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Hedgehog

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dr.bob
133020.  Wed Jan 10, 2007 7:43 am Reply with quote

I remember hedgehog flavoured crisps. You're right that nobody was under the impression that they contained real hedgehog. I believe that the bags boasted how some of the profits were helping to fund a hedgehog charity so you were in fact helping to save hedgehogs by eating the crisps.

 
Frances
137626.  Mon Jan 22, 2007 10:22 am Reply with quote

I've got slugs; I don't want to use slug poison, as it kills birds; where can I get a hedgehog? The Hedgehog Trust never return my calls.

I got some toads from Jenny, many years ago, but haven't seen them for ages. Maybe they're just shy. As an alternative to hedgehogs - can anybody out there help me?

 
BondiTram
137978.  Tue Jan 23, 2007 7:29 am Reply with quote

Frances wrote:
I've got slugs; I don't want to use slug poison, as it kills birds; where can I get a hedgehog? The Hedgehog Trust never return my calls.

I got some toads from Jenny, many years ago, but haven't seen them for ages. Maybe they're just shy. As an alternative to hedgehogs - can anybody out there help me?


I agree on the desirability of hedgehogs and toads.
I had one in the garden a couple of years ago which the dogs barked at but wisely didn't touch. But none since, even in the compost heap.
There was a large toad living, I think, under the house. His name is Buffo - do you think he understands Latin? He has sat on the terrace in the summer (we put the terrace light on and the room lights out for half an hour before closing the shutters. Keeps the bugs away from the door windows and provides plenty of opportunity for study) waiting for supper, but haven't seen him for a long time. Once he was in the bedroom, can't think why. My early-morning-call-dog tripped over him and sent him tumbling but otherwise left him alone. I carefully returned him to his own house.
I had a frog in my deep pond, the one I constructed for swimming in, watching me with a wary eye.
I'm pacing the garden watching for signs of slug destroying natural regeneration.

 
Jenny
138064.  Tue Jan 23, 2007 9:35 am Reply with quote

Frances - I found that burying yogurt pots half-full of beer worked very well for slug-slaughtering purposes. Putting crushed eggshells or sharp gravel around particularly treasured plants is supposed to work too, because the slugs don't like crawling over it.

 
Frances
138599.  Wed Jan 24, 2007 2:28 pm Reply with quote

My slugs are tough - or subterranean. Slugs sneers at shells, since locksmiths are in short supply. I may have to try the beer, though it seems a waste.

 
dr.bob
138719.  Thu Jan 25, 2007 4:42 am Reply with quote

Try using the cheapest beer you can find. Tesco Value Lager springs to mind, although that might be unduly cruel on the slugs.

 
gerontius grumpus
139633.  Sun Jan 28, 2007 9:48 am Reply with quote

The hedgehog was the emblem of St Eric.

 
MatC
144675.  Fri Feb 09, 2007 8:08 am Reply with quote

Frances wrote:
I've got slugs; I don't want to use slug poison, as it kills birds; where can I get a hedgehog? The Hedgehog Trust never return my calls.

I got some toads from Jenny, many years ago, but haven't seen them for ages. Maybe they're just shy. As an alternative to hedgehogs - can anybody out there help me?


I think a problem, Frances, is that hedgehogs are non-territorial, so you can't "re-home" one as such. It's not guaranteed to stay put. The best thing is to make your garden as attractive to hogs as possible, so that any local animals might make it part of their routine to visit you.

 
HasBeany
145903.  Mon Feb 12, 2007 8:03 am Reply with quote

MatC wrote:
Frances wrote:
I've got slugs; I don't want to use slug poison, as it kills birds; where can I get a hedgehog? The Hedgehog Trust never return my calls.

I got some toads from Jenny, many years ago, but haven't seen them for ages. Maybe they're just shy. As an alternative to hedgehogs - can anybody out there help me?


I think a problem, Frances, is that hedgehogs are non-territorial, so you can't "re-home" one as such. It's not guaranteed to stay put. The best thing is to make your garden as attractive to hogs as possible, so that any local animals might make it part of their routine to visit you.


Greetings! PMFJI!

I have the great privilege to volunteer for our local wildlife trust and part of my duties have included hand-rearing abandoned baby animals in preparation for their release back to the wild. Here are two adorable hoglets from last summer.

http://www.womenstuff.org/Pix/rooandpooh.html

I suspect the Hedgehog Trust doesn't reply because they're concerned with wild animals; it's true that hedgehogs won't stay put. They're incredibly curious, which often gets them into trouble.

They ARE wonderful natural slug-munchers, though. If you want to attract them, they'll need lots of natural cover because they're very shy. If you can leave food out without attracting neighbourhood cats, dogs, and rats, make sure it's NEVER bread and milk - hedgies have been known to sicken, even die from cow's milk. Dogfood is usually a good bet, unless you feel like gathering earthworms and mixing them up to a tasty paste in the blender :)

I saw some American websites which actually advertised as suppliers of "pet" baby hoglets shipped from Europe, since hedgehogs aren't native to the US. I find this obscene. They're NOT pets and they're not toys, though people dress them up in widdle baby-doll outfits. Yuch! Even the babies have very sharp spines.

They need to hibernate and are one of the few British mammals to do so. That means they need to lay down layers of fat to last them through the cold weather. When they find slugs they roll them in the dirt with their sharp claws to get the slime off.

VERY INTERESTING FACT: Baby hedgehogs still on milk have bright neon-green poo! This is perfectly normal. The colour changes as they get weaned.

Hope this is helpful
HasBeany

 
samivel
146141.  Mon Feb 12, 2007 2:59 pm Reply with quote

HasBeany wrote:
They ARE wonderful natural slug-munchers, though. If you want to attract them, they'll need lots of natural cover because they're very shy. If you can leave food out without attracting neighbourhood cats, dogs, and rats, make sure it's NEVER bread and milk - hedgies have been known to sicken, even die from cow's milk. Dogfood is usually a good bet, unless you feel like gathering earthworms and mixing them up to a tasty paste in the blender :)



I suggested the earthworm smoothie as an ideal way to attract hedgehogs to my cousin's young daughter, who wanted to write about them as part of a nature project at her school. She promptly changed her focus to magpies.

Welcome, BTW :)

 
HasBeany
150037.  Wed Feb 21, 2007 2:49 pm Reply with quote

samivel wrote:



I suggested the earthworm smoothie as an ideal way to attract hedgehogs to my cousin's young daughter, who wanted to write about them as part of a nature project at her school. She promptly changed her focus to magpies.

Welcome, BTW :)


Thanks! This is a place-holder to say no sooner had I jumped in here than I had a bunch of stuff dumped on me with a deadline. I promise I WILL return v. soon.
Really looking forward to meandering around the QI corridors. :)

 
Caradoc
350161.  Sun Jun 01, 2008 10:11 pm Reply with quote

I arranged the product liability insurance for Hedgehog crisps back in the early 1980's, as I recall there were two varieties Hedgehog ordinaire & Pickled Hedgehog, I preferred the pickled variety despite the fact that neither variety was as flavoursome as real hedgehog; I have eaten hedgehog several times, most recently whilst on an army survival course & it is very tasty

 
Sadurian Mike
350175.  Sun Jun 01, 2008 10:29 pm Reply with quote

I remember the hedgehog-flavoured crisps very well as I was a school and we used to go out and buy them frequently.

My mum's garden was a magnet for hedgehogs; we used to get at least three per week that we noticed but they worried our dog terribly. He didn't know what to do with them and ended up bounding up then running away with the hedgehog standing giving him a Paddington hard stare all the while. They only tended to flinch and contract a little if he pushed his paw at them; even nose to nose contact was apparently acceptable.

In my current house we don't get them at all, but that is partly down to having that hideous council concrete-based fencing (it is an ex-council house) that reaches down to the ground and stops all but the best-equipped sapper hedgehog sections.

I'm going to use sharp stones when I get around to digging my small veg plot. If I catch any of the blighters getting through then I'm afraid I will resort to chemical warfare and get pellets.

 
Curious Danny
583826.  Tue Jul 14, 2009 1:34 pm Reply with quote

A more recent update to this thread showing the ignorance when it comes to basic hedgehog keeping.

http://www.metro.co.uk/news/article.html?Bald_hog_shows_off_his_spines_thanks_to_some_TLC&in_article_id=702255&in_page_id=34

 
Ameena
583923.  Tue Jul 14, 2009 4:15 pm Reply with quote

Aaahh, Spud...he was on the One Show last week. He had sod all quills then. Cute :).

 

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