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Molly Cule
158695.  Thu Mar 22, 2007 8:12 am Reply with quote

Same goes, big nose!

 
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158696.  Thu Mar 22, 2007 8:13 am Reply with quote

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Flash
158731.  Thu Mar 22, 2007 8:56 am Reply with quote

Does that mean (serious question here) that if you see a child with hanging lobes and both his parents have attached lobes then it follows that at least one of them is not his biological parent?

Here's my logic:

Let hanging lobe allele be X
Let attached lobe allele be Y

Y is recessive, so XX, XY and YX all have hanging lobes. Only YY has attached lobes.

Therefore each of the parents must be YY

So the child must have got an X from somewhere other than his parents.

If true, I would think we could run that. Would cause some consternation in living rooms throughout the land, so we'd want to be sure we knew what we were talking about.

 
eggshaped
158746.  Thu Mar 22, 2007 9:13 am Reply with quote

I'm not sure that genetics is always as simple as the two allele model. But I'm sure someone else will know more than me, I'm looking at you Bob and Gray.

 
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158747.  Thu Mar 22, 2007 9:14 am Reply with quote

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Flash
158749.  Thu Mar 22, 2007 9:15 am Reply with quote

That's what I said: "Y is recessive, so XX, XY and YX all have hanging lobes. Only YY has attached lobes. "

 
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158752.  Thu Mar 22, 2007 9:18 am Reply with quote

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dr.bob
158759.  Thu Mar 22, 2007 9:35 am Reply with quote

Assuming that earlobes really are dictated by a simple genetic dominance relationship, then you could definitely run the "does this child belong to these parents" question. The important thing, I'd guess, is to make absolutely sure that earlobes are controlled by such a simple genetic process. If not, you might cause divorce proceedings up and down the and unintentionally.

One thing about the ears growing in old age:

Molly Cule wrote:
Quote:
It seems therefore that as we get older our ears get bigger


That's not, of course, proven by studying a snapshot of the population. It may be that older people have bigger ears because of different conditions/diet during their growing years than young people today. Or it may show that people with bigger ears are more likely to live longer, thus skewing the figures.

To prove that ears grow as you get older, you'd have to follow the same people over a number of years.

 
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158761.  Thu Mar 22, 2007 9:40 am Reply with quote

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Flash
158926.  Thu Mar 22, 2007 12:35 pm Reply with quote

Not sure this was clear from the foregoing, but the thing about how your earlobes can save money which would otherwise be wasted on paternity testing kits appears safe, thanks to the link that Garrick posted.

 
Jenny
158941.  Thu Mar 22, 2007 12:56 pm Reply with quote

Up to a point, Lord Copper... What if you had an child who was not the offspring of his putative father, but was the offspring of somebody else with a similar earlobe gene? The earlobes would be OK but the child would still be the cuckoo in the nest.

 
Gray
159094.  Fri Mar 23, 2007 5:11 am Reply with quote

Albeit a cuckoo with ears.

 
MatC
161162.  Thu Mar 29, 2007 9:56 am Reply with quote

Here’s a story about an animal that understands foreign languages ...

Quote:
Like human code-breakers intercepting secret messages, red-breasted nuthatches have evolved ways to extract hidden information about threats from predators from the seemingly indistinguishable alarm calls of other species. It is the first time such subtle eavesdropping has been observed in nature.

S:
www.newscientist.com/article/dn11409?DCMP=NLC-nletter&nsref=dn11409

 
Gray
161304.  Thu Mar 29, 2007 1:36 pm Reply with quote

Quote:
It is the first time such subtle eavesdropping has been observed in nature.

A few other other animals do it too - mostly monkeys (vervets and diana) and some birds.

Quote:
Scientists have discovered that birds are capable of recognising calls that other species use to warn each other about predators.


http://calvin.st-andrews.ac.uk/external_relations/news_article.cfm?reference=607

 
Molly Cule
161445.  Fri Mar 30, 2007 4:37 am Reply with quote



Voila a high speed Japanese train called Fastech which uses cat's ears that pop out as brakes.

 

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