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Family Words

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Gaazy
17441.  Mon Apr 11, 2005 1:52 pm Reply with quote

In their purest form, these would be words coined within family units to represent things or concepts for which no standard words exist.

For example, my brother and his family have a word "pocnoc", for which the definition is: a picnic eaten in the car, because by the time you have arrived at your destination the weather is too awful to eat it outside.

It's a bit like Liff, I suppose, except that these a) aren't (necessarily) also existing placenames, and b) are actually used routinely as part of the vocabulary.

 
dotcom
17444.  Mon Apr 11, 2005 2:49 pm Reply with quote

We have the term "freezer diving" for a junk-food meal, which is nearly the same thing.

 
Flash
17445.  Mon Apr 11, 2005 4:26 pm Reply with quote

"Gregious", a cross between "egregious" and ""grievious", ie outstandingly regrettable.

 
Gaazy
17450.  Mon Apr 11, 2005 4:42 pm Reply with quote

I remember the humorist Patrick Campbell explaining a family phrase a goss on the potted meat as being a glancing blow to the pink ball in a game of croquet. "Goss" was for "gossamer", and because much of the pink colour had come off the ball to reveal the darker base colour, the family fancied it resembled potted meat. Hence a goss on the potted meat - a phrase incomprehensible to the outside world until parsed.

 
Flash
17452.  Mon Apr 11, 2005 4:53 pm Reply with quote

And not really much use even then.

 
Beehive
17454.  Mon Apr 11, 2005 5:28 pm Reply with quote

I may just be being tetchy, but family words seems to be one of those topics (like dreams and children), where everyone wants to talk about their own but is not that interested in anyone else's.

 
Commander
17461.  Tue Apr 12, 2005 4:25 am Reply with quote

We refer to email as eelmay.

 
Commander
17462.  Tue Apr 12, 2005 4:26 am Reply with quote

And of course, 'Beecham's Powders' are Beecher's Powdums.

 
Gaazy
17466.  Tue Apr 12, 2005 5:07 am Reply with quote

Beehive wrote:
I may just be being tetchy, but family words seems to be one of those topics (like dreams and children), where everyone wants to talk about their own but is not that interested in anyone else's.
I mentioned one of my recurring dreams to an author and she put it in a book.

In actual fact, dream-explanation books are best-sellers, so someone must be interested.

Come to think of it, I had that dratted dream the other night too.

 
Jenny
17470.  Tue Apr 12, 2005 7:24 am Reply with quote

<opens notebook> Settle down on this couch, Mr Gaazy, and tell us all...

 
Gaazy
17474.  Tue Apr 12, 2005 9:59 am Reply with quote

Jenny wrote:
<opens notebook> Settle down on this couch, Mr Gaazy, and tell us all...
Meet me over at the Interpretation of Dreams thread...

 
Natalie
17476.  Tue Apr 12, 2005 10:50 am Reply with quote

My Dad and I once made an ostrich (it was supposed to be one, anyway), but looked more like a goose, and so became a gostrich. If that counts.

 
Commander
17478.  Tue Apr 12, 2005 11:23 am Reply with quote

Natalie wrote:
My Dad and I once made an ostrich (it was supposed to be one, anyway), but looked more like a goose, and so became a gostrich. If that counts.


Is your surname Frankenstein by any chance?

 
laidbacklazyman
17484.  Tue Apr 12, 2005 4:19 pm Reply with quote

I often have a blat fattery on my mobley

is that how you play this game? I tried liff but couldn't get the hang.

Not strictly family but at work a number of guides do have words with their trouble one of which quoted Dr Johnson as saying "when a man is tired of living he's tired of life" but not sure if that would count

 
Gaazy
17496.  Wed Apr 13, 2005 2:23 am Reply with quote

In college days 35 years ago, the côterie with which I hanged out was tiresomely hooked on spoonerisms - not the classic ones that make new sense such as delivering a blushing crow or tasting a whole worm but simple transpositions such as coiling the bettle. Sometimes the spoonerisms got so entrenched that we found ourselves spoonerising the spoonerism, and coming up with the classic boiling the kettle. D'uh.

This leads on to a much more interesting restricted language, that of Verlan, spoken mainly in the South of France - the highlighted hyperlink will explain better than I can, but the QI point about it is that the transpositions peculiar to Verlan now get applied to the Verlan words themselves, making them even more incomprehensible to the outsider.

 

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