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Elderliness

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MatC
149563.  Tue Feb 20, 2007 4:01 pm Reply with quote

Pope Agatho - or Pope St Agatho, to use his professional name - was elected pope in 678. At the time, he was more than 100 years old.

Until then, he’d been a Benedictine monk. He was a fairly active pope, by all accounts, until his death in 681.

Because he performed so many miracles during his papacy (putting on his shoes unaided?), he is known to history as Thaumaturgus, or Wonderworker.

S: www.newadvent.org/cathen/01204c.htm

 
Gaazy
149605.  Tue Feb 20, 2007 5:23 pm Reply with quote

I knew that the conductor Leopold Stokowski was offered a short-term contract with an orchestra when he was very old, and that he refused to sign unless it was for much longer, so I googled for the details.

Different sources have different stories:

Quote:
At 94, he signed a five years contract with Columbia Records.


Quote:
In 1976, he signed a recording contract with CBS Records that would have kept him active until he was 100 years old.


Quote:
In 1976, he signed a recording contract with RCA Victor that would have kept him active until he was 100 years old.


However, Time magazine in June, 1976, puts it this way:

Quote:
In June Stokowski signed a contract with Columbia to make four records a year until 1982, when he will be 100.


- which makes it a six-year contract (not the four or five suggested by the other sources) and not with RCA Victor or CBS Records.

 
Gray
153739.  Mon Mar 05, 2007 8:05 am Reply with quote

121-year old released rap album:

http://www.lubbockonline.com/news/080597/frances.htm

 
Vitali
154519.  Wed Mar 07, 2007 7:23 am Reply with quote

The was a news story severl days ago about a 100-year-old London car mechanic (still working) who tackled a group of young muggers and drove them away!

 
MatC
154533.  Wed Mar 07, 2007 7:47 am Reply with quote

Vitali wrote:
The was a news story severl days ago about a 100-year-old London car mechanic (still working) who tackled a group of young muggers and drove them away!


Yes, he puts his longevity down to plenty of smoking and drinking. (And working, but I prefer the first two).

 
Flash
154541.  Wed Mar 07, 2007 8:01 am Reply with quote

Journalists always ask centenarians the secret of their longevity, and they are always quoted as giving answers like in "You Are Old, Father William" - some arbitrary personal peccadillo such as smoking, not smoking, standing on their heads or whatever.

 
Vitali
155074.  Thu Mar 08, 2007 1:20 pm Reply with quote

A couple of little known facts about centenarians from Georgia (I mean the former Soviet Republic of Georgia, where Stalin was born).
The much-publicised longevity of Georgians - one of the great Soviet myths - was actually a scam explained by two factors
1. Stalin very much liked to hear that the people from his native land lived for such a long time, so the statistics were deliberately "adjusted" to please the dictator.
2. Georgians are very ingenious and resourceful. During World War II many Georgian males assumed their fathers' identity (and documents!) to avoid being drafted.

 
Flash
155082.  Thu Mar 08, 2007 1:48 pm Reply with quote

Vitali, heading off at a slight tangent, why did Lenin and Stalin use pseudonyms when in office? Was this a widespread practice? Do the names mean or imply something about them (eg the way the name 'Flash' implies that I expose myself in public places and then run away very fast indeed)?

 
eggshaped
155177.  Fri Mar 09, 2007 5:42 am Reply with quote

Vitali, I first came across the Georgian thing via an article by Zhores Medvedev. I think the article implied that this was just a theory, but I've been wanting to get a good handle on it for a while. Is the draft-dodging thing 100% kosher?

The only thing I wondered what why only the Caucasus should think of using their fathers' identities; were there not a lot of other outposts who might come up with the same scam?

I think the figures I read said something like 3% of the russian population lived in the area which provided 97% of the country's centenarians - so there's obviously something dodgy going on.

 
MatC
155178.  Fri Mar 09, 2007 5:43 am Reply with quote

It wasn’t only in office, Flash; most revolutionaries adopted false names (as pseudonyms and/or noms des guerre) when they started out (for security reasons, I suppose) and since these party names were how they were known to the party and public, I suppose it wouldn't have made any sense to change Trotsky back to Bronstein.

 
eggshaped
155206.  Fri Mar 09, 2007 6:18 am Reply with quote

There appears to be a bust of Lenin at the south pole of inaccessibilty in Antarctica.

Quote:

We reached the POI - the centre Antarctica - at 17.30 gmt on the 19th Jan. We had been awake for 36 hours and had kited for 25 of those hours to gain 249 km and reach our destination. When we were within 6km of the position signalled on the GPS we noticed a black dot on the horizon - as we got closer an outline of bust started to appear - we could not believe it as we were expecting at the very best a mound of snow from when Lenin was left there 48 years ago.

He is standing on a chimney of the old Soviet hut about 2 meters above the snow line - he is a shoulder bust of Lenin larger than life size. It is made of some plastic composite - he is totally frost free as if he was put there yesterday. It so so very surreal. We are all so exhausted that we have only just put up the tent with Lenin's stern gaze over us!


http://www.humanedgetech.com/expedition/n2i/index.php

 
Vitali
155272.  Fri Mar 09, 2007 8:01 am Reply with quote

In response to Flash. "Lenin" was his "revolutionary" pseudonym to commemorate the victims of the Lena River (in Siberia) Goldfield Mines massacre in the beginning of the 20th century. His real last name was "Ulianov" and he was half-Jewish (mother's maiden name was "Blank"), half-Mordovian (Mordva is a small Volga River area Asian nation).
A little known fact about Lenin. He was suffering from a serious speech defect: could not pronounce "R" and had to say "G" instead (burred?). So his famous statement of 1917 - for the English ear - would probably sound like: "Comgades! The ggeat ghevolution has happened! Hoogay!"

"Stal'" in Russian means "steel" - that explains Stalin's pseudonym. His name at birth was "Jugashvili" - a typically Georgian last name which would have sounded alien and hard-to-pronounce to many Russians.


Last edited by Vitali on Fri Mar 09, 2007 8:06 am; edited 2 times in total

 
Flash
155276.  Fri Mar 09, 2007 8:05 am Reply with quote

Thanks - so these were revolutionary aliases, as Mat says?

 
dr.bob
155305.  Fri Mar 09, 2007 8:56 am Reply with quote

Vitali wrote:
A little known fact about Lenin. He was suffering from a serious speech defect: could not pronounce "R" and had to say "G" instead (burred?). So his famous statement of 1917 - for the English ear - would probably sound like: "Comgades! The ggeat ghevolution has happened! Hoogay!"


He wasn't really a ventriloquist's dummy, was he?

Was someone working him from behind?

 
Flash
155312.  Fri Mar 09, 2007 9:11 am Reply with quote

A good gag if we have the ventriloquist Nina Conti on the show, though.

 

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