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Vitali
153049.  Fri Mar 02, 2007 10:15 am Reply with quote

According to wiki, "ephemera refers to written and printed matter published with a short intended lifetime. In the world of collectors common types of ephemera include letters, advertising trade cards, cigarette cards, airsickness bags, posters, postcards, bookmarks, baseball cards, tickets, greeting cards, stock certificates, photographs and zines. Decks of the most-wanted Iraqi playing cards are recent example of ephemera because they will probably lose their original purpose and interest in a relatively short time. The word derives from the Greek meaning of things lasting no more than a day.

In the field of Library and information science the term ephemera is also used to describe the class of published single-sheet or single page documents which are meant to be thrown away after one use."

I find the Iraqi playing cards (with portraits of former Iraqi leaders, including Saddam and Chemical Ali) mention rather thought-provoking. As a collector, I would say that their "interest" (if not the "purpose") is going to grow with time. Like that of a currency no longer in circulation...
Any other examples of modern ephemera? A potentially quite interesting E-word, I would say...

 
Vitali
157044.  Fri Mar 16, 2007 6:12 am Reply with quote

From the Museum of newspaper flops in Antwerp (see "Exhibitions") to bizarre (brilliant?) newspaper headlines:

"Serial Killer's Brother Eaten by Peasants" (The Australian, 1995)
"Down Memory Lane: Teacher Throws Pupil Across Classroom" (Folkestone Herald, 2003). This paper also used to have a regular column "Dumped car of the Week" in 2002-03
"Drunken Elks Attack Nursing Home" (Guardian, 2006)

Any more?

 
Flash
157081.  Fri Mar 16, 2007 7:12 am Reply with quote

And of course there is the insect order Ephemeroptera, of which the best-known member is probably the mayfly, the "short-lived winged creatures". We have talked of a question like "how long does a mayfly live" with a forfeit for "one day" because they actually live for a year - it's just their adult life which is so ephemeral.

 
Frederick The Monk
157100.  Fri Mar 16, 2007 7:36 am Reply with quote

Anyone know of an animal with a shorter lifespan (in total) that gastrotrich, at an all-too-brief three days?

 
MatC
157105.  Fri Mar 16, 2007 7:54 am Reply with quote

In evolutionary terms, is having a short lifespan a sign of success? I mean, if it only takes three days to pass your DNA on, then are you “more efficient” than an elephant?

 
Frederick The Monk
157111.  Fri Mar 16, 2007 8:10 am Reply with quote

Good point. In and out nice and quick - DNA passed on, goodbye, thankyou.

 
Jenny
157154.  Fri Mar 16, 2007 11:45 am Reply with quote

Wham bam thank you ma'am?

 
MatC
158247.  Wed Mar 21, 2007 8:25 am Reply with quote

Vitali wrote:
From the Museum of newspaper flops in Antwerp (see "Exhibitions") to bizarre (brilliant?) newspaper headlines:

"Serial Killer's Brother Eaten by Peasants" (The Australian, 1995)
"Down Memory Lane: Teacher Throws Pupil Across Classroom" (Folkestone Herald, 2003). This paper also used to have a regular column "Dumped car of the Week" in 2002-03
"Drunken Elks Attack Nursing Home" (Guardian, 2006)

Any more?


I did a book of weird headlines (and associated ephemera) some years ago, and will be doing another later this year; so I can supply same to gentry, by the yard or as required.

 
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158248.  Wed Mar 21, 2007 8:29 am Reply with quote

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158250.  Wed Mar 21, 2007 8:32 am Reply with quote

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158252.  Wed Mar 21, 2007 8:36 am Reply with quote

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MatC
158706.  Thu Mar 22, 2007 8:28 am Reply with quote

“On the first Tuesday of June, ever since a benefaction in the late eighteenth century, a sermon is preached at the church of St Martin within Ludgate upon the theme that ‘Life is a bubble’.”
- London the biography by Peter Ackroyd.

 
Frederick The Monk
158870.  Thu Mar 22, 2007 11:29 am Reply with quote

MatC wrote:
“On the first Tuesday of June, ever since a benefaction in the late eighteenth century, a sermon is preached at the church of St Martin within Ludgate upon the theme that ‘Life is a bubble’.”
- London the biography by Peter Ackroyd.


Pah! I don't need a vicar to tell me that.

 
Gray
158879.  Thu Mar 22, 2007 11:46 am Reply with quote

Quote:
In evolutionary terms, is having a short lifespan a sign of success? I mean, if it only takes three days to pass your DNA on, then are you “more efficient” than an elephant?

The only sign of evolutionary success that really means anything concrete is digital: you're either extinct or you're not...

 
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159099.  Fri Mar 23, 2007 5:20 am Reply with quote

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