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Finland

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costean
276908.  Wed Feb 13, 2008 2:56 pm Reply with quote

According to the National Land Survey of Finland and the Finnish Environment Institute, Finland has the following:

Approx
179,000 islands with an area of 100 m sq or more
188,000 Lakes with an area of 500 m sq or more
of which 56,000 have an area of 10,000 m sq or more

I don’t think anyone has counted the total number of islands in Canada although they have counted the number of sea islands (approx 53,000 – linked below). Islands which appeared as no more than a dot on a 1:250,000 scale map were not included. Canada does have three of the world’s ten largest islands (Baffin, Victoria and Ellesmere).

In fact, the combined area of Finland, Portugal, Belgium and Switzerland is less than that of Canada’s largest island - Baffin Island (pop 1 moose).

http://www.stat.fi/tup/suoluk/suoluk_alue_en.html#Geographical
http://atlas.nrcan.gc.ca/site/english/learningresources/facts/islands.html
http://www.ewebglobe.com/islands.html

 
Davini994
476170.  Sun Jan 11, 2009 12:57 pm Reply with quote

On the Finnish flag, blue represents lakes and the sky, and white represents snow and the white nights of the Finnish summer.

s: http://www.tiscali.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/countryfacts/finland.html
s: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flag_of_Finland

Presumably to match this the British flag should be changed to brown (for all the ugly cities), and grey for the North sea.

 
otyikondo
654960.  Fri Jan 08, 2010 8:54 am Reply with quote

Finland's national anthem is of course NOT the hymn from Jean Sibelius's Finlandia, though there are a good many people in the country who feel it ought to be.

However, the Finlandia Hymn was the national anthem of Biafra of all places, in the short window of independence between 1967 and 1970.

Interestingly, Finland was not among those countries that recognised Biafra. And the Biafrans decided that rather than call their anthem "Land of the Midnight Sun" (which would have been plain silly) or "Land of a Thousand Lakes", they would dub it "Land of the Rising Sun".

Just to confuse any Japanese tourists who happened by.

 
krollo
842475.  Wed Aug 31, 2011 12:13 pm Reply with quote

Finland is home to the world mosquito killing championship.

 
Jenny
842849.  Thu Sep 01, 2011 10:56 am Reply with quote

A friend of mine spent some time last year in the woods in Finland, and she'd agree with you. Welcome to QI krollo.

 
bg2
888909.  Fri Feb 24, 2012 4:52 pm Reply with quote

Finland still uses conscription to create a big reserve instead of simply professional army. About 66% of men go through it, a growing number is choosing civil service or just C classification which means you don't have to do it at all. Duration of service is 6, 9 or 12 months.

In service they told us that a majority of Finns are still for mandatory service, but lately I've read news that almost half of Finns are actually against it.

The civil service lasts a year, and then there's the fourth option of saying no to all options, and going to prison for 4 months. Getting the C-classification papers seems to be a commong thing and topic on the internet.

Nothing quite interesting here though, just felt like writing it down.

And just for the record, I quite liked the service myself.

 
Jenny
888910.  Fri Feb 24, 2012 4:56 pm Reply with quote

Welcome! Does choosing C classification mean they do their conscription period as a civil servant?

 
otyikondo
888934.  Fri Feb 24, 2012 6:51 pm Reply with quote

bg2 wrote:
Finland still uses conscription to create a big reserve instead of simply professional army. About 66% of men go through it, a growing number is choosing civil service or just C classification which means you don't have to do it at all. Duration of service is 6, 9 or 12 months.

In service they told us that a majority of Finns are still for mandatory service, but lately I've read news that almost half of Finns are actually against it.

The civil service lasts a year, and then there's the fourth option of saying no to all options, and going to prison for 4 months. Getting the C-classification papers seems to be a commong thing and topic on the internet.

Nothing quite interesting here though, just felt like writing it down.

And just for the record, I quite liked the service myself.


Almost half being against it could be seen as meaning a majority are for it, but the post is correct in that support is on the wane, for a good many reasons. The only QI thing is perhaps that Finland is now (after Sweden made moves recently to drop conscription) practically in a minority of one in Western Europe. Oh, and women CAN do it, too, but also have a 45-day get out free clause if they don't fancy it.

Support for conscription waning (HS 2.2.2012)

 
AlmondFacialBar
888938.  Fri Feb 24, 2012 6:58 pm Reply with quote

Even Germany has, for the time being, suspended conscription, because the sheer number of guys who's have had to be conscribed no longer fitted with current NATO strategies. As, however, German social services have traditionally been heavily dependent on conscentious objectors to keep going, it's been replaced with the Federal Volunteer Service that allows both men and women to volunteer in all sorts of services for between six months and two years, from social work to joining the defence forces after all.

:-)

AlmondFacialBar


Last edited by AlmondFacialBar on Fri Feb 24, 2012 8:01 pm; edited 1 time in total

 
suze
888947.  Fri Feb 24, 2012 7:59 pm Reply with quote

Poland dropped conscription in 2008, partly because it didn't really have anything useful for the conscripts to do, and partly because it had been suggested that draft-dodging was one of the reasons why a lot of fit young men were emigrating.

The other Western nations which still have conscription are:

Austria - similar model to Germany, and old peoples' homes are heavily reliant on conscripts.
Denmark - only for four months, and only for those selected by a lottery. Six months VSO is an alternative.
Norway - the Armed Forces want it abolished but the politicians don't. Said to be very easy to avoid.
Switzerland - a complicated system that the Swiss seem to like. It is whispered that it's possible to "buy" failing the medical and hence being excused.

 
AlmondFacialBar
888950.  Fri Feb 24, 2012 8:02 pm Reply with quote

suze wrote:
Switzerland - a complicated system that the Swiss seem to like. It is whispered that it's possible to "buy" failing the medical and hence being excused.


It's basically a militia, isn't it? I find it somewhat hard to figure how such an army can be kept efficient and up to date, but there we go, it seems to work for them.

:-)

AlmondFacialBar

 
Zebra57
888953.  Fri Feb 24, 2012 8:23 pm Reply with quote

A very naughty person from Finland

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/europe/finland/9097513/First-Man-of-Finland-caught-gawping-at-Danish-princesss-breasts.html

 
suze
888954.  Fri Feb 24, 2012 8:26 pm Reply with quote

AFB wrote:
It's basically a militia, isn't it?


Yes it is. Every able bodied male does 260 days of military service (or civilian alternative, in which each day worked only counts as 2/3 of a day), but not necessarily all in one go. Even most of the officers are reservists who are only there for a few weeks at a time.

The term "armed forces" is a bit of a misnomer, because the Swiss Army is largely unarmed. Everyone has the option to make a declaration that they do not wish to carry a weapon, and only the small permanent army (about 4,000 professional soldiers) are allowed ammunition. The Swiss peacekeepers in Bosnia were entirely unarmed, although the Swiss delegation at the Korean border (all five of them!) are career soldiers and are armed.

The Swiss Guard at the Vatican is not part of the Swiss Army; although they are careful not to use the word, they are mercenaries. Recruits must be German-speaking males of Swiss nationality who have completed Swiss military service and are Roman Catholic.

 
otyikondo
888966.  Fri Feb 24, 2012 9:12 pm Reply with quote

Zebra57 wrote:
A very naughty person from Finland

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/europe/finland/9097513/First-Man-of-Finland-caught-gawping-at-Danish-princesss-breasts.html


Priceless bit of Torygraphism:

The incident provoked a scathing reaction in the Danish press and is unlikely to do much for the country's relationship with neighbouring Finland, which is governed by Mr Arajavi's wife, Tarja Halonen.

Like that's really high on the batting order in Nordic relationships... especially since Leering Pentti there is practically out of the door of the Presidential Palace, along with Auntie Tarja. She's only in office until next Thursday morning, after which the First Man will become the First Lady shown below, who is more likely to get leered at by Crown Prince Frederick, even if she does look a bit like Barney Rubble's wife Betty in this shot. And we aren't neighbours anyway. Unless Sweden's been erased from the map since I last looked at Madeleine's cleavage (much better than Mary's).



I mean, Madeleine now, she's worth getting caught for.

 
bg2
889078.  Sat Feb 25, 2012 1:01 pm Reply with quote

Jenny wrote:
Welcome! Does choosing C classification mean they do their conscription period as a civil servant?


Nope, it means they're "free from service during peace time". People say often jokingly that should a war happen, the "C men" would then be put to front lines to walk on enemy mines and attract enemy artillery fire.

Anyway, if you get C classification it means you don't need to do anything and can go on with your life. It's illegal for employers to ask if the employee has done their service or not as well, but I've read of some interviewers still asking about it.

 

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