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Exhibitions

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Vitali
154678.  Wed Mar 07, 2007 4:22 pm Reply with quote

This closely relates to "eccentrics".
By "exhibitions" I primarily mean bizarre collections and museums, like Museum of Socks in Canada (allegedly, it has a pair of Napoleon's hopefully, properly washed), Museum of Worms in Victoria (Australia) - I've been there. Among other things, it offers visitors to look at the world "with the eyes of a worm". You can also travel through enlarged worm's intestines. Also in Canada (I think) there's a Museum of Lunchboxes.
There's a Museum of Toilets in Leicester.
Any more?

 
eggshaped
154680.  Wed Mar 07, 2007 4:30 pm Reply with quote

Quote:
Among other things, it offers visitors to look at the world "with the eyes of a worm".


Considering worms (earthworms at least) don't have eyes, this must be a pretty crappy exhibit.

 
suze
154682.  Wed Mar 07, 2007 4:30 pm Reply with quote

Have we ever done the Icelandic Phallological Museum at Husavík?

It contains 151 penises from 42 different kinds of mammal (rather a lot of whales), and they have a promise of a human one when its owner has no further use for it. And also "about one hundred artistic oddments and other practical utensils related to the museum's chosen theme".

http://www.phallus.is/

(Opens in Icelandic, but click on the hybrid American/British flag.)

 
Vitali
154707.  Wed Mar 07, 2007 5:58 pm Reply with quote

A gallery in Trier has a pair of Karl Marx's longjohns on display.

 
Flash
154719.  Wed Mar 07, 2007 6:45 pm Reply with quote

I saw St Francis' dressing-gown cord in a Cathedral once.

 
Frederick The Monk
154786.  Thu Mar 08, 2007 4:12 am Reply with quote

Let's not forget the splendidly odd Kuntskamera museum in St. Petersburg, which has Peter the Great's collection of extracted teeth among other treasures.

 
Frederick The Monk
154787.  Thu Mar 08, 2007 4:15 am Reply with quote

The 'Crystal Palace' housing the Great Exhibition came in on time and on budget - surely the last time this has happened for a public building project. It had also made a profit before the doors even opened thanks to advanced ticket sales.

Crystal Palace

 
eggshaped
154795.  Thu Mar 08, 2007 4:33 am Reply with quote

Crystal Palace was 1,851 feet long

 
Flash
154800.  Thu Mar 08, 2007 4:39 am Reply with quote

The Great Exhibition was seen by 6 million people, a quarter of the population of Britain, over 5 ˝ months. The building in Hyde Park covered 18 acres, enclosed oak and elm trees, and the foundations are still there. One concern was that the exhibits would be covered in droppings left by birds which had been built in to the structure, and which could not be shot for fear of breaking the glass (leading to Wellington's famous suggestion to Queen Victoria: "Sparrowhawks, ma'am"). The building was moved to house a permanent exhibition in Sydenham, which was a better site in that it had railway access, the lack of which had been a problem for Hyde Park. It burnt down in 1936; the fire could be seen as far away as Brighton.

For the exhibition the Germans sent machinery and the French sent erotic sculptures which had to be covered up. A dedicated police force 1000 strong was created; there was a fear in some quarters that the Exhbition would attract a lot of seditious elements. 1851 was coincidentally the first census in which the urban population out-numbered the rural. The South Ken Museums and the Royal Albert Hall were built with the profits, and scholarships are still being distributed. It is perhaps one of the few events in human history which can be celebrated without equivocation. On the Albert Memorial, Prince Albert is shown reading the Exhibition catalogue.

(In Our Time 27/4/06).

Might be one for the Victorian Special.

 
eggshaped
154805.  Thu Mar 08, 2007 4:51 am Reply with quote

I read "The World for a Shilling: How the Great Exhibition of 1851 Shaped a Nation" a couple of weeks ago, and to be quite honest there wasn't nearly as much interestingness in there as I'd hoped.

I wonder if the whole subject is a bit dull.

 
Flash
154822.  Thu Mar 08, 2007 5:25 am Reply with quote

That's never stopped us before.

 
eggshaped
154827.  Thu Mar 08, 2007 5:38 am Reply with quote

The name "Crystal Palace" was originally given to the structure by Punch magazine

 
Molly Cule
154831.  Thu Mar 08, 2007 5:41 am Reply with quote

The building was called The Crystal Palace by Punch magazine. Sydenham is in the area now known as Crystal Palace. Before it burnt down the Palace was surrounded by a great park which had the first model dinasaurs in England. FA cup finals used to be played in the park until 1914, when George V watched the game, the first time a reigning monarch had watched a football final.


Last edited by Molly Cule on Thu Mar 08, 2007 6:03 am; edited 1 time in total

 
MatC
154833.  Thu Mar 08, 2007 5:44 am Reply with quote

eggshaped wrote:
I read "The World for a Shilling: How the Great Exhibition of 1851 Shaped a Nation" a couple of weeks ago, and to be quite honest there wasn't nearly as much interestingness in there as I'd hoped.

I wonder if the whole subject is a bit dull.


I agree, Egg - I keep going back to reading up on the Exhibition, thinking there must be something there, and there never is. Which is astonishing. It’s a sort of black hole of anti-quinterestingness.

 
eggshaped
154834.  Thu Mar 08, 2007 5:52 am Reply with quote

There is a TV transmitter in Crystal Palace; it is known as London's Eiffel Tower. It is the second highest structure in London and transmits analogue telly to all you cockneys who don't have digital or satellite.

 

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