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Philippines

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eggshaped
152182.  Wed Feb 28, 2007 4:16 am Reply with quote

The people of The Philippines are by far the largest users of text messages in the world.

In 2005, Filipinos sent an average of 250 million text messages a day. 70 per cent of mobile phone owners send around 10 messages a day; 14 per cent send between 10 and 20 messages a day.

 
dr.bob
152202.  Wed Feb 28, 2007 4:47 am Reply with quote

The Philippines is one of only two countries in the world where divorce is illegal (Malta being the other) so all marriages are for life (unless the marriage is annulled under extreme circumstances).

This used to be the situation in Chile until a few years ago.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/americas/4019955.stm

 
Izzardesque
152845.  Thu Mar 01, 2007 10:50 pm Reply with quote

eggshaped wrote:


In 2005, Filipinos sent an average of 250 million text messages a day.


When I first read that, I thought it sounded like they sent 250 million texts a day EACH. Was wondering what their phone bills looked like. Nevermind the size of their overdeveloped thumbs!

 
Mulvil
152922.  Fri Mar 02, 2007 7:23 am Reply with quote

dr.bob wrote:
The Philippines is one of only two countries in the world where divorce is illegal (Malta being the other) so all marriages are for life (unless the marriage is annulled under extreme circumstances).

This used to be the situation in Chile until a few years ago.


I see your Phillipines and Malta and consider raising you Andorra based on this although if someone could find another source I'd be more convinced

I would also imagine it to be illegal in the vatican.

 
suze
152946.  Fri Mar 02, 2007 7:58 am Reply with quote

I think I can rebut Andorra, based on this site which states:

"The Catholic Church has had to accept that the principality has created civil marriage and instituted divorce."

The same site notes that freedom of non-Catholic worship was only established in Andorra as late as 1993 - and it seems that the reforms of that year allowed divorce for the first time. (Four years before Ireland.)


The Philippines doesn't in general permit divorce, although Article 36 of the Family Code permits for voiding of marriage. They don't say so explicitly, but it's intended to be used if the man is impotent. All the same, there's something of a cottage industry in the Philippines based around showing that one partner is psychologically incapable of meeting the obligations of marriage - whatever that may mean. Furthermore, the Muslim Code of Personal Laws permits Muslims in the Philippines (about 5% of the population) to have talaq divorce.

http://www.international-divorce.com/d-philippines.htm


There is no divorce in Malta, but a divorce obtained abroad by a Maltese is valid insofar as remarriage is not considered to be bigamy.

http://ec.europa.eu/civiljustice/divorce/divorce_mlt_en.htm


I'll see your Vatican City though, Mulvil.

 
dr.bob
153065.  Fri Mar 02, 2007 10:42 am Reply with quote

I found a few references to the Holy See, but I couldn't find anything definite. I decided not to mention it since I figured most of its permanent residents weren't really the marrying kind :)

 
Tas
153074.  Fri Mar 02, 2007 10:46 am Reply with quote

Why is the country The Phillipines, but natives of that country are Fillipino?

:-)

Tas

 
Vera C
629636.  Sun Oct 25, 2009 9:23 pm Reply with quote

Filipinos often kiss the hand of a senior member of the family or people of social standing. This custom, known as mano, is seen as a mark of respect. If you're a tourist in the Philippines, do not be surprised if Filipino children try to kiss your hand! This is also a way of showing respect to visitors.

And if you know a bit of Tagalog, do try and use it, even if it means mixing it with English. Mixing Tagalog and English is known as Taglish and is quite acceptable. It is even preferable to just speaking English. If you have a keen ear, you may also notice many Spanish words in the Tagalog vocabulary. (Indeed mano is the Spanish word for "hand".) This is hardly surprising, given that the Spanish occupied the Philippines for more than 300 years. Spanish, however, has not been used as an official language in the Philippines for over 100 years.

 
suze
629708.  Mon Oct 26, 2009 7:47 am Reply with quote

Although, isn't President Arroyo very keen to make Spanish once again a compulsory subject in school, which it has not been since the days of Marcos?

That's still a long ways from making it a third official language, but it's surely indicative of a move in that direction.

 
jan06n
636784.  Fri Nov 13, 2009 9:06 pm Reply with quote

Two official languages --- Filipino and English. Filipino which is based on Tagalog, is the national language. English is also widely used and is the medium of instruction in higher education.

Eight (8) major dialects spoken by majority of the Filipinos: Tagalog, Cebuano, Ilocano, Hiligaynon or Ilonggo, Bicol, Waray, Pampango, and Pangasinense.

Filipino is that native language which is used nationally as the language of communication among ethnic groups. Like any living language, Filipino is in a process of development through loans from Philippine languages and non-native languages for various situations, among speakers of different social backgrounds, and for topics for conversation and scholarly discourse. There are about 76 to 78 major language groups, with more than 500 dialects.

 
Zebra57
819033.  Wed May 25, 2011 2:42 am Reply with quote

Welcome bj31, while the Philippines is Christian it is not the only one in SE Asia. The other is East Timor.

 
gruff5
819061.  Wed May 25, 2011 5:17 am Reply with quote

Having visited the Philippines thrice in the past year, I can confirm their texting addiction. Sometimes it can be quite an exercise just walking from one end of the street to the other as you get bombarded with: "What r u doing now?" and "Where r U?" and "I'm in shopping mall here buying something for you" etc etc and having to duck out of the sun into shop doorways to check an impt text hasn't come in.

One very interesting fact I discovered about the Phils recently is that they are the second largest producer of geothermal electricity in the world after the USA. An impressive 27% of their total comes from this source (about 1% for the USA). In terms of geothermal electricity per capita population, they are second only to Iceland.

 
kannazuki
849494.  Fri Sep 23, 2011 2:44 pm Reply with quote

Tas wrote:
Why is the country The Phillipines, but natives of that country are Fillipino?

:-)

Tas


very late but I can answer this, The Philippines was named after King Philip II of Spain who was Felipe II in Spanish. The Philippines was originally "Las Islas Filipinas" and so anyone from there was a "Filipino".

Strangely, in Tagalog, Filipino is in fact "Pilipino" (both to refer to people and language). P and F are interchangeable sounds in the Tagalog dialect so I'm guessing it's also derived from the Spanish.

There is an old joke of dining at a restaurant in The Philippines and the local waiter comes to collect the plates and asks "Have you finish?" (cue immature giggling)

Here's another oddity from the Tagalog dialect - there's no actual difference between "he" and "she" in Tagalog because the third person pronoun is not gender specific ("siya"). People who learn Filipino first, then English often find it difficult to tell he/she apart in English and for those in the service industry (who have a manual for these things), often say "Hello Maam/Sir, welcome to McDonalds!" (yes, both "maam" and "sir" in the same line regardless of what gender you are)

I am Filipino and I can keep spouting these facts out for ages.

 
gruff5
849524.  Fri Sep 23, 2011 4:05 pm Reply with quote

ah, very interesting (VI), thank you, kannazuki. I did wonder about the 'F' in Filipino.

Keep spouting, as I'm going back there in a couple of weeks - Palawan.

They say that it helps to understand the country to remember that the Philippines spent 300 years in the convent and then 50 years in Hollywood.

Malta also introduced divorce recently. So, RP is the only proper country left without it.

 
kannazuki
849571.  Fri Sep 23, 2011 6:01 pm Reply with quote

gruff5 wrote:
ah, very interesting (VI), thank you, kannazuki. I did wonder about the 'F' in Filipino.

Keep spouting, as I'm going back there in a couple of weeks - Palawan.

They say that it helps to understand the country to remember that the Philippines spent 300 years in the convent and then 50 years in Hollywood.

Malta also introduced divorce recently. So, RP is the only proper country left without it.


Palawan is the "cradle of Philippine civilisation" because it is postulated that it used to be a land bridge with the rest of Asia and thus that is how people originally got to The Philippines. I think some of the oldest human settlements/remains were found there.

Speaking of marriage and whatnot, sex education isn't actually taught in school curriculums in The Philippines. The Church doesn't like it.

To say "Is this going down?" in Tagalog is "Bababa ba?" and to say "Going Down" is "Bababa."

The Archbishop of Manila used to be Cardinal Jaime Sin. Or Cardinal Sin for short. There used to be a popular phrase "Welcome to the House of Sin."

 

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