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Mr Grue
149243.  Tue Feb 20, 2007 6:58 am Reply with quote

Try measuring the circumference of a piece of dust with some string then...

 
Mulvil
149245.  Tue Feb 20, 2007 6:59 am Reply with quote

We are talking about a border, don't be ridiculous

 
Mr Grue
149247.  Tue Feb 20, 2007 7:07 am Reply with quote

I refer the honourable gentleman to my previous statement.

 
Hans Mof
149250.  Tue Feb 20, 2007 7:11 am Reply with quote

Aaaaand stop!

Here are the answers.


1. In which country was the German National Anthem written...
In the UK (Heligoland) and Austria the Holy Roman Empire (Austria)
1 point for Austria
1 point for Heligoland
full points for mentioning both UK and Austria

The melody was indeed written in Austria by Haydn. The text was written by Hoffman von Fallersleben in Heligoland which, as suze correctly pointed out, at that time formed part of the UK. Hoffmann wrote the lines with Haydn‘s music in mind.

and what is its opening line?

Einigkeit und Recht und Freiheit
Klaxon for Deutschland, Deutschland über alles

While the ‘Lied der Deutschen‘ starts with the line Deutschland, Deutschland über alles the German National Anthem consists of the third stanza only.


2. True or false? Germany is a land that starts with ‘D‘.

True!
Klaxon for false.

The Federal Republic of Germany only exists since 1949. Germany can refer to several political constructs since 843. D for Deutschland it is.


3. How many kilometres of border does Germany share with its neighbour Belgium?

214 kilometres

29 km of Belgium rails run through Germany. 29 km x 2 (borders left and right) added to 156 km of ‘conventional‘ border makes 214 km.
The Vennbahn (very good, ali!) is a rural railway running through German territory however, Belgium owns the railway track with the ground on which it is built, making enclaves out of the five pieces of land separated from the rest of Germany.

http://exclave.info/current/vennbahn/vennbahn_history.html


4. Germany‘s international telephone code is 49. Which other telephone code connects you with Germany?

41

Büsingen am Hochrhein is a German town of about 1,450 inhabitants entirely surrounded by the Swiss canton of Schaffhausens. Since the late 18th century the exclave has been separated from the rest of Germany. Owing to its unusual geographical location, it uses public services from both countries, including telephone services. To call a resident of Büsingen, one can use either a German number (with the prefix +49 7734) or a Swiss one (with the prefix +41 52).

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Büsingen

GDR‘s country calling code (37) was discontinued in April 1992.
030 is not an international code but Berlin‘s area code.

 
Hans Mof
149253.  Tue Feb 20, 2007 7:18 am Reply with quote

The scores so far:

Dr Hudebnik -19
96aelw -7
Mulvil -4
costean -3
Mr Grue 0
Spinoza 1
ali 5

and heading towards honourary German citzenship

suze 7

I'll post the next set of questions at 14:00 CET

 
Hans Mof
149288.  Tue Feb 20, 2007 8:02 am Reply with quote

And now for today‘s questions.

German language

The first two can be answered here on the board again.

1. Which word is the odd one out?

- boulevard
- okay
- ombudsman
- schadenfreude

2. Which of the following sentences is not German?

a. Daor löpt ´ne lùw.
b. Der Löw woar‘s der wo dort lang ging.
c. Es war der Löwe, der dort entlang ging.
d. Is dit leeu wat daar stap.
e. Der giang einen leo dara umbi.


Please answer the following question by PM (i.e. not here!)

3. Translate the following sentence into English:

Er fährt nach Hamburg.


Two klaxons are waiting to be triggered today.
Deadline tomorrow 13:00 CET. I‘ll post the answers, the scores and the next set of questions tomorrow at 14:00 CET.

Enjoy
Your Quizmeister

 
Lucwhostalking
149293.  Tue Feb 20, 2007 8:09 am Reply with quote

Is the answer to question 1 ombudsman, because it's the same in both english and german. And i have no idea about 2.....yet

 
96aelw
149295.  Tue Feb 20, 2007 8:13 am Reply with quote

Well, after a quick dictionary perusal, I'm still unsure about 1. Ombudsman is Swedish, scahdenfreude's German, Boulevard's French (though the French got it from German) and OK is uncertain. Odd one out, hmm. Let's say OK, and hope the Swedes nicked ombudsman from the Germans as well, making OK the only not-German-at-all one. Sounds thin, though.

 
Mr Grue
149315.  Tue Feb 20, 2007 8:49 am Reply with quote

1. Schadenfreude - no-one uses this word in Germany.

(It's also the only one that doesn't have an "o" in it!)

2. Is dit leeu wat daar stap

and 3 harum hum hum.

 
ali
149322.  Tue Feb 20, 2007 8:56 am Reply with quote

Well, ombudsman derives from the Old Norse (via Swedish)
Boulevard (in its present form) comes from French (though it started life as the German word 'Bollwerk' meaning a fortification.
The derivation of 'okay' is disputed (i.e. no-one really knows), but it is fairly certain that it doesn't come from German.
'Schadenfreude' is AFAIK purely German so:

I think it must be 'ombudsman', as the correct spelling in German is 'ombudsmann' <waits for klaxon>

 
Mr Grue
149326.  Tue Feb 20, 2007 9:00 am Reply with quote

ali wrote:
The derivation of 'okay' is disputed (i.e. no-one really knows),


Is the Orl korrect story not true? Dang!

 
samivel
149328.  Tue Feb 20, 2007 9:03 am Reply with quote

I'm going with the 'no O in schadenfreude' explanation as well.
Just from the look of them, I reckon d. is the sentence that isn't German, because it looks like Dutch. (Although a. doesn't look like German to me, either.)

BTW, that Büsingen am Hochrhein sounds like a QI kind of place.

 
Lucwhostalking
149342.  Tue Feb 20, 2007 9:18 am Reply with quote

I'm going to guess D for question 2, it just feels right y'know.

 
costean
149345.  Tue Feb 20, 2007 9:21 am Reply with quote

I would say ombudsman. The others derive from Old German. I think okay comes via Dutch.

And like Luc I will guess d for number 2 for the same reasons. It sounds a bit Dutch.

 
ali
149358.  Tue Feb 20, 2007 9:36 am Reply with quote

Q2

a is a Franconian dialect, more closely related to Dutch than German.
b is a Bavarian dialect
c is Hochdeutsch
d is Afrikaans
e is Old High German.

so: a and d are not German.

 

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