View previous topic | View next topic

Education

Page 1 of 1

MatC
145891.  Mon Feb 12, 2007 7:49 am Reply with quote

The police forces have the highest proportion of graduates of any UK employer(s).

Can this be true? Compared to, for instance, universities? If so, I feel it has GenIg possibilities.

S: My only source for this at the mo is a novel - in which it was clear from context that the author thought it to be true - but I daresay I could find a better source, if it was thought of interest.

 
MatC
149485.  Tue Feb 20, 2007 12:15 pm Reply with quote

Cuba has the most teachers per capita in the world - one to every 37 inhabitants.

S: Morning Star, 6 June 06.

 
Vitali
149532.  Tue Feb 20, 2007 2:22 pm Reply with quote

So had the USSR where teachers were among the three lowest paid professions (alongside doctors and lawyers - I am serious!). A teacher's salary would be about three times lower than that of a bus driver. To keep educated classes (the so-called "intelligentsia") underpaid and hence easier to control was one of the main principles of Lenin/Stalin. Looks like Castro has learned a lot from them.

 
Bunter
149540.  Tue Feb 20, 2007 2:39 pm Reply with quote

Quote:
In USSR where teachers were among the three lowest paid professions (alongside doctors and lawyers


This is QI in itself. What was the best paid job? Bankers?

 
MatC
149559.  Tue Feb 20, 2007 3:29 pm Reply with quote

Vitali wrote:
So had the USSR where teachers were among the three lowest paid professions (alongside doctors and lawyers - I am serious!). A teacher's salary would be about three times lower than that of a bus driver. To keep educated classes (the so-called "intelligentsia") underpaid and hence easier to control was one of the main principles of Lenin/Stalin. Looks like Castro has learned a lot from them.


Or, to put it another way, Cuba prioritises education and health care, while capitalist countries prioritise profit-making professions such as "media" and finance.

 
Bunter
149633.  Tue Feb 20, 2007 6:11 pm Reply with quote

Quote:
capitalist countries prioritise profit-making professions such as "media


Far from it. Most journos are paid nothing and are reviled by everyone despite the fact they provide the only checks and balances to rampaging ego driven governments.

 
Flash
149652.  Tue Feb 20, 2007 7:20 pm Reply with quote

Oh good, a bit of radical polemic for a change. Much as my instinct prompts me to side with Mat on this one, I don't follow his argument in this case. Vitali's post, put either another way or the original way, seems to say only that Cuba and the USSR value(d) buses above education, healthcare and the Rule of Law. I mean, maybe Cuba does

Quote:
prioritise... education and health care, while capitalist countries prioritise profit-making professions such as "media" and finance


for all I know, but that isn't a conclusion one could draw from Vitali's post, as far as I can see.

 
dr.bob
149725.  Wed Feb 21, 2007 5:03 am Reply with quote

Lots of education statistics around the world here:

http://www.nationmaster.com/cat/edu-education

I couldn't find figures for salaries (at least for Cuba), but Cuba does come top of the list of education spending as a percentage of GDP with a whopping 18.7% of their GDP spent on education. Second is Vanuatu with a mere 11%. The US is 39th with 5.7%, the UK is 47th with 5.3%, and Russia is way down in 89th with only 3.8% of GDP spent on education.

Some other interesting stats come out of that website. One that caught my eye was Library Books Per Capita. As you would expect, the top 5 are dominated by tiny countries with small populations which can easily skew the statistics:

Position : Country : Library books per capita : Population
5th : Iceland : 2.83 : 307,261
4th : San Marino : 3.70 : 28,117
3rd : Liechtenstein : 4.97 : 33,987
2nd : Monaco : 9.78 : 35,657

However, the runaway winner is not a small country at all. With a population of 4,661,473 people, Georgia is the library capital of the world with a massive 16.34 library books for every person living there.

Of course, it doesn't specify if that's 16.34 different books :)

 
MatC
149738.  Wed Feb 21, 2007 5:26 am Reply with quote

Bunter wrote:
Quote:
capitalist countries prioritise profit-making professions such as "media


Far from it. Most journos are paid nothing and are reviled by everyone despite the fact they provide the only checks and balances to rampaging ego driven governments.


No, no, Bunt ... it's not the employees who make the profit! It's ... I really ought to get on with some of the work that QI's actually paying me for, so I'll just say: google "surplus value."

 
Vitali
149801.  Wed Feb 21, 2007 7:59 am Reply with quote

Dear MatC, you can't be serious. There was no priority to either health or education in the USSR. In reality (because the doctors were so grossly underpaid), it was impossible to get a decent treatment without a bribe - and everyone knew that (true, you could have been sucessfully "treated" to death for free. A popular Soviet joke: a doctors' consilium discussing a patient's case. Chief physician takes the floor and says: "So, esteemed colleagues, shall we treat this patient or shall we let him live?").
Another QI detail: The Oath of the Student of Medicine (future doctor) started with: "I solemnly promise to study diligently the theory of Marxism/Leninism and the History of the Communist Party" - that was the 1st point. The second one was "I promise to study medical science" (heard it myself a number of times). The priorities are quite clear, aren't they? The quality of education as such was apalling, and the sheer number (world's highest) of doctors and teachers (just like in Cuba, I assume) was but another classic instance of window-dressing - one area where totalitarian systems have always excelled.

 
Flash
149891.  Wed Feb 21, 2007 10:03 am Reply with quote

Link to the Oath of Lasagna, the modern Hippocratic Oath which we discussed otherwhere - good for the notes, anyhoo.

 
MatC
152254.  Wed Feb 28, 2007 7:39 am Reply with quote

Workers in Havana cigar factories employ readers - called lectors - to read to them while they work.

In the late 19th and early 20th centuries the tobacco workers of Havana were the most organised and militant in the country, strongly influenced by anarchist and syndicalist ideas. (In 1902 they organised Cuba’s first general strike, which was only broken by the threat of US military intervention).

There was a hunger for self-education amongst the cigar rollers, and they began the practice of paying for lectors out of their own money, to read to them from newspapers, magazines, novels and non-fiction. This wasn't too popular with the employers, who wondered what sort of uppity ideas their employees might be taking in, but the cigar workers were too militantly unionised for the bosses to be able to put a stop to it.

(Some sources, by contrast, suggest that the famous cigar manufacturer Don Jaime Partagas Ravelo hired the first ever lector, to keep his employees entertained while they worked.)

One of the best known and most prized brands of Cuban cigar is the Montecristo. It’s named for Dumas’s character the Count of Monte Cristo, as that was the most popular choice of lector reading amongst the workers in the factory that made the cigar.

The position of lector was well-paid and of high status. Since the lector was paid by the staff, not the company, the really popular ones were in very high demand. They would sit in chairs elevated above the factory floor, so that everyone could hear them. Traditionally, the day began with readings from local and international newspapers, with some fiction or philosophy later on. The book was chosen by workers’ votes. Many or most of the workers were probably illiterate, but thanks to the lector system they were intimate with the works of Shakespeare, Voltaire, Zola and Dumas.

Today, the tradition still continues. More than 200 people, mostly women, are employed at the Real Fabrica de Tabacos Partagas cigar factory.

“They work from 7 a.m. to 5 p.m., with a two hour lunch break. Every morning, they listen to a reader go through the day's news reports. In the afternoon, excerpts from novels are read to them. Radio music fills the rest of the day, while Cuban musical groups perform at the factory every Thursday.”

I’ve been unable to find mention of lectors in any other trade; but is it possible that such an idea only ever arose in one place and profession? I suppose a later equivalent was the radio, with programmes like Workers’ Playtime; some large firms in Britain used to have their own in-house radio stations, in the middle of the last century.

Sources:
www.cubancigaronline.com/Partagas.htm
www.habanos.com/6festivaldossier_marcas.asp?i=ing
www.kwabs.com/artman/publish/article_1418.shtml
www.historical-museum.org/history/tobacco/tobacco.htm

Links: Employment; Entertainment.

 
MatC
186192.  Thu Jun 28, 2007 3:22 pm Reply with quote

Vitali wrote:
Dear MatC, you can't be serious. There was no priority to either health or education in the USSR. In reality (because the doctors were so grossly underpaid), it was impossible to get a decent treatment without a bribe - and everyone knew that (true, you could have been sucessfully "treated" to death for free. A popular Soviet joke: a doctors' consilium discussing a patient's case. Chief physician takes the floor and says: "So, esteemed colleagues, shall we treat this patient or shall we let him live?").
Another QI detail: The Oath of the Student of Medicine (future doctor) started with: "I solemnly promise to study diligently the theory of Marxism/Leninism and the History of the Communist Party" - that was the 1st point. The second one was "I promise to study medical science" (heard it myself a number of times). The priorities are quite clear, aren't they? The quality of education as such was apalling, and the sheer number (world's highest) of doctors and teachers (just like in Cuba, I assume) was but another classic instance of window-dressing - one area where totalitarian systems have always excelled.


I haven't the faintest fucking idea what you're talking about - but luckily, neither have you. I'll just point out that Cuba's medical system is universally recognised as the most advanced in the world - that Cuba sends more doctors and nurses to other countries than any other country on earth, and trains more foreign doctors and nurses and other medical professionals than ditto, and leave anyone interested to google for details.

 
MatC
195977.  Mon Jul 30, 2007 3:44 am Reply with quote

For instance ...

Quote:
CUBA-TRAINED DOCTORS GRADUATE
BBC News 24 Report, 24 July 2007 (watch the report via link below)

Eight US students have graduated from a Cuban medical school after completing a six-year study programme funded by the country's communist government.

The eight came to Cuba as part of a deal agreed between President Fidel Castro and members of Washington's Congressional Black Caucus.

Under the plan, Cuba offers students from deprived backgrounds full scholarships, including accommodation.

Watch the interviews with the US students in Havana here:
http://news.bbc.co.uk/player/nol/newsid_6910000/newsid_6914900/6914990.stm?bw=bb&mp=wm&asb=1&news=1

Read the report in full here:
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/americas/6914265.stm

 
MatC
215870.  Tue Oct 02, 2007 8:57 am Reply with quote

Quote:
Cubans treat man who killed Che


Cuban doctors working in Bolivia have saved the sight of the man who executed revolutionary leader Che Guevara in 1967, Cuban official media report.
Mario Teran, a Bolivian army sergeant, shot dead Che Guevara after he was captured in Bolivia's eastern lowlands.

Cuban media reported news of the surgery ahead of the 40th anniversary of Che's death on 9 October.

Mr Teran had cataracts removed under a Cuban programme to offer free eye treatment across Latin America.


http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/americas/7023706.stm

 

Page 1 of 1

All times are GMT - 5 Hours


Display posts from previous:   

Search Search Forums

Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2002 phpBB Group