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Extinction

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DELETED
158214.  Wed Mar 21, 2007 7:10 am Reply with quote

DELETED


Last edited by DELETED on Fri Mar 23, 2007 6:59 am; edited 1 time in total

 
Jenny
158267.  Wed Mar 21, 2007 9:07 am Reply with quote

Garrick, you should contribute that to Conservapedia, the American right-wing answer to the 'liberal bias' of Wikipedia, from which I extract this entry on the dodo:
Quote:


The dodo became extinct in the late 1600s, and environmentalists blame human activity for this extinction. Actually, numerous species have always gone extinct each decade with or without human activity to blame. But the dodo captured people's imagination as one of the first recorded extinctions. The environmentalists' theory is that humans helped drive the dodo to extinction by hunting and by bringing along rats and other animals to the island which damage the dodo habitat and stole dodo eggs.[1]. But evidence indicates that a natural disaster had already put the species into decline before the arrival of humans.[2]


The discussion pages on various entries on this site afford hours of harmless and occasionally scarey amusement. However, they routinely ban people who make edits that don't mesh with their world view, so if you decide to go and play there, be very subtle about it and have a proxy server lined up for when you get banned.

 
Flash
158274.  Wed Mar 21, 2007 9:23 am Reply with quote

Some people think the extinct Tasmanian Tiger is not only 'not a tiger' but also 'not extinct'. This article says why Dr Erwin Bulte of Tilburg University in the Netherlands thinks this, and why Dr Stephen Wroe, a palaeontologist at University of Sydney, thinks Dr Bulte is 'damned irresponsible' to say so.

http://www.abc.net.au/science/news/stories/s879154.htm

 
Frederick The Monk
158922.  Thu Mar 22, 2007 12:20 pm Reply with quote

If those naughty Americans and Russians had autoclaved the last two stocks of smallpox virus AS THEY PROMISED then it would have been the first deliberate extinction of a species by humans.

 
Flash
158935.  Thu Mar 22, 2007 12:47 pm Reply with quote

What about the Passenger Pigeons (see last series)?

 
Jenny
158946.  Thu Mar 22, 2007 1:02 pm Reply with quote

Was the complete eradication of Passenger Pigeons deliberate or accidental though?

 
Frederick The Monk
159087.  Fri Mar 23, 2007 4:52 am Reply with quote

I'm not sure someone set out to eat every single passenger pigeon with the intention of exterminating them - they just tasted nice

 
Flash
159089.  Fri Mar 23, 2007 4:56 am Reply with quote

Well, we stated that the people who shot the last flock did so in the knowledge that that was what they were doing. In a court of law that might well constitute mens rea, I would think.

 
DELETED
159101.  Fri Mar 23, 2007 5:22 am Reply with quote

DELETED

 
Gray
159109.  Fri Mar 23, 2007 5:35 am Reply with quote

Quote:
If those naughty Americans and Russians had autoclaved the last two stocks of smallpox virus AS THEY PROMISED then it would have been the first deliberate extinction of a species by humans.

Keep your enemies closer... There's still a lot we're learning from smallpox, particularly about how our own immune system works. Also, someone else may have a stash, and we'd need to make the vaccine, which you can only do from a 'live' culture.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/health/4568097.stm

On extinction, there's a great story (from Adams & Carwardine's Last Chance To See about a particular species of pigeon from somewhere in the pacific of which there was only a single male left, and a handful of females. The male wasn't interested in the females at all, so the whole thing looked doomed.

Until someone arrived at the conservation centre who happened to like wearing a bowler hat. The pigeon found this irresistibly erotic for some reason, and frotted itself off regularly on the rim, leaving behind the valuable sperm. It's how they managed to save the bird from extinction...

 
Flash
159153.  Fri Mar 23, 2007 6:53 am Reply with quote



Yes, we did. Or rather, the cat did, and we made jokes about it.

 
Jenny
159431.  Fri Mar 23, 2007 1:57 pm Reply with quote

From a thread about interesting plants on Quite Interestrings:

Quote:

Wood's Cycad

Encephalartos woodii is an extremely rare plant, one of the rarest in the world with no specimens left IN THE WILD (just to make that clear). This plant has only been once found in the wild and now the only known plants left are all male, this plant is on the verge of extinction. Of the 5 remaining specimens 4 have been confirmed as male but the plant in Dublin has yet to cone, however so to call them all male may (hopefully) prove to be inaccurate.

 
Jenny
159604.  Sat Mar 24, 2007 10:08 am Reply with quote

Grizzly put this on the news and it seemed relevant to this thread:

Quote:

Inextinct

The short-necked oil beetle has re-emerged in South Devon. The insect was believed to become extinct in the 1940's due to damage caused by intensive farming.

The beetle's larvae survives by hitching a ride on miner bees to the bee's nest and consuming the bee's eggs. The beetles were last seen in Sussex in 1948.

 
Jenny
160009.  Mon Mar 26, 2007 10:00 am Reply with quote

In this week's New Scientist:
Quote:

The best evidence for the continued existence of the ivory-billed woodpecker, believed extinct for decades until 'captured' on video two years ago, has been discredited. A video analysis of the common pileated woodpecker to be published in BMC Biology shows it has the colour, pattern and wingbeat frequency thought to be unique to the ivory-bill.

 
MatC
160028.  Mon Mar 26, 2007 11:03 am Reply with quote

So he's extinct again? Honestly, if it wasn't for bad luck, he wouldn't have no luck at all.

 

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