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Name an unusual War

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PDR
277675.  Fri Feb 15, 2008 6:04 am Reply with quote

RICKY66 wrote:

The Falkland War
Casualties and losses

Argentina

649 killed
1,068 wounded
11,313 taken prisoner
75 fixed-wing aircraft
25 helicopters
1 light cruiser
1 submarine
4 cargo vessels
2 patrol boats
1 spy trawler

United Kingdom

258 killed
777 wounded
115 taken prisoner
6 Sea Harriers
4 Harrier GR.3
24 helicopters
2 destroyers
2 frigates
1 LSL landing ship
1 LCU amphibious craft
1 containership
4 ships withdrawn


Points of order:

1. The Belgrano was a Heavy Cruiser rathere than a Light Cruiser.

2. Only two of the Sea Harriers were lost to enemy action (groundfire - none were lost in air-air engagements)

Quote:

More UK veterans of the Falklands War have killed themselves in the years since the 1982 conflict ended than died during hostilities, according to The South Atlantic Medal Association. And the suicide toll is greater than 255. The association estimates the total could be as high as 264 probably due to Post Traumatic Stress Disorder


I believe this is also true of the US forces in Vietnam.

PDR

 
RICKY66
277684.  Fri Feb 15, 2008 6:15 am Reply with quote

Quote:
I believe this is also true of the US forces in Vietnam.


Probably worse for them, they were treated like criminals towards the end of that conflict when they returned home!
And the sad fact is it the suicide of veterans will start happening again after the lattest conflicts in the Middle East are over! (If they ever end).

 
RICKY66
277694.  Fri Feb 15, 2008 6:27 am Reply with quote

The General Belgrano was originally the USS Phoenix (CL-46), a Brooklyn-class light cruiser.
Did it change it's status to Heavy cruiser in the Argentine Navy as a result of refits over the years?


Last edited by RICKY66 on Fri Feb 15, 2008 6:47 pm; edited 1 time in total

 
mikeyfone
277706.  Fri Feb 15, 2008 6:39 am Reply with quote

RICKY66 wrote:
The Phoney War.
Name given to the relatively inactive phase of World War 2 between the fall of Poland in Sept 1939 and the German invasion of Norway in April 1940.
It was far from Phoney if you served at sea:

September 3, 1939 U.30 sinks the SS Athenia:112 died.

September 17, 1939 U.29 sinks the Royal Navy aircraft carrier HMS Courageous: 518 died.

October 14, 1939 U.47 sinks HMS Royal Oak: 833 died.

November 23, 1939 Scharnhorst sinks the British armed merchant vessel Rawalpindi: 283 died.

Between Sept 3 1939 to April 1940 Allied ships lost 310

Not really a 'Phoney War' then!


There's a brilliant scene in the film 'Dunkirk' (starring Richard Attenborough and John Mills), where Richard Attenborough's character, a civilian with a reserved occupation, is complaining about the lack of beer due to the 'Phoney War'. A sailor confronts him, showing him his fingerless hand, and telling him of his days in a lifeboat in the Atlantic.

Fantastic film, btw.

 
mikeyfone
277719.  Fri Feb 15, 2008 6:56 am Reply with quote

The War of the Cakes

1838 conflict between France and Mexico over French compensation for business losses during the recent rebellions. One claim was for French pastries stolen from a restaurant by Santa Anna's troops.

The War of Jenkin's Ear

Named after the detached appendage of British sea captain Robert Jenkins, who claimed that Spanish coastguards cut of his ear in 1731. Public exhibition of said appendage inflamed public opinion, and war was declared in 1739. Took a while, though.

Chaco War

Fought between Bolivia and Paraguay in 1932. Sparked, in part, by Bolivia issuing a postage stamp which incorporated the disputed region of Gran Chaco into Bolivia. Paraguay issued a bigger stamp, showing Chaco with their borders.

The Pig War of 1860

Short lived confrontation in 1860. strangely enough. Only one casualty, the offending pig. A Canadian pig repeatedly crossed the border to eat American potatoes, and was therefore shot by an American farmer.
In response, a British warship was dispatched, though a stand off with sixty US soldiers did not result in bloodshed as both commanders agreed to stand down.

The War of the Brown Bull

Irish legend. Queen Medb [sic] of Connaucht was jealous of her husband's great bull Finnbhennach, so she led armies from four provinces to capture the bull Donn from an Ulster chieftain.

Source: 'Essential Militaria' by Nicholas Hobbes. Quite a good little book, fantastic gift or stocking filler.

 
Prof Wind Up Merchant
277954.  Fri Feb 15, 2008 1:45 pm Reply with quote

Helios wrote:
Personally, I've always liked thumb wars...


Damn I was going to suggest that.

 
RICKY66
278051.  Fri Feb 15, 2008 6:06 pm Reply with quote

Quote:
There's a brilliant scene in the film 'Dunkirk' (starring Richard Attenborough and John Mills), where Richard Attenborough's character, a civilian with a reserved occupation, is complaining about the lack of beer due to the 'Phoney War'. A sailor confronts him, showing him his fingerless hand, and telling him of his days in a lifeboat in the Atlantic.

Fantastic film, btw.


A classic film. Thats what made me think of looking up that period of the war to see what the losses were!
And the list wasn't including any other nations losses!

 
Sadurian Mike
278059.  Fri Feb 15, 2008 6:13 pm Reply with quote

RICKY66 wrote:
Quote:
There's a brilliant scene in the film 'Dunkirk' (starring Richard Attenborough and John Mills), where Richard Attenborough's character, a civilian with a reserved occupation, is complaining about the lack of beer due to the 'Phoney War'. A sailor confronts him, showing him his fingerless hand, and telling him of his days in a lifeboat in the Atlantic.

Fantastic film, btw.


A classic film. Thats what made me think of looking up that period of the war to see what the losses were!
And the list wasn't including any other nations losses!

Not mention the RAF losses while they dropped propaganda leaflets, mined German harbours, and flew reconaissance.

Dunkirk was a good film. I like the older films about WW2 because it was still real enough to lend an edge to the acting and script, something the later (especially Hollywood) films lost in their quest for blood, guts and drama. It also had authentic equipment for the Allies, though the German gear was almost exclusively US with large Balkan crosses slapped on the sides.

 
Leith
279465.  Sun Feb 17, 2008 7:21 pm Reply with quote

The Finnish War and the Kvarken crossing

Disclaimer: I'm by no means a military history buff, and I imagine many of you are far more knowledgeable about such matters, so please do correct me if I've got any of this wrong..

Amid the horrors and tragedies of the Napoleonic wars was this strange episode which occurred in 1809, following Russia's short lived alliance with Napoleon and subsequent declaration of war on Sweden and Swedish ruled Finland.

At the begining of the year, having driven the Swedes from Finland, Russia prepared to invade the Swedish mainland. Fearing the powerful Swedish fleet patrolling the Gulf of Bothnia, the Russians planned instead to launch their assault on Sweden in winter, while the Gulf was ice-bound. While the main branches of the Russian army headed south, across the ┼land islands, and north, through Lapland, a third, smaller force led by General Barclay de Tolly set off across the Kvarken straits - a narrow point on the Gulf of Bothnia.

Barclay de Tolly's force, comprising some 3800 men with accompanying horses and artillery pieces marched 100km across the frozen sea in fearsome weather conditions to arrive at the Swedish city of Umeň. Rumours of the Russians' plan had filtered through to the Swedish troops defending Umeň, but were dismissed as absurd. On Barclay de Tolly's arrival the bewildered Swedes quickly surrendered and were relieved of their weapons.

Two days later, word reached Umeň that the Swedish King had been overthrown and an armistice between the two forces had been signed. To the relief and astonishment of the people of Umeň, Barclay de Tolly issued a proclamation of goodwill from Tsar Alexander after which the Russians returned the Swedish troops their arms and marched back to Finland the way they had come.

Though the Kvarken crossing ultimately played little part in the war, the exploits of the troops were celebrated back in Russia and Barclay de Tolly was made Governor-General of Finland. Finland remained in Russian hands until 1919.

Sources:
    - The Commander: A Life of Barclay de Tolly by Michael and Diana Josselson
    - Wikipedia

Note: Though Barclay de Tolly is famous for crossing the Kvarken, he and his troops were not the first to do so. The route had been frequently used in the past by intrepid Swedish postmen (link).

 
Curious Danny
279869.  Mon Feb 18, 2008 12:58 pm Reply with quote

The Russian Civil War (1917-1922/3) for being a decidedly messy war and came just after Russia pulled out of a world war!
Combatants known as the Reds, the Whites and the Greens.
Winston Churchill, the war secretary, encouraged Britian to get involved and sent ú100 million worth of supplies to the Whites who he saw as allies against Bolshevism.
While Russia disintegrated, Japan, France, USA, Italy, Serbia, Romania, Greece and Canada all got involved, asking "what's in it for me?"

 
QiScorpion
279990.  Mon Feb 18, 2008 4:25 pm Reply with quote

Apparently in the Boer war, the british army won the battle of Rorke's Drift (i think it's called that ) by singing at the zulus. the zulus apparently just disappeared. maybe the british army was bad at singing....

 
gerontius grumpus
280016.  Mon Feb 18, 2008 5:10 pm Reply with quote

QiScorpion wrote:
Apparently in the Boer war, the british army won the battle of Rorke's Drift (i think it's called that ) by singing at the zulus. the zulus apparently just disappeared. maybe the british army was bad at singing....


Wouldn't that be the Zulu wars then?

 
RICKY66
280047.  Mon Feb 18, 2008 6:14 pm Reply with quote

[quote="gerontius grumpus"]
QiScorpion wrote:
Apparently in the Boer war, the british army won the battle of Rorke's Drift (i think it's called that ) by singing at the zulus. the zulus apparently just disappeared. maybe the british army was bad at singing....


I think you take the piss sir!

You must read about Rorke's Drift:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rorke%27s_Drift

 
mikeyfone
280064.  Mon Feb 18, 2008 6:51 pm Reply with quote

It was the Royal Welch. They terrified everyone with the close harmony singing.

 
mr2mk1g
280331.  Tue Feb 19, 2008 8:24 am Reply with quote

QI Point - the war song sung by the Zulu's in the film Zulu was later transplanted into the mouths of the Germanic tribes fought by the Romans at the start of the film Gladiator, (as in the soundtrack from Zulu was litterally just edited straight into the later film).

 

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