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themoog
138345.  Wed Jan 24, 2007 5:28 am Reply with quote

indigo fugit wrote:
This same presenter said that the food of the Monkey Eating Eagle was rarely monkeys but sloths. Apparently, the first one that was examined had eaten a monkey so it was wrongly assumed that that was its usual food.

Perhaps he was right about this as well. I will check and get back to you.


This is why it (Pithecophaga jefferyi) was renamed Philippine Eagle. It's diet is far more varied. The genus Pithecophaga (meaning monkey eater) remains though. A truly magnificent bird.

 
indigo fugit
138386.  Wed Jan 24, 2007 6:08 am Reply with quote

Quote:
This is why it (Pithecophaga jefferyi) was renamed Philippine Eagle. It's diet is far more varied. The genus Pithecophaga (meaning monkey eater) remains though. A truly magnificent bird.


A lot of loose ends being tidied up.

Off topic for a moment.

Did the same thing happen to the manx shearwater ‘puffinus puffinus’?

Apparently the first ones were found in rabbit burrows alongside side the puffins and were thought to be related.

 
themoog
138416.  Wed Jan 24, 2007 6:46 am Reply with quote

Definitely drifting OT. The answer is a bit more complicated and involves idiosyncrasies of taxonomic nomenclature. Is it worth starting a new thread in QI Animals?

 
indigo fugit
142088.  Sun Feb 04, 2007 8:17 am Reply with quote

themoog wrote:
idiosyncrasies taxonomic nomenclature. -- Is it worth starting a new thread in QI Animals?


No

I'm still trying to understand your last post. ((:-(

 
themoog
142540.  Mon Feb 05, 2007 9:20 am Reply with quote

indigo fugit wrote:
themoog wrote:
idiosyncrasies taxonomic nomenclature. -- Is it worth starting a new thread in QI Animals?


No

I'm still trying to understand your last post. ((:-(


OK. Have you been trying for the past 10 days?

 
indigo fugit
142577.  Mon Feb 05, 2007 10:14 am Reply with quote

Hi Themoog, I was a little slothful and have only just looked up the big words. I'm impressed.

Staying on topic

In South America the smaller sloths are kept as pets.

 
cybermuda
202586.  Tue Aug 21, 2007 11:59 am Reply with quote

Why does The Book of GI say that two-toed sloths have six or eight toes?
Surely they have six (three on each foot) or ten (plus two on each hand)?

 
Orphea
243728.  Wed Dec 12, 2007 8:43 am Reply with quote

cybermuda wrote:
Why does The Book of GI say that two-toed sloths have six or eight toes?
Surely they have six (three on each foot) or ten (plus two on each hand)?


Uh? How many hands has your sloth got?

 
Orphea
243753.  Wed Dec 12, 2007 9:00 am Reply with quote

Okay, I'm going to go to all the trouble of typing this up because sloths are one of my favourite animals, Life of Pi is one of my favourite books and those of you who care about one but not the other should still have the pleasure of reading this - 'cos it always makes me laugh. Here goes: (
Life of Pi, Yann Martel, Chapter 1
-
"There are two-toed sloths and there are three toed sloths, the case being determined by the forepaws of the animals, since all sloths have three claws on their hind paws. I had the great luck one summer of studying the three-toed sloth in situ in the equatorial jungles of Brazil. It is a highly intriguing creature. Its only real habit is indolence. It sleeps or rests on average twenty hours a day. Our team tested the sleep habits of five wild three-toed sloths by placing on their heads, in the early afternoon after they had fallen asleep, bright red plastic dishes filled with water. We found them still in place late the next morning, the water of the dishes swarming with insects. The sloth is at its busiest at sunset, using the word busy here in its most relaxed sense. It moves along the bough of a tree in its characteristic upside down position at the speed of roughly 400 metres an hour. On the ground, it crawls to its next tree at the rate of 250 metres an hour, when motivated, which is 440 times slower than a motivated cheetah. Unmotivated, it covers four to five metres in an hour.

The three-toed sloth is not well informed about the outside world. On a scale of 2 to 10, where 2 represents unusual dullness and 10 extreme acuity, Beebe (1926) gave the sloth's senses of taste, touch, sight and hearing a rating of 2, and its sense of smell a rating of 3. If you come upon a sleeping three-toed sloth in the wild, two or three nudges should suffice to awaken it; it will then look sleepily in every direction but yours. Why it should look about is uncertain since the sloth sees everything in a Magoo-like blur. As for hearing, the sloth is not so much deaf as uninterested in sound. Beebe reported that firing guns next to sleeping or feeding sloths elicited little reaction. And the sloth's slightly better sense of smell should not be overestimated. They are said to be able to sniff and avoid decayed branches, but Bullock (1968) reported that sloths fall to the ground clinging to decayed branches 'often'."

And yes, I do know that Pi is a work of fiction but I'm giving credit here for good research and, even if it's wrong, that doesn't stop it being charming.


Last edited by Orphea on Wed Dec 12, 2007 2:05 pm; edited 1 time in total

 
swot
243921.  Wed Dec 12, 2007 11:39 am Reply with quote

That's delightfully written. I must procure a copy.

 
Orphea
244048.  Wed Dec 12, 2007 2:02 pm Reply with quote

no1 school swot wrote:
That's delightfully written. I must procure a copy.

Hope you love it as much as I do.

 
indigo fugit
244107.  Wed Dec 12, 2007 4:20 pm Reply with quote

no1 school swot wrote:
That's delightfully written. I must procure a copy.


another word I have to look up.

 
Bondee
870246.  Mon Dec 12, 2011 4:44 pm Reply with quote

Meet The Sloths.

Filmed at the world's only sloth orphanage in Costa Rica.

 
Zebra57
870267.  Mon Dec 12, 2011 7:33 pm Reply with quote

Can recommend a visit to London's Natural History Museum which has an excellent skeleton of an extinct Giant Ground Sloth on display.

 
GavinT
878798.  Thu Jan 19, 2012 11:20 am Reply with quote

Orphea wrote:
cybermuda wrote:
Why does The Book of GI say that two-toed sloths have six or eight toes?
Surely they have six (three on each foot) or ten (plus two on each hand)?


Uh? How many hands has your sloth got?


He's quite right though you know. 6 Toes on the feet plus 4 fingers/toes on the 'hands'. So the answer should be 6 or 10 but not 8.

 

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