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Eyes

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Molly Cule
156136.  Tue Mar 13, 2007 10:27 am Reply with quote

What contribution have cross-eyed girls made to Western thought/philosophy/??

Descartes had a fetish for cross-eyed women. Once he realised the root of his fascination was a little girl with cross eyes who he played with as a child he was able to start to look at girls who didnít squint with interest.

This insight had philosophical implications he used it as a basis for his defense of free will and the mindís ability to control the body.


Descartes wrote:"I loved a girl of my own age, who was slightly cross-eyed; by which means, the impression made in my brain when I looked at her wandering eyes was joined so much to that which also occurred when the passion of love moved me, that for a long time aftersward, in seeing cross-eyed women, I felt more inclined to love them than others, simply because they had that defect; and i did not know that was the reason. In contrast, since I have reflected on it, and recognized it as a defect, I have no longer been so moved."

http://www.britannica.com/shakespeare/article-43355

 
Flash
156150.  Tue Mar 13, 2007 11:02 am Reply with quote

Eye colour is determined by the amount of melanin in the anterior border (the outermost part of the iris). Melanin is the main pigment found in the human body, and is also responsible for hair colour and skin colour.

If there is much melanin, brown eyes will result. Since the amount of melanin in the iris is genetically determined and is related to the amount of melanin elsewhere in the body, non-white people nearly always have brown eyes.

If there is little melanin, then it won't show up and the apparent colour of the eye will be blue - because the next layer of the iris (the stroma) is made primarily of collagen, which is blue.

If there is a middling amount of melanin, both the melanin and collagen show through, producing green eyes. Red or purple eyes are much rarer, and only occur if there is no melanin at all. Such people most often have blue eyes, but in some individuals the thing which shows through is the blood vessels of the eye - hence the red colour.

Having one's eyes not the same colour is known as heterochromia, and is usually the result of damage to one or other eye.

s: H2G2

 
Gray
156161.  Tue Mar 13, 2007 11:29 am Reply with quote

Odd-eyed cats:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:June_odd-eyed-cat.jpg

Quote:
An odd-eyed cat is a cat with one blue eye and one green, orange or yellow eye. It is a feline form of heterochromia.[1][2] The condition most commonly affects white colored cats but can be found in a cat of any color, as long is it possesses the white spotting gene.[3]


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Odd-eyed_cat

 
Flash
156326.  Tue Mar 13, 2007 6:59 pm Reply with quote

If you're in a room with 10 people, 7 or 8 of them will be wearing glasses or contact lenses - more if you move in elderly circles. Is this a modern phenomenon, or has it always been the case that most people have poor sight? If so, what effect might this have had on history? Could it be that most of the participants in a medieval battle, for example, couldn't see their opponents until they were an axe-handle away? Might this explain why people have been willing to follow orders so readily? They just took their instructions from the only guy in the village who could see what the hell was going on?

 
Frederick The Monk
156356.  Wed Mar 14, 2007 4:02 am Reply with quote

The earliest depiction of spectacles comes from this image by Tommaso de Modena and dates from 1352.

 
Molly Cule
156375.  Wed Mar 14, 2007 5:26 am Reply with quote

In the mid-15th C the relative cost of custom made spectacles was less than it is today.

The historian Vincent Ilardi found correspondence dated October 21 1462 between Duke Sforza of Milan and his Ambassador to Florence, he ordered three dozen pairs of eyeglasses to be made to three sets of specifications. This was expected within a week. He paid an average cost of 6.8 soldi a pair. At the time the average wage was 17.2 Soldi so the glasses cost less than half an average daily wage. The average wage in the UK is £64 a day and the average cost of a pair of glasses is £148.50. According to the article below which argues that opticians are ripping people off.
http://money.uk.msn.com/investing/articles/nicklouth/article.aspx?cp-documentid=487701
Duke of Sforza info from a paper written at the University of Arizona

 
MatC
156376.  Wed Mar 14, 2007 5:36 am Reply with quote

Flash wrote:
If you're in a room with 10 people, 7 or 8 of them will be wearing glasses or contact lenses - more if you move in elderly circles. Is this a modern phenomenon, or has it always been the case that most people have poor sight? If so, what effect might this have had on history? Could it be that most of the participants in a medieval battle, for example, couldn't see their opponents until they were an axe-handle away? Might this explain why people have been willing to follow orders so readily? They just took their instructions from the only guy in the village who could see what the hell was going on?


Is that 7 or 8 an actual figure, Flash, or a guess? It sounds high, by my experience.

 
MatC
156378.  Wed Mar 14, 2007 5:42 am Reply with quote

Molly Cule wrote:
The average wage in the UK is £64 a day and the average cost of a pair of glasses is £148.50.


That seems terribly high for an average - some people must be spending thousands on their bins, to balance out what I pay! (But then, I suppose the whole idea of an average is by far the most useless concept anyone has ever come up with in the history of thought.)

Glasses are a lot cheaper now than they were 20-30 years ago, arenít they?

But Iím depressed to read how quickly they could get their prescriptions filled in those days!

 
eggshaped
156383.  Wed Mar 14, 2007 5:48 am Reply with quote

A quite often mentioned quote on spectacle websites comes from Roger Bacon's Opus Majus (1268).

Quote:

If anyone examine letters or other minute objects through the medium of crystal or glass or other transparent substance, if it be shaped like the lesser segment of a sphere, with the convex side toward the eye, he will see the letters far better and they will seem larger to him. For this reason such an instrument is useful to all persons and to those with weak eyes for they can see any letter, however small, if magnifier enough


Dunno if it's kosher, but it should be easy to find out.

 
eggshaped
156387.  Wed Mar 14, 2007 6:03 am Reply with quote

Link to that dude who wore upside-down glasses for a week only for his eyes to self-align.

Quote:

George Malcolm Stratton was a psychologist at the University of California who set out to learn what would happen if he went about his daily routine wearing glasses that reversed all images onto his retina.

At first he was wildly disorientated, but he persevered, and after eight days his eyes had adjusted to the change and his brain perceived the world as it had been before he donned the specs.

After the experiment, Stratton reported that the world never really felt normal while he was wearing the glasses, his body parts in particular feeling odd. On removing the glasses, it took a good few hours for everything to return to normal.


Bunter, you know what's a complete pain. When there's something which I know I posted, I search for a keyword and "eggshaped". Now that you've moved all my old dvd posts to another forum in posts with your name, I can't bloody find anything.

 
eggshaped
156411.  Wed Mar 14, 2007 7:03 am Reply with quote

Shakespeare apparently died of Mikulicz's syndrome or cancer of the tear-duct.

Professor Hildegard Hammerschmidt-Hummel, from the University of Mainz claims that she has found evidence of the disease in at least four contemporary portraits of Shakespeare.

Quote:

"At Shakespeare's time, the artists depicted their sitters realistically and accurately, absolutely true to life, including all visible signs of disease,"


However the claim may be a bit shakey:

Quote:

The National Portrait Gallery, which conducted a four-year study of possible surviving portraits for the exhibition Searching for Shakespeare, stresses that "today we have no certain lifetime portrait of England's most famous poet and playwright".



source

 
eggshaped
156523.  Wed Mar 14, 2007 12:00 pm Reply with quote

Here's a brilliant study about where people stare when looking at pictures/websites etc.

What do you think about this:

 
MatC
156525.  Wed Mar 14, 2007 12:02 pm Reply with quote

Great!

Mind you, you would stare at a rounders player who had a huge glowing foo fighter all over his crotch.

 
Molly Cule
156550.  Wed Mar 14, 2007 1:01 pm Reply with quote

That's cool if it's true, do you all of you lot look at at men's crotches? I certainly never do, thats as far as I can help with whether it is true or not. Acutally, I kind of do sometimes in real life but never at pics on the web.

 
Molly Cule
156551.  Wed Mar 14, 2007 1:02 pm Reply with quote

It says on a few websites that the Chinese used to wear dark glasses originally to ward off evil spirits, there is a good picture but I can never get the image thing to work.

http://tinyurl.com/32g57n

<Molly - I've replaced the long link with a tinyurl for you. Jenny>

 

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