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Executions

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MatC
156060.  Tue Mar 13, 2007 7:44 am Reply with quote

That strikes me as a brilliant Gen Ig, suze!

 
Jenny
156258.  Tue Mar 13, 2007 2:53 pm Reply with quote

Has anybody else come across Dr Beaurieux's report on consciousness maintained in a head after being severed from the body by the guillotine? Macabre but fascinating.

I was trying to track down the story of Lavoisier's head blinking after his execution, but sadly it doesn't seem supportable with any real evidence. AFAIK this other one is the real deal though.

 
Flash
156268.  Tue Mar 13, 2007 3:31 pm Reply with quote

Yes, we ran this in the last series ('death'). Not sure it made the broadcast version, though, so maybe it's still fair game.

 
Frederick The Monk
156696.  Thu Mar 15, 2007 5:08 am Reply with quote

MatC wrote:
After Monmouth was beheaded for rebellion, it was discovered by the Keeper of the King’s Pictures that there was no official portrait of Monmouth. So, his head was sewn back onto his body, he was seated in a chair, and had his portrait done by the court painter Sir Geoffrey Kneller.

Allegedly.

Source: ‘Amazing Mistakes’ by Michael Johnstone (Capella, 2003).


The problem qwith this story is that there are lots of contemporary portraits of Monmouth including two by Lely and three by Kneller. Here's a list:

S. Cooper, drawing, c.1660, Royal Collection ·
N. Dixon, miniature, c.1663, Buccleuch estates, Selkirk, Scotland ·
P. Lely, oils, 1665–1675, Buccleuch estates, Selkirk, Scotland ·
P. Lely, oils, oval, 1665–1675, Buccleuch estates, Selkirk, Scotland ·
G. Kneller, oils, 1678, Buccleuch estates, Selkirk, Scotland ·
G. Kneller, oils, 1679, Buccleuch estates, Selkirk, Scotland · attrib.
G. Kneller, oils, 1680–89, Goodwood, West Sussex ·
W. Wissing, oils, 1680–89, Palace House, Hampshire; version, NPG ·
W. Wissing, oils, c.1683, Clarendon College; on loan to Palace of Westminster, London ·
R. Arondeaux, silver medal, Scot. NPG ·
C. Boit, watercolour on ivory, Scot. NPG ·
J. Huysmans, oils, Buccleuch estates, Selkirk, Scotland ·

 
Frederick The Monk
156697.  Thu Mar 15, 2007 5:11 am Reply with quote

Monmouth's execution is a great story however and there must be a good question in it. He was executed by the notorious Jack Ketch, probably the worst executioner in British history, who took five chops to sever his head.

Even then there were persistent rumours that Monmouth wasn't dead including a claim that he was the Man in the iron Mask. Another report from May 1686 claimed that Monmouth was alive and well and going ‘about in womans Cloaths in Bristoll and Summersettsheer’ (BL, Add. MS 41804, fol. 168).

 
eggshaped
156698.  Thu Mar 15, 2007 5:14 am Reply with quote

Fred, any truth that those about to be hanged at Tyburn would always stop off for a pint with their executioner on the way from (Newgate?) prison?

 
MatC
156706.  Thu Mar 15, 2007 5:38 am Reply with quote

Quote:
G. Kneller, oils, 1678, Buccleuch estates, Selkirk, Scotland ·
G. Kneller, oils, 1679, Buccleuch estates, Selkirk, Scotland · attrib.
G. Kneller, oils, 1680–89, Goodwood, West Sussex ·


That's odd in itself; why so many so close together, by the same geez? Was Kneller a paparazzo?


Last edited by MatC on Thu Mar 15, 2007 5:51 am; edited 1 time in total

 
Frederick The Monk
156712.  Thu Mar 15, 2007 5:43 am Reply with quote

It is odd isn't it. He was I suppose a bit of a pin-up boy at the time having defeated the French in the Low Countries and bopped the Scottish Covenanters on the head a few times. By this date is was also pretty clear that Charles II wouldn't have an heir and no-one fancied having the Duke of York much so I assume this is all aprt of a PR drive.


Last edited by Frederick The Monk on Thu Mar 15, 2007 6:00 am; edited 1 time in total

 
Flash
156715.  Thu Mar 15, 2007 5:49 am Reply with quote

Elvis also goes about in womans cloathes in Bristol - are they in any way related?

 
Frederick The Monk
156718.  Thu Mar 15, 2007 6:00 am Reply with quote

eggshaped wrote:
Fred, any truth that those about to be hanged at Tyburn would always stop off for a pint with their executioner on the way from (Newgate?) prison?


Hmmmmmm this is something that's bothered me before. I've certianly never come across a case of the condemned stopping off for a pint recorded in the Newgate Calendars. There's a whiff of the romantic highwayman (whatever they smell like) about the story if you ask me. Personally if I were the jailer I wouldn't allow it - most execution crowds were rowdy and very often on the side of the prisoner so there's a good chance any stop off would lead to an escape bid. Having said that the condemned almost cetainly had quite a few beers before setting off (provided someone would buy them) and might be offered a pint on the gallows by a generous member of the audience.

 
MatC
165168.  Thu Apr 12, 2007 6:49 am Reply with quote

After the Gordon Riots in 1780, 25 protestors were sentenced to hang. One of them was, as luck would have it ... a public hangman. Edward Dennis was granted a pardon “in order that he may hang his brother rioters.”

S: Characters of Fitzrovia by Pentelow and Rowe (Pimlico, 2002).

 
Gray
165180.  Thu Apr 12, 2007 7:00 am Reply with quote

Quote:
Elvis also goes about in womans cloathes in Bristol

You never seen me and a transvestite Elvis in the same room together... right?

 
MatC
165216.  Thu Apr 12, 2007 7:36 am Reply with quote

The Cato Street conspirators, executed in 1820, died with some dignity. Thomas Brunt spurned the blindfold, took a pinch of snuff and said some fine words about liberty. James Ings, according to a contemporary account, was “perhaps too obstreperous in singing ‘Death or Liberty,’ and Thistlewood [Arthur, one of his co-condemned] said ‘Be quiet, Ings; we can die without all this noise.’”

That’s what I call laid-back last words.

S: Characters of Fitzrovia by Pentelow and Rowe (Pimlico, 2002).

 
eggshaped
171069.  Tue May 01, 2007 2:29 am Reply with quote

This is the guy who I mentioned at the meeting. I claimed that he deliberately put on weight to avoid the gallows. It is certainly true that he was deemed too heavy to hang, and that he put on a lot of weight (around 100 lbs) between his arrest and his date of hanging; however the article claims that it was due to a medical condition, not due to deliberate overeating.

I claimed something else at the meeting which I was going to check. Can anyone else remember what it was, so I can shoot that fox also?

 
Flash
171071.  Tue May 01, 2007 2:37 am Reply with quote

I'll send you the minute in a minute, but maybe it was the hieroglyphics.

 

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