View previous topic | View next topic

Query with the book, re: Marmite

Page 1 of 3
Goto page 1, 2, 3  Next

Borlath
129096.  Tue Dec 26, 2006 2:25 pm Reply with quote

Hello all. I recieved the Book Of General Ignorance recently, and one of the statements made me raise my eyebrows.

Whilst I enjoy the book (and, it goes without saying, the show) one thing stuck out when I was reading it - as the thread topic suggests, it's the question about Marmite, on page 143.

Quote:
What's the best use for Marmite? Solving the Arab-Israeli conflict in the Middle East.


Great question, lovely answer. However, a lot of the Israelis wouldn't eat the Marmite, as it's not 100% regarded as being Kosher. I'm not suggesting that it contains bacon, or ground shrimp shells - however, it's status in the "Really Jewish Guide" has it listed as being suitable for a Jewish diet, but that it is 'not manufactured under Rabbinical supervision'. A number of Rabbinical visits have been planned for some years, but there's an issue with the heating pipework. Although it's fully sealed, the interpretation of the rules surrounding it seems to have changed - so that the Rabbi's cannot say that it is 100% Kosher. As it is without this standard, the more Orthodox members of the Jewish faith in the Middle East (and the Sephardic Jews out there are pretty much the most Orthadox) would not eat the Marmite without the blessing of a Rabbi.

Sorry if this has come up before, but there are a lot of posts for me to read through just to see if this has come up in a previous thread, and the Search function didn't yield any results.

EDIT: Interestingly, I've just been informed that this is the same reason that Southern Comfort is only considered to be 100% Kosher if it's the stuff bought in Ireland.

 
Jazzie26
129101.  Tue Dec 26, 2006 4:07 pm Reply with quote

oooooooer, marmite is delicious combined with peanut butter and jam! ;)

Marmite should be included with the "M" series I reckon, with its tastes, textures, colour and everything....

 
Borlath
129104.  Tue Dec 26, 2006 4:44 pm Reply with quote

Well, this is certainly true, Jazzie. A problem with an episode like that, though, is that a viewer would either love it or hate it. ;)

 
Lumpo31
129164.  Wed Dec 27, 2006 1:08 am Reply with quote

The same answer has been used in Australia with regard to "What's the best use for a Tim-Tam?", as they have been distributed in Israel in such a way as to comply with both Kosher and Halal rules.

Don't get me started about Tim-Tams and Penguins. For the record, just to show how assimilated I've become since moving to the UK, I far prefer Penguins - and I actually had to struggle to remember what Tim-Tams were called - although Tim-Tams are available in a wider variety of flavours (chili being one such example). Penguins however are just that little bit better value for money and besides, the jokes are just so corny they're almost funny!

Lisa

 
Borlath
129199.  Wed Dec 27, 2006 7:06 am Reply with quote

Chili flavoured Penguins?

Now that -does- sound Quite Interesting! Not that I'd eat one.

 
Zaphod Beeblebrox
129209.  Wed Dec 27, 2006 7:47 am Reply with quote

Uses for marmite? Don't know about that, but I got my friend a little book entitled "Vinegar: 1001 Practical Uses" for Christmas, so if you want to know about vinegar, I can give her a call.

How do things like that get published?!

 
Lumpo31
129215.  Wed Dec 27, 2006 8:46 am Reply with quote

Borlath wrote:
Chili flavoured Penguins?

Now that -does- sound Quite Interesting! Not that I'd eat one.


Except that they're chili-flavoured Tim-Tams. Small, but slight difference, not noticeable to normal people, but there *are* those who will accept no substitutes. Of course, those people probably wouldn't touch a chili-flavoured with a proverbial barge-pole, so the argument is probably fairly moot.

Here's the now-nearly-obligatory Wiki reference -
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tim_Tams

Plus the Tim Tam vs Penguin debate on "A Nice Cup of Tea and a Sit Down" -
http://www.nicecupofteaandasitdown.com/biscuits/previous.php3?item=48

Lisa

 
Lumpo31
129216.  Wed Dec 27, 2006 8:48 am Reply with quote

Zaphod Beeblebrox wrote:
Uses for marmite? Don't know about that, but I got my friend a little book entitled "Vinegar: 1001 Practical Uses" for Christmas, so if you want to know about vinegar, I can give her a call.

How do things like that get published?!


Did you buy that from one of those small ads in the Sunday papers? That's just about the only place I've seen those books. Oh, yes, and black and white ads in magazines.

Lisa

 
Zaphod Beeblebrox
129217.  Wed Dec 27, 2006 8:50 am Reply with quote

Nah, got it from Book World. I bet the person that wrote it just went around throwing vinegar on various things and noting any effects it had.

 
Lumpo31
129224.  Wed Dec 27, 2006 9:21 am Reply with quote

Zaphod Beeblebrox wrote:
Nah, got it from Book World.


Oh, your friend is *so* lucky! Now you'll be just as lucky, because they'll be going around telling you about the many and varied uses for vinegar (1001 to be precise), a la Manny in "Black Books" when he'd assimilated "The Little Book of Calm" into his system. (Guess who got series one on DVD for their Christmas present??!)

Zaphod Beeblebrox wrote:

I bet the person that wrote it just went around throwing vinegar on various things and noting any effects it had.


Puts vinegar on miscellaneous passing bald pate - "Nup. Oh - wait - white vinegar doesn't work, how about malt? Nup. What about Balsamic? Nup..." etc.

Lisa

 
mckeonj
129251.  Wed Dec 27, 2006 10:46 am Reply with quote

I love Marmite, but I can't eat it because I'm allergic to it. Sad.

Anyway, I thought it worth mentioning the 'Woolton Pie', a World War Two delicacy served when meat was in short supply. It was a pie made with roasted root vegetables in a marmite stock, and a fat free pastry topping.
Nourishing?
Edible?
Delicious?
Yes, yes, no.

Also, I thought that a 'Tim-Tam' was an orchestral percussion instrument, also known as a 'Chinese Gong'. Bombardier Billy Wells used to hit a cardboard replica of one for J. Arthur Rank.

 
Zaphod Beeblebrox
129256.  Wed Dec 27, 2006 10:50 am Reply with quote

Quote:
Oh, your friend is *so* lucky! Now you'll be just as lucky, because they'll be going around telling you about the many and varied uses for vinegar (1001 to be precise),


1002 actually, I added in an extra one myself.

Nothing wrong with Book World.

 
Cleverina Clogs
129260.  Wed Dec 27, 2006 10:56 am Reply with quote

Marmite and tomato on toast ... yum!

 
Borlath
129275.  Wed Dec 27, 2006 11:56 am Reply with quote

Zaphod Beeblebrox wrote:
Nothing wrong with Book World.


A friend of mine works for Book World's parent company (if I remember it correctly) and he always goes on and on about how their books are better value than the books at my local WH Smiths and Ottakers.

This may well be true, but, at the same time, I can't buy anything I actually want to read at Book World. Then again, I'm fussy.

 
Lumpo31
129288.  Wed Dec 27, 2006 12:44 pm Reply with quote

Zaphod Beeblebrox wrote:
Quote:
Oh, your friend is *so* lucky! Now you'll be just as lucky, because they'll be going around telling you about the many and varied uses for vinegar (1001 to be precise),


1002 actually, I added in an extra one myself.

Nothing wrong with Book World.


Oh, I didn't say that!

What was your 1002nd hint?

Lisa

 

Page 1 of 3
Goto page 1, 2, 3  Next

All times are GMT - 5 Hours


Display posts from previous:   

Search Search Forums

Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2002 phpBB Group