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Molly Cule
159266.  Fri Mar 23, 2007 8:30 am Reply with quote

The word "time" is the most common noun in the English language, according to the latest Oxford dictionary.

Useful for me as I just spent half an hour reading about the 'speaking clock' thinking 't' for time', in a brain frazzled way thinking that we are on the 'T' series....

The top ten nouns in English are

1 Time
2 Person
3 Year
4 Way
5 Day
6 Thing
7 Man
8 World
9 Life
10 Hand

Quote:
"The thing that struck me when I put together this list was that 90% of the top 100 words were one syllable, and that a large proportion were actually from Old English, meaning the basic words we use all the time in basic sentences are from before the Norman Conquest," he said.

"We always put the focus on new words, changing language and words from other countries, but in reality the basic language we use has been the same for hundreds and hundreds of years."


source http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/5104778.stm

 
Molly Cule
159267.  Fri Mar 23, 2007 8:31 am Reply with quote

I also thought we could have a round of questions about things which are quintessentially ENGLISH, like The Queen, Aston Martins, James Bond and of course er..... the speaking clock!

 
Bunter
159285.  Fri Mar 23, 2007 9:13 am Reply with quote

I think we'll all agree that the speaking clock is an effective exchange in the examination of evolution everywhere.

 
MatC
159303.  Fri Mar 23, 2007 9:51 am Reply with quote

In 16th and 17th century London beggars had their own language, and members of the beggars’ brotherhoods were commanded “Thou shalt not divulge the secret of the canting tongue.” It was made up of Welsh, Irish, Dutch, Cockney and Latin mostly.

Pannass = bread
Patrico = priest
Prat = buttock
Crashing chetes = teeth
Grunting chetes = pigs
Lullaby chetes = children

The originator of the canting tongue was said to have been hanged.

Quote:
By the early seventeenth century this speech was beginning to be represented on the stage and it was dignified with the first of its 'dictionaries' in 1673 when Richard Head published The Canting Academy.

S:
London by Ackroyd
http://education.guardian.co.uk/higher/books/story/0,,514586,00.html

 
DELETED
159311.  Fri Mar 23, 2007 10:00 am Reply with quote

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MatC
159315.  Fri Mar 23, 2007 10:05 am Reply with quote

You're saying you're a cant expert, eh?

 
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159319.  Fri Mar 23, 2007 10:11 am Reply with quote

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Flash
159327.  Fri Mar 23, 2007 10:22 am Reply with quote

You cant be serious.

 
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159332.  Fri Mar 23, 2007 10:25 am Reply with quote

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