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thePhantom
131794.  Sat Jan 06, 2007 1:00 pm Reply with quote

Yes that's right, those bum sniffing, garden wrecking canines! i know we have talked about dogs before but we can't have a true list of Qi animals without them.
i'm not the person to asthound us all (sorry) with dog facts but i'm sure somebody soon will.

quick Qi facts
*Dogs are descended from a small, weasel-like mammal
*Dogs were first domesticated by cavemen in the Palaeolithic age
*Dogs have great senses of smell and hearing, however they don't have a very good sense of sight (maybe even colourblind?).

 
grizzly
131807.  Sat Jan 06, 2007 1:35 pm Reply with quote

Quote:
cavemen


KLAXON

They weren't cavemen. Haven't you read the book?

 
96aelw
131885.  Sat Jan 06, 2007 5:28 pm Reply with quote

Let's not be too hasty with the klaxon there, sir. I haven't read The Book (genuflects), so I don't really know what I may or may not be disagreeing with, here, but I have just read an excellent book entitled Homo Britannicus, by Chris Stringer, which is about human occupation of Britain from its earliest days (about 700,000 years ago) up until about 8,00 years ago, in the Mesolithic. In it, mention of Paleolithic types having lived in caves (which I rashly assume is the bone of contention) definitely occurs. One such occurrence I have specially looked up is with reference to Gough's Cave, in Cheddar Gorge. Stringer never mentions any specific evidence that the human use of the cave was residential, but he often makes statements which assume it was.

The reason I mention this specific example, which dates to about 14,000 years ago (during the Upper (most recent bit of the) Paleolithic), is that the cave also yielded many animal bones, including some originally identified as wolf bones. Some more recent researchers reckon they're a bit small for wolves, and instead propose that this may be the earliest evidence of domesticated dogs in Britain, which ties in neatly with what the thread is supposed to be about.

Of course, if the 'not cavemen' thing refers to some other quibble, you can ignore all of that. Sorry.

 
Fudgie
131905.  Sat Jan 06, 2007 6:15 pm Reply with quote

thePhantom wrote:

*Dogs have great senses of smell and hearing, however they don't have a very good sense of sight (maybe even colourblind?).


How does that work for a guide dog then?

Or is that where the saying "the blind leading the blind" comes from?!

 
grizzly
131910.  Sat Jan 06, 2007 6:30 pm Reply with quote

All road signals have the red, amber, green light sequence in the same order. Hence, when dogs see the traffic lights, although they cannot distinguish between red and green (dogs are red-green colour blind) they can distinguish between which light is on.

Both the NS and QI books (both of which I got for xmas) discuss dogs and in the case of the NS book, traffic lights also. Hence I'm not sure on the source for this but I'm sure it is one of the two books.

I'll hunt down the caveman thing in the QI book somewhen else.

 
BondiTram
131970.  Sun Jan 07, 2007 8:03 am Reply with quote

Dogs may not have very good eyesight but it depends on what you mean by that. My dogs, a greyhound (commonly placed in the sighthound grouping) and a Breton Spaniel (usually renowned for their scenting abilities), see very well what they are looking at but seem to be less effective at noticing things. That is, their proliferal(sp?) vision does not seem so great. They both, however, rush around in the dark without banging into things though.

In the light of all that, Fudgies question

Quote:
How does that work for a guide dog then?


seems quite relevant. If I needed a guide dog and it didn't turn its head a full 180 degrees before leading me across the road, I would be quite worried. But then, If I needed a guide dog I wouldn't know whether it had or hadn't, would I?

 
samivel
131979.  Sun Jan 07, 2007 8:39 am Reply with quote

Peripheral.


:)

 
BondiTram
132308.  Mon Jan 08, 2007 11:06 am Reply with quote

Thanks Samivel, what a pratt, I don't know if was thinking pro-life at the time or something to do with wild animals (feral) but I knew it wasn't right. I usually do a quick check with my on-screen French/English dictionary as it normally confirms or corrects my spelling, but this time, not surprisingly, it didn't recognise the fact that I'd spelt the first part wrong as well as the second.
Teach me to get up and walk to the bookshelf next time.

 
Jenny
138962.  Thu Jan 25, 2007 4:42 pm Reply with quote

Why do dogs howl? And more particularly, why do they howl when they hear phones or sirens or people singing?

Howling is a form of communication for dogs, as it is for wolves. Dogs sometimes howl when they hear high-pitched tones because they interpret it as another dog howling in the distance.

Wolves use howling to communicate over long distances because howling goes through different pitches and that helps the sound carry over longer distances. Wolves use howling to let other pack members know where they are, and other pack members howl back to acknowledge that they've heard. They also use it to discourage rival packs from entering their territory.

So if your dog howls when you sing, it isn't a critical comment - he's just letting you know that he heard you.

 
jampott
139074.  Fri Jan 26, 2007 4:16 am Reply with quote

Jenny wrote:
Why do dogs howl? And more particularly, why do they howl when they hear phones or sirens or people singing?

Howling is a form of communication for dogs, as it is for wolves. Dogs sometimes howl when they hear high-pitched tones because they interpret it as another dog howling in the distance.

Wolves use howling to communicate over long distances because howling goes through different pitches and that helps the sound carry over longer distances. Wolves use howling to let other pack members know where they are, and other pack members howl back to acknowledge that they've heard. They also use it to discourage rival packs from entering their territory.

So if your dog howls when you sing, it isn't a critical comment - he's just letting you know that he heard you.


Some dogs appear more ready to howl than others, even amongst the same breed. I have 2 Dalmatians, quite closely related. One will whimper and howl when the phone rings, the oven timer pips, the alarm clock goes off - or any other similar noise which either repeats or lasts more than a brief moment. The other couldn't be less interested.

I wonder why?

 
Curious Danny
215142.  Sun Sep 30, 2007 2:17 pm Reply with quote

Damaltians are the only dogs that get gout

Also, on the guide dog thing, i'm sure i heard that the beeping sound at pelican crossings is for the dogs. They haven't learnt about the green cross code.

 
samivel
215170.  Sun Sep 30, 2007 4:37 pm Reply with quote

Curious Danny wrote:
Damaltians are the only dogs that get gout


Source?

 
Curious Danny
215511.  Mon Oct 01, 2007 11:06 am Reply with quote

Actually, i read it in "Why pandas do handstands" by Augustus Brown.

Quote:
Uniquely among dogs, they (damaltians) lack the enzyme uricase, which breaks down uric acid. As a result, the acid can build up in joints and cause kidney stones


This is the human form of gout. According to this website, this is the dog version:

Quote:
Canine gout is an imbalance in mineral assimilation resulting in abnormal deposits, sometimes between bones, often in layers of the skin or integument. Calcium deposits in the skin can be the result of injury, of metabolic changes, or of unknown factors. Since mineralization (calcium deposits) in skin can occur in a wide variety of unrelated diseases, a common thread among them is not easy to establish. One form of the condition is related to, or could be an early indication of, a canine version of the disorder which in humans is called Cushing’s Disease, although many dogs will never develop the distended abdomen, susceptibility to hematomas and bruising, or over-pigmented, sparsely-coated skin.


http://www.dogstuff.info/canine_gout.html

 
samivel
215689.  Mon Oct 01, 2007 8:49 pm Reply with quote

Ah, thanks.

That link talks of gout in other varieties of dog, though - German Shepherds, Irish Wolfhounds and Great Danes. After all, if it was only Dalmatians that got it, you wouldn't need to call it canine gout.

 
Village~Idiot
252467.  Fri Jan 04, 2008 5:56 pm Reply with quote

Where did 'dogs can't look up' come from? I don't see how it was made up...

At a pub somewhere?

 

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