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Morbo
120512.  Sat Nov 25, 2006 4:44 am Reply with quote

Since i'm from there I thought i'd start this thread.

Some Quite Interesting facts:

- Its the only country which spans the entire continent
- I think its for every 1 person, there's about 7 sheep.
- According to certain people, one face of the $2 has a monkey on it, when infact its an Aboriginal. Just warning people now, so they don't look silly when they come here for holidays.
- Has 6 free-to-air TV stations. All horrible.
- Is trying really hard to become a republic, but still can't do it.
- Has its own version of Chavs, still equally as annoying.
- (supposidly) has its own version of Bigfoot.
- One of the major cities, Adelaide, has been called The City Of Churches. Thats due to.. well, alot of churches in the city.

All I can think of at the moment.

 
Jenny
120604.  Sat Nov 25, 2006 9:40 am Reply with quote

Sources! We need sources!

 
CaptTimmy
120611.  Sat Nov 25, 2006 10:06 am Reply with quote

This from Wiki, who does not cite references or sources.....
Wikipedia wrote:
Adelaide is sometimes referred to as the "City of Churches." From its earliest, Adelaide attracted immigrants from many countries, particularly German migrants escaping religious persecution. They brought with them the vine cuttings that founded the acclaimed wineries of the Barossa Valley. After the Second World War, Italians, Greeks, Dutch, Poles, and possibly every other European nationality came to make a new start. An influx of Asian immigrants following the Vietnam War added to the mix. These new arrivals have blended to form a rich and diverse cuisine and vibrant restaurant culture.


Adelaide Travel Information | Lonely Planet Destination Guide wrote:
When the early colonists arrived and began building Adelaide they used stone. They wanted to build a solid, dignified city, a civilised and calm place, with a manner no other state capital in the country could match. Nowadays, much to the wowsers' chagrin, pubs and nightclubs outnumber the churches.


That one almost contradicts the previous, assuming that I've got the definition of wowsers' and chagrin correct.

 
CaptTimmy
120612.  Sat Nov 25, 2006 10:10 am Reply with quote



I assume you speak of the reverse of the two dollar coin....do correct me if I'm wrong.

 
CaptTimmy
120613.  Sat Nov 25, 2006 10:11 am Reply with quote

The Age wrote:
It may be time to retire the sheep jokes.

Statistics New Zealand this week broke the news that the national flock had fallen to a mere 39 million at June 30, its lowest since numbers peaked in 1982 at 70.3 million.

For the record, there are just over 4.06 million humans in New Zealand, meaning there are now less than 10 sheep for every person.

By comparison, Australia had 103 million sheep at the end of June - also near historic lows - and an estimated population today of 20.23 million, leaving Australians outnumbered by sheep five to one.

New Zealand's ovine population has long made it the butt of jokes.

"When I was growing up in the '70s we were known as the country of 60 million sheep and three million people," said Graeme Peters of the Federated Farmers of New Zealand.

The federation says the elimination of agriculture subsidies in the 1980s is behind the decline.

"Prior to 1985 ... it didn't really matter what you produced as long as it had four legs," North Island lamb farmer Ian Corney said.

Advertisement
AdvertisementHe said the change produced more efficient farming, with a greater tonnage of lamb meat produced from a smaller flock, whose numbers were now likely to stabilise or even grow.

Recently released estimates bear that out, indicating more than three million extra spring lambs bouncing around the paddocks compared with last year.

"(We're) farming more smarter so therefore the export volume is going out."

Mr Corney also said a lot of land once grazed by sheep was now dedicated to dairy cattle or pine plantations.

However, he did not expect Australians to stop telling sheep jokes about Kiwis.

"We don't take any notice of them, just as long as you don't talk cricket at the present moment," he said, referring to Australia's two-nil whitewash of the Black Caps.

- AAP

 
CaptTimmy
120614.  Sat Nov 25, 2006 10:13 am Reply with quote

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Australian_republicanism

Quote:
Proposals for change
A typical proposal for an Australian republic provides for the Queen and Governor General to be replaced by a president. There is much debate on the appointment process that would be used and what role such an office would have.

From its foundation until the 1999 referendum, the Australian Republican Movement (ARM) supported the bi-partisan appointment model, which would result in a President elected by the Parliament of Australia, with the powers currently held by the Queen and the Governor-General. It was argued that the requirement of a two-thirds majority in a vote of both houses of parliament would result in a bi-partisanship appointment, preventing a party politician from becoming president.

Many republicans did not support this model, preferring the President to be directly elected. Of these republicans, there are some who continue to advocate minimal change or codification of the President's powers. Others support extensive constitutional reform and the President having greater discretion in using his or her powers than the Governor-General.

An alternative, 'minimalist', approach to change provides for the replacement of the Queen alone and retaining the Governor-General. The most notable model of this type is the McGarvie Model while Copernican Models replace the Queen with a directly-elected figurehead. If this were to happen, it would be a first, as all other former Commonwealth Realms have created presidencies upon becoming republics.

Australians for Constitutional Monarchy and the Australian Monarchist League, who reject republicanism, argue that no model is better than the present system and argue that the risk and difficulty of changing the constitution is best demonstrated by inability of republicans to back a definitive design.

 
CaptTimmy
120616.  Sat Nov 25, 2006 10:19 am Reply with quote

Not only is there an alleged Australian Bigfoot (Yowie) but there is a video of it. And it certainly looks like Chewbacca.

http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=-5305313684219884253 Original Video Clip of the Yowie

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=noDR6KH8M2c Enhanced version of the above.

Thus ends my spiel of quick searches.

 
Neotenic
120634.  Sat Nov 25, 2006 11:00 am Reply with quote

Morbo wrote:
Its the only country which spans the entire continent


This isn't exactly right.

A quick Wiki-adventure has told me that I wasn't right either, as I thought that Australasia or Oceania was the name of the continent. But continental Australia also includes New Guinea and Tasmania, and some other dinky islands - but not New Zealand as it is on a different shelf.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Australia_%28continent%29

Personally speaking, I think 'Meganesia' is the best name for a continent ever.

 
strukkanurv
120643.  Sat Nov 25, 2006 11:19 am Reply with quote

So, if you're incontinent, you may be referred to as 'Meganesian'?

Sorry for that.

Where are my tablets...?

 
suze
120654.  Sat Nov 25, 2006 12:07 pm Reply with quote

It's actually less right than that.

It has already been noted that Australia only spans an entire continent if we define Australia to be a continent. Otherwise, there are places like New Zealand, PNG and numerous smaller countries we must consider.

But, the verb "to span" means to cross from one side to the other. Therefore, Canada spans an entire continent, having as it does a coastline on both the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. Although they are less wide, so do Mexico, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, Costa Rica and Panama. Oh, and the country whose name I forget, the one that sits between Canada and Mexico.

One could argue that Russia that spans the entire continent of Asia as well, although that is perhaps more dubious.

 
Morbo
120757.  Sat Nov 25, 2006 10:39 pm Reply with quote

Alright, fine! Be that way. I still stand by my country for as long as i'm here, then i'll agree with you *nods*.

And yes, the Reverse side of the $2 coin, to the people who have never seen it before say it looks like a monkey! Well, thats what my girlfriend said when she first got here. *giggling madly* The look on her face when I told her otherwise.. i'd seriously pay to see it again.

 
Lumpo31
120761.  Sat Nov 25, 2006 11:37 pm Reply with quote

Neotenic wrote:
Morbo wrote:
Its the only country which spans the entire continent


This isn't exactly right.

A quick Wiki-adventure has told me that I wasn't right either, as I thought that Australasia or Oceania was the name of the continent. But continental Australia also includes New Guinea and Tasmania, and some other dinky islands - but not New Zealand as it is on a different shelf.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Australia_%28continent%29

Personally speaking, I think 'Meganesia' is the best name for a continent ever.


Ask any Australian what the name of the continent (including Tasmania and all those little islands) is called, and they shall answer "Australia". Including myself. My daughter was marked incorrect at school here in the UK for calling the continent "Australia" rather than of "Australasia", which she found offensive, given that she'd spent 8 out of 9 years living in the place, and nobody else in the class had. Honestly, nobody calls it that in Australia. Nor do they call it that in New Zealand, Papua New Guinea, or, dare I say it, anywhere in the South Pacific Region.

Australasia (or Oceania if you must) contains NZ, PNG, etc, but Australia is the continent (plus Tasmania and the islands), the wide brown land, the place with gold and soil and wealth for toil, heck, even one girt by sea...Papua New Guinea is self-governing too by the way, they'd get very offended if they heard people were saying they were part of Australia (actually, the Papua bit is part of Indonesia; New Guinea is independent).

I believe it's a UK phenomenon at the very least to use the term Australasia. If you're referring to the continental shelf, then use Australasia by all means. But if you're referring to the place Australians come from, please, it's simply Australia.

Lisa

EDIT - coming down off my high horse I took a glance at the Wiki page referred to earlier. I grant there's some merit to it, but I still disagree. The geological definition of a continent is different to what the general definition is, and for Australians, the Continent is that which includes the country of Australia, nothing more nothing less...

(I'm reminded of the saying, "My mind is made up: don't confuse me with facts")


Last edited by Lumpo31 on Sat Nov 25, 2006 11:53 pm; edited 1 time in total

 
Lumpo31
120762.  Sat Nov 25, 2006 11:44 pm Reply with quote

suze wrote:
It's actually less right than that.

It has already been noted that Australia only spans an entire continent if we define Australia to be a continent. Otherwise, there are places like New Zealand, PNG and numerous smaller countries we must consider.

But, the verb "to span" means to cross from one side to the other. Therefore, Canada spans an entire continent, having as it does a coastline on both the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. Although they are less wide, so do Mexico, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, Costa Rica and Panama. Oh, and the country whose name I forget, the one that sits between Canada and Mexico.

One could argue that Russia that spans the entire continent of Asia as well, although that is perhaps more dubious.


I feel you misunderstand what Morbo is saying, and are possibly being just the slightest bit picky.

Australia is probably better defined as the only "island-continent". As I said earlier, Australia doesn't include New Zealand, Papua New Guinea, any other South Pacific islands apart from Tasmania (an Australian state) and various other coastal ones.

Grow up in Australia and you live with the understanding that Australia is the largest island and the smallest continent (continent in terms of there being Asia, Africa, North America, South America, Europe, Antarctica...and Australia).

New Zealand and Papua New Guinea are not continents, nor do they belong to any continents (although you could argue that the Papua bit, being part of Indonesia, is therefore politically part of the Asian continent). They are islands...They are part of the Australasia/Oceania region, but they aren't part of the Australian continent.

Lisa

EDIT - see my comments above. You mean what they taught me in school wasn't *all* correct and unbiased and infallible??

 
Lumpo31
120766.  Sun Nov 26, 2006 12:09 am Reply with quote

CaptTimmy wrote:
Not only is there an alleged Australian Bigfoot (Yowie) but there is a video of it. And it certainly looks like Chewbacca.

http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=-5305313684219884253 Original Video Clip of the Yowie

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=noDR6KH8M2c Enhanced version of the above.

Thus ends my spiel of quick searches.


The YouTube clip freaked me out a bit...Interesting because it looked a lot like the illustration on this site - http://tinyurl.com/y5he3w (Australian Yowie Research).

My brother claims to have encountered Yowies on a couple of occasions...one threw stones at him (large rocks really) and another made the most blood-curdling noises imaginable. He reproduced this noise once whilst I was driving, just over two years ago. I still wish he hadn't!

Our father lives in the Blue Mountains region west of Sydney and my brother used to go camping up there when he was a scout; it's extreme wilderness in places, and given the vastness of Australia, relatively small human population and the thickness of bushland it's not hard to believe these creatures exist independently of humans.

Given that there's giant cats roaming free in England it's not too difficult to believe in Yowies. More things in heaven and earth, eh?

Lisa

 
CaptTimmy
120767.  Sun Nov 26, 2006 12:58 am Reply with quote

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1ax0-JZrwsA&mode=related&search=

Still on the topic of bigfoot et al. Here is a clip slightly closer to home for some, Esholt woods (in the U.K.), specifically.

 

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