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DaveA
261628.  Sat Jan 19, 2008 9:01 am Reply with quote

The etymology of 'dog' is said to be a mystery. It repalced the word 'hund' (hound) in the 16th century.
I have a theory on this which I've not seen anywhere else so it will need looking at critically:

In Tudor times it was common for kitchens to have different ways of turning meat over a fire, the spit boy was the lowliest job, and the task was assumed by a corgi-like canine in a wheel for smaller joints. The wheel was called a turnspit or a dogwheel.
see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Turnspit_Dog

I am suggesting that the term 'dogwheel' led to the animal being called a dog, not the other way around as tends to be assumed. ie. The term 'dogwheel' could have meant a wheel for turning a dog, or old English 'dag', another word for a spit. We still use the term Dogwood for certain members of the Cornus family of shrub, which was named for it's straight stems ideal for skewering meat to cook over a fire.

By the time of the first book on 'dogges' (by John Caius in 1570 - predating the authoratative dictionary and standardisation of spelling) the term was already established, but the auhtor and contemporaries still used various terms: dogge, hound, cur...
See: http://www.thebookofdays.com/months/april/8.htm

Interestingly, the breed used in the dogwheel was refered to as a Turnspit, the term which also applied to the wheel itself, the spit turner, the dag/dog turner, the animal was known by it's job.

 
Fontanelle
264848.  Thu Jan 24, 2008 11:27 am Reply with quote

Does anyone know what percentage of the dog's brain is used?

 
CB27
264885.  Thu Jan 24, 2008 12:31 pm Reply with quote

French restaurants probably use as much as possible :)

Sorry, not other details.

 
DaveA
265215.  Thu Jan 24, 2008 10:03 pm Reply with quote

jampott wrote:
Jenny wrote:
Why do dogs howl?....


Some dogs appear more ready to howl than others, even amongst the same breed. I have 2 Dalmatians, quite closely related. One will whimper and howl when the phone rings, the oven timer pips, the alarm clock goes off - or any other similar noise which either repeats or lasts more than a brief moment. The other couldn't be less interested.

I wonder why?


Since the two dogs are close relatives it could be that their reponses are due to varying degrees of intelligence. Specifically, the abilty to over-ride the natural response to a percieved howl (having worked out what does and what does not require a response).

On the other hand, how do the two dogs respond to intruders or real howls from other dogs? Some dogs, like people, prefer to keep a low profile and avoid confrontation. Also there is the matter of status, the pack leader takes the lead and the others back him/her up when required.

 
DaveA
265216.  Thu Jan 24, 2008 10:17 pm Reply with quote

Jenny wrote:
Howling is a form of communication for dogs, as it is for wolves. Dogs sometimes howl when they hear high-pitched tones because they interpret it as another dog howling in the distance. ....


Not all domestic dogs need have wolf ancestors. There are other wild dogs like the many types of foxes, Cape Hunting Dogs and the Dhole of India. The latter is quite distinct in that they communicate by whistling! A sort of highly developed whine. Thus thier 'howl' can be so pitched as to be inaudible to us.

 
thegrandwazoo
265417.  Fri Jan 25, 2008 10:19 am Reply with quote

Village~Idiot wrote:
Where did 'dogs can't look up' come from? I don't see how it was made up...

At a pub somewhere?


I can assure you from personal observation and experience that dogs can look up. However my experience suggests they only do it when their attention is attracted upwards. As has already been pointed out on this thread a dogs vision is not it's main sense and their peripheral vision seems to be poor. If you watch a dog that has been alerted to something it will stand and sniff and listen, it doesn't look about like we do. It would be truer to say that dogs don't look up as a matter of course.

 
PDR
265420.  Fri Jan 25, 2008 10:29 am Reply with quote

Dogs can look up, but they can't look up a phone number.

I hope that clears up the confusion.

Quote:
All road signals have the red, amber, green light sequence in the same order. Hence, when dogs see the traffic lights, although they cannot distinguish between red and green (dogs are red-green colour blind) they can distinguish between which light is on.


Well you may wish to rely on this, but personally I still think it doesn't make it any safer to allow blind people to drive.

PDR

 
Akita Stud
413930.  Sat Sep 27, 2008 3:08 pm Reply with quote

Quote:
Howling is a form of communication for dogs, as it is for wolves. Dogs sometimes howl when they hear high-pitched tones because they interpret it as another dog howling in the distan


I own Akitas and it is very rare that they either bark or howl. The dog breed Basenji do not howl but make a yodel noise.

 
Rudolph Hucker
414010.  Sat Sep 27, 2008 7:37 pm Reply with quote

Aren't akitas Japanese fighting dogs?

If so, why would anyone want to own one? (Apart from taking part in dog fighting in Japan)

 
richt
520765.  Thu Mar 12, 2009 8:50 am Reply with quote

An odd comment - just because we call it a "Japanese Fighting Dog" doesn't mean it has to do that - we could call it it a "cuddly sofa dog" what does it do then?




Rudolph Hucker wrote:
Aren't akitas Japanese fighting dogs?

If so, why would anyone want to own one? (Apart from taking part in dog fighting in Japan)

 
Rudolph Hucker
520784.  Thu Mar 12, 2009 9:19 am Reply with quote

richt wrote:
An odd comment - just because we call it a "Japanese Fighting Dog" doesn't mean it has to do that - we could call it it a "cuddly sofa dog" what does it do then?




Rudolph Hucker wrote:
Aren't akitas Japanese fighting dogs?

If so, why would anyone want to own one? (Apart from taking part in dog fighting in Japan)


What's odd about it?

Pit Bulls no longer have anything to do with terrorising bulls but they are still evil bastard dogs that no sane person would ever consider as a pet.

The Akita is similarly nasty but bigger and stronger.

I propose that anyone who wants to keep one of these animals as a pet should have to pass a simple test of their sanity and if they pass it they can have any vicious, dangerous animal they choose.

The test question is 'Do you wish to own a vicious, terrifyingly strong animal of dubious temperment and keep it as a family pet?'

If the answer is 'Yes' then the applicant is clearly deranged and should not be allowed to have one.

Anyone else who passes the test can keep crocodiles or tigers as well if they so choose.

 
Jenny
520886.  Thu Mar 12, 2009 12:22 pm Reply with quote

I don't keep dogs, but my stepdaughter breeds English mastiffs, and recently told me about the rehabilitation of pit bulls formerly used for fighting.

 
bemahan
520900.  Thu Mar 12, 2009 12:33 pm Reply with quote

DaveA wrote:
In Tudor times it was common for kitchens to have different ways of turning meat over a fire, the spit boy was the lowliest job, and the task was assumed by a corgi-like canine in a wheel for smaller joints. The wheel was called a turnspit or a dogwheel.
see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Turnspit_Dog

I am suggesting that the term 'dogwheel' led to the animal being called a dog, not the other way around as tends to be assumed. ie. The term 'dogwheel' could have meant a wheel for turning a dog, or old English 'dag', another word for a spit. We still use the term Dogwood for certain members of the Cornus family of shrub, which was named for it's straight stems ideal for skewering meat to cook over a fire.


There is also the word "firedog" - device of metal or ceramic intended to hold logs above the hearth (and so improving air circulation). This further indicates that maybe "dog" was a word associated with the fire itself originally.

 
Rudolph Hucker
520903.  Thu Mar 12, 2009 12:39 pm Reply with quote

Interesting stuff but I still wouldn't trust one.

When they do maul/kill children (and they do) the owners always seem bemused and say things like 'it's so out of character, Biffo has always played nicely with children before now; no-one could have foreseen this tragedy'

No, it's not out of character and a one-eyed man looking down the wrong end of a broken telescope could have foreseen it.

 
PDR
521028.  Thu Mar 12, 2009 5:25 pm Reply with quote

Interesting. Do you have similarly disparaging views on that other vicious, dangerous predator, the cat?

PDR

 

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