafmagn (electricity, literally "amber magic").


Irish is also quite good at that. E-mail is rhiomhphost. On the other hand, stockbroker is stocbhroiceir, so consistency is not really their thing...

All time favourite in that regard is a Low Saxon one, though. Mobile phone translates into Ackersnacker, i.e. field chatting device. Lovely, no?

:-)

AlmondFacialBar


Last edited by AlmondFacialBar on Wed May 07, 2014 2:21 am; edited 1 time in total

 
lehtisaari
1069442.  Thu Apr 17, 2014 4:13 pm Reply with quote

[quote="aahaavis"][quote="Jenny"]Oh I love that! Will steal all those Ks for K series research...[/quote]


Well, now that I think about it, "kokko" is actually a special kind of bonfire for the midsummer night. Usual bonfire would be "nuotio".

Here's my new translation:

-Collect all the wood for the midsummer night bonfire.
-All the wood for the midsummer night bonfire?
-Yes, all the wood.


(I should also note that in the original one the word for wood is omitted and the literal translation of the first sentence would say "collect the whole midsummernight bonfire", but a Finn would understand it as how I translated it above)[/quote]

nah "kokko" is just big bonfire. now you might make a big bonfire for example if you are getting rid of old tables and stuff. you would not say nuotio. "nuotio" is just small bonfire to make when you want to make some food or something.
juhannuskokko is the special midsummer bonfire.

 
remainsme
1071911.  Wed Apr 30, 2014 6:45 pm Reply with quote

lehtisaari wrote:
aahaavis wrote:
Jenny wrote:
Oh I love that! Will steal all those Ks for K series research...



Well, now that I think about it, "kokko" is actually a special kind of bonfire for the midsummer night. Usual bonfire would be "nuotio".

Here's my new translation:

-Collect all the wood for the midsummer night bonfire.
-All the wood for the midsummer night bonfire?
-Yes, all the wood.


(I should also note that in the original one the word for wood is omitted and the literal translation of the first sentence would say "collect the whole midsummernight bonfire", but a Finn would understand it as how I translated it above)


nah "kokko" is just big bonfire. now you might make a big bonfire for example if you are getting rid of old tables and stuff. you would not say nuotio. "nuotio" is just small bonfire to make when you want to make some food or something.
juhannuskokko is the special midsummer bonfire.


Kokko is large bonfire or fire used as to selebrate occasions, such as mid night summer or easter or just a very big fire. finnish language is very complicated

 
Jenny
1072007.  Thu May 01, 2014 10:00 am Reply with quote

Thank you remainsme, and welcome to the QI forums :-)

 

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