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The Use of " 's "

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Flash
130042.  Sat Dec 30, 2006 11:05 am Reply with quote

Says who?

For example:

The girl's shoes are red.
(ie: the girl has red shoes)

The girls' shoes are red.
(ie: the girls have red shoes)

"Girls's"? I don't think so.

 
BondiTram
130045.  Sat Dec 30, 2006 11:31 am Reply with quote

Well thanks for the explanation Suze, it comes to something when my usage coincides with American (I'm the one constantly shrieking at English people on the screen talking American without knowing it). Nice to know my usage has historical significance although I must admit it really comes from my choice of Elizabeth for my daughter's name because it looked more logical to me. (My Mum was an Elizabeth too, but I didn't know that at the time I named her - still don't, just had to have a quick look at her marriage certificate!)

Having said all that I now realise that I have made a rod for my own back. I substituted 'knowing' and 'know' above when I really wanted to say 'realising' and 'realise' and chickened out.

I think therefore that I must now correct my earlier statement that:

Quote:
BTW 'apologize' is spelt that way in my Concise Oxford and is the way I have always spelt it.


and substitute it with 'I just spell such words the way I feel like at the time'.

 
Gaazy
130069.  Sat Dec 30, 2006 2:10 pm Reply with quote

Yours, his, hers, ours, theirs.

But one's.

(As in: one's hackles rise at seeing solecisms such as your's and their's.)

What is the apostrophe in one's doing there?

 
Nicholls
130257.  Sun Dec 31, 2006 7:48 am Reply with quote

I was taught that either is correct, so it does not matter which form you use.

 
Gaazy
130258.  Sun Dec 31, 2006 7:54 am Reply with quote

Sorry - either form of what?

 
Flash
130268.  Sun Dec 31, 2006 9:41 am Reply with quote

While we're waiting for the answer to that: can anyone explain the apostrophe in "D'oh!"?

 
BondiTram
130279.  Sun Dec 31, 2006 10:35 am Reply with quote

Gaazy wrote:
Yours, his, hers, ours, theirs.

But one's.

(As in: one's hackles rise at seeing solecisms such as your's and their's.)

What is the apostrophe in one's doing there?


All the others are already possessive, one's is not.
Oh, and BTW, you missed out its.

It's, as you already knew of course, is not possessive but short for 'it is'.

 
Gaazy
130345.  Sun Dec 31, 2006 2:32 pm Reply with quote

BondiTram wrote:
All the others are already possessive, one's is not.


Oh, but I disagree. 'One's' is the only acceptable way of writing the non-gender-specific possessive.

 
CaptTimmy
130347.  Sun Dec 31, 2006 2:37 pm Reply with quote

Flash wrote:
While we're waiting for the answer to that: can anyone explain the apostrophe in "D'oh!"?


Wiki's take on the word

Quote:
The cry of "D'oh!" is typically represented in the show's script as "annoyed grunt." When, the voice actor who voices Homer, was first asked to voice the exclamation he rendered it as a drawn out "dooh", inspired by Jimmy Finlayson, a moustachioed actor of a number of Laurel and Hardy films. The show's creator Matt Groening felt that it would better suit the timing of animation if it were spoken faster so Castellaneta shortened it to "D'oh!"

 
Jenny
130518.  Mon Jan 01, 2007 8:50 pm Reply with quote

AFAIK either form is acceptable.

 
Gaazy
130574.  Tue Jan 02, 2007 3:34 am Reply with quote

I'm getting a bit lost here - are we still talking about ones and one's?

There's only one correct form, and that is with an apostrophe.

Common errors are listed by Kingsley Amis in his The King's English:

Quote:
.....putting in an apostrophe where none is needed, as with possessive pronouns such as its, ours, yours, theirs; though an apostrophe is required in one's.


Fowler:

Quote:
....an apostrophe is required in possessive indefinite pronouns.. [e.g.] one's sister..


Wiki...

...etc. etc.

 
samivel
130604.  Tue Jan 02, 2007 7:48 am Reply with quote

I concur - ones is only really for use in a phrase like 'ones and twos'.

 
mckeonj
130640.  Tue Jan 02, 2007 10:34 am Reply with quote

There is a Parliamentary phrase used when announcing the result of a Division: "The Ayes have it".
Is it "The Ayes' result", or "The Ayes's" result, or "The Aye's result"?

I am a bad, bad, person.

 
suze
130713.  Tue Jan 02, 2007 1:58 pm Reply with quote

Oh you bad person John McKeon!

It's "The Ayes' result", all the same - the result belonging to the Ayes, with Ayes being a plural noun denoting those persons who voted Aye.

 
samivel
130798.  Tue Jan 02, 2007 5:28 pm Reply with quote

Ah, but some folk would say that the apostrophe should be followed by an S...

Not me, but some other annoying pedants.

 

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