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Frank Buckland/Eating

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Bunter
159230.  Fri Mar 23, 2007 7:51 am Reply with quote

Did we cover Frank Buckland in the B series?

He was a zoologist who liked eating exotic animals.

When at Oxford he heard that a panther at Surrey Zoological Gardens had died he asked them to send the corpse to him.

"It had been buried for two days," he recalled, "but I got them to dig it up. It was not very good."

He also tried elephant trunk ("rubbery"), porpoise ("broiled lamp-wick"), rhino ("like very tough beef"), giraffe (like veal).

He said bluebottle was unspeakable and that mole was "utterly horrible".

Frank's father William, geologist and Dean of Westminster, was said to have eaten the embalmed heart of Louis XIV.

 
Flash
159250.  Fri Mar 23, 2007 8:09 am Reply with quote

No, we haven't encountered him. He sounds like a right one.

When did he do this stuff?

"Broiled lamp-wick" is a colourful turn of phrase, for sure.

 
MatC
159254.  Fri Mar 23, 2007 8:11 am Reply with quote

Quote:
He said bluebottle was unspeakable


He makes it sound like it’s the bluebottles’ fault! “How dare you be so unpalatable!”

 
Bunter
159272.  Fri Mar 23, 2007 8:39 am Reply with quote

He's something of an eccentric.

He was overheard at Oxford complaining that earwigs were "horribly bitter."

His father was the one to inspire him:

Quote:
William Buckland set the stage for his son's lifelong appreciation of taste as a diagnostic character in natural history. Guests at the Buckland house might be, and were, served anything from mice to ostrich, along the way including hedgehog, puppy, crocodile and snails. According to Burgess, Richard Owen spent a queasy night after a dinner of roast ostrich at the Bucklands', but John Ruskin regretted having missed the toasted mice. William Buckland himself does not appear to have hesitated in the use of the sense of taste in analyzing the natural world. Visiting a cathedral at which spots of saints' blood were said to be always fresh on the floor, never evaporating or vanishing, Dr. Buckland, with the use of his tongue, determined that the "blood" was in fact bats' urine. He mused in print as to whether the common mole or the blue-bottle fly tasted worse. His approach left quite an impression on young Frank.


His dates are 1826-1880.

http://www.improb.com/airchives/paperair/volume6/v6i6/buckland-6-6.html

 
MatC
159277.  Fri Mar 23, 2007 8:53 am Reply with quote

Have we ever covered people who eat roadkill? It's quite a popular ... um ... hobby? Lifestyle choice?

 
Flash
159287.  Fri Mar 23, 2007 9:23 am Reply with quote

Not as such, but we do seem to have revisited the topic of eating strange animals several times - brown owls (Darwin) and woodlice (cheese logs) spring to mind. Not sure how much appetite we'd have to go there again. I think Alan's fed up with it, apart from anything else.

Notice how well I sustained the eating metaphor in that para?

 
Frederick The Monk
159359.  Fri Mar 23, 2007 11:02 am Reply with quote

I don't really understand why Frank Buckland bothered - from the above quotes it sounds like he hated everything he tried.

 
Frederick The Monk
159360.  Fri Mar 23, 2007 11:02 am Reply with quote

Except giraffe.

 
MatC
159361.  Fri Mar 23, 2007 11:05 am Reply with quote

Well, Fred, I used to work in a pub where one bloke came in once a week just to spend an hour telling the landlord how awful his beer was. Some people live to complain. (“This ham sandwich has got a maggot in it, waiter! And what’s more .... the maggot tastes disgusting!”)

 
edwardepps
821371.  Fri Jun 03, 2011 2:58 pm Reply with quote

MatC wrote:
(“This ham sandwich has got a maggot in it, waiter! And what’s more .... the maggot tastes disgusting!”)

lol))

how to boost low gsm signal with gsm repeater in big office.
GSM Repeater for house.


Last edited by edwardepps on Mon Feb 24, 2014 8:01 am; edited 4 times in total

 
Spud McLaren
821418.  Fri Jun 03, 2011 6:45 pm Reply with quote

My God, ed, surely it hasn't really taken 3 years for that joke to get a laugh?

 
bobwilson
821431.  Fri Jun 03, 2011 8:49 pm Reply with quote

Spud McLaren wrote:
My God, ed, surely it hasn't really taken 3 years for that joke to get a laugh?


Nope - 4 years

 
Spud McLaren
821515.  Sat Jun 04, 2011 8:56 am Reply with quote

I'm rarely accurate to a year or two.

 
Drivian
859977.  Fri Oct 28, 2011 1:44 am Reply with quote

Actually, it is three, i'm hundred sure

 

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