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Eating / Escoffier

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Flash
160993.  Thu Mar 29, 2007 4:12 am Reply with quote

Just because he starts with an E, really.

Auguste Escoffier, creator of the Peach Melba (poached peaches in vanilla-flavoured syrup on vanilla ice cream, coated with raspberry puree and named for the Australian soprano Nellie Melba) introduced to Britain the custom of dining "a la Russe". Until Escoffier arrived at the Savoy in 1889 the practice was to bung everything onto the table at the same time (service a la francaise) and let people eat it in whatever order they wanted. Escoffier's approach (learned in France, ironically enough) involved serving one dish at a time with a matched wine, and sorbets between courses.

 
Gray
160996.  Thu Mar 29, 2007 4:23 am Reply with quote

According to the OED, scoff, meaning 'to eat voraciously' came along as a transitive verb in 1849, derived from scaff: food, but as an intransitive verb in 1899. So they might have been related to Escoffier, at least in people's minds, which is enough.

 
Molly Cule
161003.  Thu Mar 29, 2007 4:38 am Reply with quote

This isn't related to Escoffier (sorry Flash) but it is about eating, kind of so rather than start another eating thread...... it's a nice story.

Queen Victoria sent chocolate tins to the troops fighting in the Boer War as a New Years present in January 1900. They said ‘I wish you a happy New Year” signed Victoria, underneath a big picture of the Queen. They also had South Africa 1900 and Victoria's insignia printed on them.

She asked Cadbury to make them, as Quakers they didn't want to be involved with anything to do with war, but they went ahead with the help of fellow Quakers Rowntree and Fry. Fry designed the tins and 40,000 were made and filled with Cadbury's chocolate. There was no brand on the outside but the chocolate said Cadbury's on it.

 
Bunter
161021.  Thu Mar 29, 2007 5:03 am Reply with quote

Escoffier was sacked from the Savoy for accepting bungs from suppliers and he also trained Ho Chi Minh as a pastry chef.

So you win some, and lose some.

 
MatC
161026.  Thu Mar 29, 2007 5:09 am Reply with quote

Bunter wrote:
Escoffier was sacked from the Savoy for accepting bungs from suppliers and he also trained Ho Chi Minh as a pastry chef.


“What do we want?”
“Death to imperialism!”
“When do we want it?”
“After we’ve finished these buns!”

 
Gray
161037.  Thu Mar 29, 2007 5:16 am Reply with quote

And, according to Stephen's Who Do You Think You Are episode, he's related to the famed chocolatier.

 
Molly Cule
161066.  Thu Mar 29, 2007 6:14 am Reply with quote

To Fry the chocolatier? Excellent.
Stephen - what did my great great uncle make for Queen Victoria to send as a New Years present for the troops?

 
eggshaped
161074.  Thu Mar 29, 2007 6:31 am Reply with quote

A cadbury's chocolate bar taken on the Discovery Expedition to the south pole. Doesn't look all that appetising, does it?

 
Frederick The Monk
161122.  Thu Mar 29, 2007 8:08 am Reply with quote

Quote:

“What do we want?”
“Death to imperialism!”
“When do we want it?”
“After we’ve finished these buns!”


Simply glorious - and buns links us back to elephants of course.

 
Frederick The Monk
161123.  Thu Mar 29, 2007 8:12 am Reply with quote

Sadly there seems to be some doubt about whether Escoffier taught Ho Chi Minh. The wiki says:

Quote:
It is claimed that Ho trained as a pastry chef under the legendary French master, Escoffier, at the Carlton Hotel in the Haymarket, Westminster, but there is no evidence to support this.


and gives the following source - Sophie Quinn-Judge, Ho Chi Minh: The Missing Years pp. 20-21, 25, which I haven't read but which looks pretty good.

 
Frederick The Monk
161125.  Thu Mar 29, 2007 8:13 am Reply with quote

Ho Chi Minh was one of the founding members of the French Communist Party.

 
fenifur
920443.  Thu Jun 28, 2012 5:55 pm Reply with quote

Even Mrs Beeton mentions not dining a la russe if you live beyond your means in 1861..!
Perhaps he just started them doing it in the Savoy?
I've also seen in mentioned in a newspaper earlier than that, in terms of how the British in India had picked up the practice earlier than those in the home country.

 
Jenny
920583.  Fri Jun 29, 2012 10:34 am Reply with quote

Welcome fenifur, but that doesn't quite seem to make sense to me. Surely you'd be more likely to over-cater if you dined with all courses on the table at the same time than if they were served one at a time, a la russe?

 
fenifur
920597.  Fri Jun 29, 2012 12:17 pm Reply with quote

I think the idea was that you couldn't spare the staff - not the expense! Plus I think in order to make a table look 'full' for each course it would actually work out as more food doing each course separately, as there were often around 14 courses when it was done that way.
"This style of dining required a large number of servants to ensure that each successive course was delivered and cleared away efficiently. Only the wealthy Victorian and Edwardian host would have been able to have afforded the required number of servants for a traditional, 14 course, dinner service à la Russe. "
Still, I didn't wrote it, ask Mrs Beeton ;p
I was using that as one example to point out that eating a la russe came to Britain far earlier than previously stated. :)


Last edited by fenifur on Fri Jun 29, 2012 12:21 pm; edited 2 times in total

 
fenifur
920598.  Fri Jun 29, 2012 12:18 pm Reply with quote

*write it - although "I didn't wrote it" sounds quite funny when said out loud...

 

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