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Philippines

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dr.bob
153065.  Fri Mar 02, 2007 10:42 am Reply with quote

I found a few references to the Holy See, but I couldn't find anything definite. I decided not to mention it since I figured most of its permanent residents weren't really the marrying kind :)

 
Tas
153074.  Fri Mar 02, 2007 10:46 am Reply with quote

Why is the country The Phillipines, but natives of that country are Fillipino?

:-)

Tas

 
Vera C
629636.  Sun Oct 25, 2009 9:23 pm Reply with quote

Filipinos often kiss the hand of a senior member of the family or people of social standing. This custom, known as mano, is seen as a mark of respect. If you're a tourist in the Philippines, do not be surprised if Filipino children try to kiss your hand! This is also a way of showing respect to visitors.

And if you know a bit of Tagalog, do try and use it, even if it means mixing it with English. Mixing Tagalog and English is known as Taglish and is quite acceptable. It is even preferable to just speaking English. If you have a keen ear, you may also notice many Spanish words in the Tagalog vocabulary. (Indeed mano is the Spanish word for "hand".) This is hardly surprising, given that the Spanish occupied the Philippines for more than 300 years. Spanish, however, has not been used as an official language in the Philippines for over 100 years.

 
suze
629708.  Mon Oct 26, 2009 7:47 am Reply with quote

Although, isn't President Arroyo very keen to make Spanish once again a compulsory subject in school, which it has not been since the days of Marcos?

That's still a long ways from making it a third official language, but it's surely indicative of a move in that direction.

 
jan06n
636784.  Fri Nov 13, 2009 9:06 pm Reply with quote

Two official languages --- Filipino and English. Filipino which is based on Tagalog, is the national language. English is also widely used and is the medium of instruction in higher education.

Eight (8) major dialects spoken by majority of the Filipinos: Tagalog, Cebuano, Ilocano, Hiligaynon or Ilonggo, Bicol, Waray, Pampango, and Pangasinense.

Filipino is that native language which is used nationally as the language of communication among ethnic groups. Like any living language, Filipino is in a process of development through loans from Philippine languages and non-native languages for various situations, among speakers of different social backgrounds, and for topics for conversation and scholarly discourse. There are about 76 to 78 major language groups, with more than 500 dialects.

 
Zebra57
819033.  Wed May 25, 2011 2:42 am Reply with quote

Welcome bj31, while the Philippines is Christian it is not the only one in SE Asia. The other is East Timor.

 
gruff5
819061.  Wed May 25, 2011 5:17 am Reply with quote

Having visited the Philippines thrice in the past year, I can confirm their texting addiction. Sometimes it can be quite an exercise just walking from one end of the street to the other as you get bombarded with: "What r u doing now?" and "Where r U?" and "I'm in shopping mall here buying something for you" etc etc and having to duck out of the sun into shop doorways to check an impt text hasn't come in.

One very interesting fact I discovered about the Phils recently is that they are the second largest producer of geothermal electricity in the world after the USA. An impressive 27% of their total comes from this source (about 1% for the USA). In terms of geothermal electricity per capita population, they are second only to Iceland.

 
kannazuki
849494.  Fri Sep 23, 2011 2:44 pm Reply with quote

Tas wrote:
Why is the country The Phillipines, but natives of that country are Fillipino?

:-)

Tas


very late but I can answer this, The Philippines was named after King Philip II of Spain who was Felipe II in Spanish. The Philippines was originally "Las Islas Filipinas" and so anyone from there was a "Filipino".

Strangely, in Tagalog, Filipino is in fact "Pilipino" (both to refer to people and language). P and F are interchangeable sounds in the Tagalog dialect so I'm guessing it's also derived from the Spanish.

There is an old joke of dining at a restaurant in The Philippines and the local waiter comes to collect the plates and asks "Have you finish?" (cue immature giggling)

Here's another oddity from the Tagalog dialect - there's no actual difference between "he" and "she" in Tagalog because the third person pronoun is not gender specific ("siya"). People who learn Filipino first, then English often find it difficult to tell he/she apart in English and for those in the service industry (who have a manual for these things), often say "Hello Maam/Sir, welcome to McDonalds!" (yes, both "maam" and "sir" in the same line regardless of what gender you are)

I am Filipino and I can keep spouting these facts out for ages.

 
gruff5
849524.  Fri Sep 23, 2011 4:05 pm Reply with quote

ah, very interesting (VI), thank you, kannazuki. I did wonder about the 'F' in Filipino.

Keep spouting, as I'm going back there in a couple of weeks - Palawan.

They say that it helps to understand the country to remember that the Philippines spent 300 years in the convent and then 50 years in Hollywood.

Malta also introduced divorce recently. So, RP is the only proper country left without it.

 
kannazuki
849571.  Fri Sep 23, 2011 6:01 pm Reply with quote

gruff5 wrote:
ah, very interesting (VI), thank you, kannazuki. I did wonder about the 'F' in Filipino.

Keep spouting, as I'm going back there in a couple of weeks - Palawan.

They say that it helps to understand the country to remember that the Philippines spent 300 years in the convent and then 50 years in Hollywood.

Malta also introduced divorce recently. So, RP is the only proper country left without it.


Palawan is the "cradle of Philippine civilisation" because it is postulated that it used to be a land bridge with the rest of Asia and thus that is how people originally got to The Philippines. I think some of the oldest human settlements/remains were found there.

Speaking of marriage and whatnot, sex education isn't actually taught in school curriculums in The Philippines. The Church doesn't like it.

To say "Is this going down?" in Tagalog is "Bababa ba?" and to say "Going Down" is "Bababa."

The Archbishop of Manila used to be Cardinal Jaime Sin. Or Cardinal Sin for short. There used to be a popular phrase "Welcome to the House of Sin."

 
gruff5
849731.  Sat Sep 24, 2011 8:40 am Reply with quote

Tabon caves - maybe I will get there next time. Do you think there used to be Borneo-type big animals in Palawan? Tigers, rhinos etc

I want to say "Bababa ba"! Would asking about an elevator/lift or being in an airplane starting its descent make sense, as contexts? What about a computer going down? Would that work?

 
kannazuki
852231.  Sun Oct 02, 2011 7:12 pm Reply with quote

whoops forgot about this for a little bit, my bad!

Nope not that I can recall - mostly smaller animals like birds and monkeys and whatnot.

"Bababa ba" is more elevator/lift going down directionally, so yes this can be used to talk about airplanes as well but not about the metaphorical sense.

 
MinervaMoon
852242.  Sun Oct 02, 2011 8:54 pm Reply with quote

It can't be impossible to divorce in the Philippines; my grandparents did it. Perhaps only with annulment?

 
suze
852370.  Mon Oct 03, 2011 11:11 am Reply with quote

After a proposed law on the matter was passed in a referendum, Malta introduced divorce as from Saturday last. Its new law requires that a couple must have been living separately or apart* for four years before they may divorce.

This seems to mean that the Vatican City is by now the only country in the world where divorce is absolutely forbidden. As for the Philippines, Muslim Filipinos may divorce, but Catholic Filipinos ordinarily may not.

If one partner is non-Filipino, then a divorce obtained outwith the Philippines is valid (i.e. remarriage would not constitute bigamy). But if both partners are Filipino nationals, then a divorce obtained in this way is not valid, and remarriage of either partner would constitute bigamy.

So I suspect that what Minerva's grandparents actually did was to obtain an annulment. Filipino law allows annulment in the same limited circumstances as does the RC church (if one or other partner be already married, if the marriage be forced, or if the marriage be non-exclusive or not open to reproduction). But it also allows annulment if one partner is found to be "psychologically incapable of meeting the obligations of marriage", and there are quasi-legal practitioners who will - for a fee - advise you on just how to demonstate that to be the case.


* Yes, there is a difference between "separately" and "apart". Malta acknowledges that it is not always practical for a couple whose relationship is over to reside at different addresses. Accordingly, a couple who live under the same roof are regarded as "living separately" if they sleep in different beds.

 
gruff5
902277.  Tue Apr 17, 2012 6:14 am Reply with quote

MinervaMoon wrote:
It can't be impossible to divorce in the Philippines; my grandparents did it. Perhaps only with annulment?

Yes, it must have been annulment. Philippines is the only country in the world left (Malta recently gave in) where divorce remains unavailable. Couples with kids, who have been married for many years, can get an "annulment" if they have enough money and know the right lawyers. But the less well-off are stuck with each other. It's a non-sense!

I'm here in Palawan & the last couple of days have had chinook choppers flying around. Presumably it's the yanks warning off the chinks from the "South China Sea" - hope they succeed! There are about 7,000 US/Filipino troops doing joint exercises here.

 

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