View previous topic | View next topic

The Use of " 's "

Page 4 of 5
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5  Next

WordLover
142935.  Tue Feb 06, 2007 4:00 am Reply with quote

Gaazy wrote:
Eishkimojo wrote:
http://www.penisland.net/

Go on.

You know you want to.


I assume you already know about this village in North Wales?
And this town in Yorkshire?

 
ikkan
143069.  Tue Feb 06, 2007 8:46 am Reply with quote

Quote:
It reminds me of the (probably apocryphal) story that when Newcastle Poly was changing over to a university, its new name was set to be the Central University of Newcastle upon Tyne until somebody spotted a potential acronym problem....


Being from Newcastle I have heard even more variants than just 'city' or 'central'. None were ever proposed. Northumbria University (as it is now called) is less central than the real uni anyway.

However, the Newcastle University Theatre Society is purposefully named for the acronym.

 
Lumpo31
143140.  Tue Feb 06, 2007 11:06 am Reply with quote

samivel wrote:
I always think of 'together' as 'to get her', but I reckon that's the fault of my primary school teacher, because she told us to think of that in order to spell it correctly.


An American lady I used to know named her son Theodor. She'd had a lot of trouble having him, and it was a family name, so I wasn't going to point out to her what the poor child was likely to get called at school. He's coming up to 5 now, so I think she'll be finding out pretty soon, if she hasn't worked it out already.

Lisa

 
Lumpo31
143141.  Tue Feb 06, 2007 11:09 am Reply with quote

WordLover wrote:
And this town in Yorkshire?


As I've mentioned here before, my Dad lived from age 5 until 15 (when his family emigrated to Australia) in Haworth, West Yorks. It wasn't until I took a photo of the Penistone Moor sign and commented on how rude a name it was that he had ever thought of it in that way. I guess he doesn't naturally break up words.

Lisa

 
Lumpo31
143144.  Tue Feb 06, 2007 11:11 am Reply with quote

ikkan wrote:

Being from Newcastle I have heard even more variants than just 'city' or 'central'. None were ever proposed. Northumbria University (as it is now called) is less central than the real uni anyway.

However, the Newcastle University Theatre Society is purposefully named for the acronym.


Hubby (pre-Hubbyness) tried to get the National Union of Students in Australia to change their name to the Australian National Union of Students...but they were wise to his tricky ways...

Lisa

 
Jenny
143294.  Tue Feb 06, 2007 3:52 pm Reply with quote

Lumpo31 wrote:


An American lady I used to know named her son Theodor. She'd had a lot of trouble having him, and it was a family name, so I wasn't going to point out to her what the poor child was likely to get called at school. He's coming up to 5 now, so I think she'll be finding out pretty soon, if she hasn't worked it out already.

Lisa


I have some (American) friends who called their baby daughter Fuchsia. They are lovely people and she is a gorgeous toddler, now aged two. I did try to dissuade him from the name on the grounds of what she might get called in high school by people who would deliberately mispronounce it. He didn't seem to feel it would be a problem, but I think he's being a little naive.

 
Gaazy
143302.  Tue Feb 06, 2007 4:03 pm Reply with quote

At least they were well-informed enough to get the spelling right - even gardening columnists have been known to call the plant 'fuschia'.

Herr Fuchs would not be pleased.

 
jaygeemack
143308.  Tue Feb 06, 2007 4:19 pm Reply with quote

If you were taliking about the chips from McDonald's restaurant would you say "McDonald's chips" or "McDonald's's chips"?

 
Gaazy
143312.  Tue Feb 06, 2007 4:25 pm Reply with quote

Even more to the point, given that the famous chemist chain has eschewed the apostrophe, is it "Boots's own brand"?

John Boot would not be pleased.

 
gerontius grumpus
143377.  Tue Feb 06, 2007 6:09 pm Reply with quote

jaygeemack wrote:
If you were taliking about the chips from McDonald's restaurant would you say "McDonald's chips" or "McDonald's's chips"?


I think they like you to call them fries.

 
BondiTram
143678.  Wed Feb 07, 2007 12:44 pm Reply with quote

gerontius grumpus wrote:

I think they like you to call them fries.


They can name them in a foreign language in England all they like, but even using English would not induce me to buy or eat the bloody things.
They treat their English customers apallingly, at least in France they use French (frites).

Still won't go near the place though. Yuk!

 
Gaazy
143680.  Wed Feb 07, 2007 12:49 pm Reply with quote

All I know from the few times I've been compelled to eat a McDonald's burger is that it tastes of nothing but pickled gherkin.

 
RichieG
143747.  Wed Feb 07, 2007 1:57 pm Reply with quote

Captain Howdy wrote:
It reminds me of the (probably apocryphal) story that when Newcastle Poly was changing over to a university, its new name was set to be the Central University of Newcastle upon Tyne until somebody spotted a potential acronym problem....

Not forgetting of course the Somerset Lesbian And Gay Society... (I think they've since reversed the 'Lesbian' and 'Gay' parts of their name)

 
duglasbell@hotmail.co.uk
1247249.  Thu Aug 31, 2017 11:51 am Reply with quote

Jenny wrote:
Lumpo31 wrote:


An American lady I used to know named her son Theodor. She'd had a lot of trouble having him, and it was a family name, so I wasn't going to point out to her what the poor child was likely to get called at school. He's coming up to 5 now, so I think she'll be finding out pretty soon, if she hasn't worked it out already.

Lisa


I have some (American) friends who called their baby daughter Fuchsia. They are lovely people and she is a gorgeous toddler, now aged two. I did try to dissuade him from the name on the grounds of what she might get called in high school by people who would deliberately mispronounce it. He didn't seem to feel it would be a problem, but I think he's being a little naive.


Brad Pitt called his daughter 'Shiloh'. A pity he didn't think about the possible spoonerism..

 
duglasbell@hotmail.co.uk
1247250.  Thu Aug 31, 2017 11:53 am Reply with quote

M.hallahan wrote:
Good Evening,

First of all, I apologize if this has already been covered but I'm new here and I couldn't immediately spot it. Secondly, if I am wrong (which I surely am), I'm sorry for my general ignorance!

My question is this; if a name ends in s (such as Jesus) and one wishes to express their ownership of something is it correct to say "Jesus' birthday" or "Jesus's birthday". I previously thought that "Jesus' birthday" was correct. However, on the Christmas special of QI this year I noticed "Jesus's Birthday" on the large screens. I quickly asked a few friends (and with the spellchecker on Microsoft Word), who agreed with me. But perhaps, we're all mistaken

I'd appreciate somebody to shed some light on this.




Thank you

M Hallahan


Many hymnals and religious works that I was taught from often used the expression 'Jesu's'.

When referring to myself personally, I much prefer 'Douglas's'.

 

Page 4 of 5
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5  Next

All times are GMT - 5 Hours


Display posts from previous:   

Search Search Forums

Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2002 phpBB Group