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Names for things you didnt realise had names.............

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suze
1282817.  Mon Apr 30, 2018 11:45 am Reply with quote

Yes, that appears to be correct.

Other bespoke tailors are available, but here is one such firm stating that "The melton is the piece of felt that is underneath the collar of your jacket".

I'm wondering whether this should really be Melton as a proper noun. The OED is unaware of this name as a part of a suit jacket, but it does know that Melton is a fabric from which Melton jackets - black coats worn for hunting - were made. It is named for Melton Mowbray, very much hunting country, where the fabric and the coats were made. Some connexion, possibly?

Meanwhile, I seem to have learned something from this. Show jumping isn't as high profile of a sport as it was in my childhood, but you'll be aware that show jumpers traditionally wore either a red jacket or a black jacket.

The red jacket is a descendant of the hunting pink, which is bright red. It has long been supposed that it's called pink because the original hunting pinks were made by a Mr Pink (probably in Melton Mowbray, indeed), but this is now believed to be apocryphal. Instead, we are now asked to believe either that pink is the posh word for bright red, or (and rather more plausibly) that a bright red jacket may fade to pink if worn to the hunt on a filthy day such as today.

Show jumping being the sort of sport that it is, there were Rules about who could wear a red jacket. Only gentlemen could wear red, and even then only if either they had represented their country or they were a Master of Foxhounds. Ladies, and the uncapped who didn't shake hands in a funny way, had to wear black.

If the red showjumping jacket is a descendant of the hunting pink, is the black one a descendant of the Melton jacket?

 
artymcclench
1287582.  Thu Jun 21, 2018 7:13 pm Reply with quote

Quote:
Melton is a fabric from which Melton jackets - black coats worn for hunting - were made. It is named for Melton Mowbray, very much hunting country, where the fabric and the coats were made


The well fulled, twill scarlet cloth used for British army officers' tunics, referred to as Melton, was made in Stroud (Glos) home of 'Stroudwater scarlet.'
.

 
DVD Smith
1287592.  Fri Jun 22, 2018 4:33 am Reply with quote

Courtesy of this week's House of Games - the "glabella" is the bit of skin in between a person's eyebrows.

 
Gabby Lister
1287809.  Sun Jun 24, 2018 2:41 pm Reply with quote

Lumpo31 wrote:
Helios wrote:
You mean it isn't??


That's what I thought it was for.

What's it for otherwise??

Lisa

I know Im 11 years late but this is cool anyway, apparently the Philtrum is where the three main sections of your face came together as it was developing in the womb.
http://www.iflscience.com/health-and-medicine/why-do-we-have-little-groove-under-our-nose/

 
AlmondFacialBar
1287820.  Sun Jun 24, 2018 4:55 pm Reply with quote

That's also why it's not a totally unheard of facial malformation to have two noses with one nostril each. In that case the puzzle didn't fuse properly.

:-)

AlmondFacialBar

 
crissdee
1287836.  Mon Jun 25, 2018 4:04 am Reply with quote

Kind of the opposite of a "Daniella Westbrook/Rick Parfitt".

 
duglasbell@hotmail.co.uk
1289554.  Mon Jul 09, 2018 3:10 pm Reply with quote

Oolon Colluphid wrote:
This one has been annoying me for some time, and if anyone is going to know the answer, they will surely be on the QI website.

Is there a word that means something that is simultaneously a compliment and an insult? If so, what is it?

(Example: "you're the nicest ugly b*****d I know")

Also, the thread title requires an apostrophe.



The term 'son of a bitch' can be used, in the USA of course, as both an insult and an expression of admiration.

 
DVD Smith
1291647.  Wed Aug 01, 2018 6:21 am Reply with quote

The division symbol () is known as an obelus.

The forward slash ( / ) is known as a solidus.

The paragraph indicator in Microsoft Word () is known as a pilcrow.

 
GuyBarry
1291650.  Wed Aug 01, 2018 6:32 am Reply with quote

I had always understood "obelus" to refer to the dagger symbol (), but it seems that the symbol originated as a variant of the division sign (see dagger (typography)).

 
AlmondFacialBar
1291651.  Wed Aug 01, 2018 6:54 am Reply with quote

suze wrote:
Show jumping being the sort of sport that it is, there were Rules about who could wear a red jacket. Only gentlemen could wear red, and even then only if either they had represented their country or they were a Master of Foxhounds. Ladies, and the uncapped who didn't shake hands in a funny way, had to wear black.


Not were, are. While it's allowed nowadays to wear discreet shades of blue, green, or brown below Grand Prix level competitions, it's still strictly gentlemen red, ladies black at Grand Prix level and in international competition. The only exception is given for members of the police and armed forces or employees of state studs, who start in uniform.

My enthusiasm for jumping as a small-ish kid rapidly went south when I realised that I'd never get to wear one of these snazzy red jackets...

:-)

AlmondFacialBar


Last edited by AlmondFacialBar on Thu Aug 02, 2018 7:48 am; edited 1 time in total

 
DVD Smith
1291732.  Thu Aug 02, 2018 7:41 am Reply with quote

The metal plate surrounding a keyhole is known as an escutcheon.

 
crissdee
1291754.  Thu Aug 02, 2018 1:29 pm Reply with quote

Having fitted about three hundred and eleventy six of them in my time, I was aware of that factoid.

 
DVD Smith
1292678.  Mon Aug 13, 2018 5:00 am Reply with quote

The little bits of skin that stick out on the sides of your fingernails are known as hangnails.

 
AlmondFacialBar
1292683.  Mon Aug 13, 2018 5:29 am Reply with quote

Addendum about the international competition - during the non-Grand Prix competitions on Saturday at the Dublin Horse Show a female competitor was observed to wear a red jacket. Hence I guess it's only Grand Prix level now where it's still not allowed.

:-)

AlmondFacialBar

 
duglasbell@hotmail.co.uk
1387406.  Thu Aug 12, 2021 2:07 pm Reply with quote

DVD Smith wrote:
The little bits of skin that stick out on the sides of your fingernails are known as hangnails.


They were known as lazybacks in my family, and fingers whose nails had been bitten to the quick were known as drumsticks.

 

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